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Transcript of Thematic webinar: Recruiting, Accommodating and Retaining ... · PDF file Recruiting,...

  • En étroite collaboration avec

    Les opinions exprimées dans ce document ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de Santé Canada

    Thematic webinar:

    Recruiting, Accommodating and Retaining Employees Living with Mental Health Problems or Illnesses

    Presented by: Hélène Sultan-Taïeb, PhD, École des Sciences de la Gestion (ESG), Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

    Mélanie Ladner, Chief, Health Benefits and Strategies, McKesson Canada

  • Part I: What are the costs and benefits of actively recruiting and retaining people living with mental illness?

    Case studies of five businesses

    Research conducted by Rebecca Gewurtz, Emile Tompa, and the entire research team

    The Aspiring Workforce in Canada: Building the Business Case for Employers to Actively Recruit and Retain People Living With Mental Illness

    Funded by the Mental Health Commission of Canada

    2

  • The team and the study

    3

  • En étroite collaboration avec

    Les opinions exprimées dans ce document ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de Santé Canada

    Members of the research team

    ▪ Lead researcher: Rebecca Gewurtz, PhD, assistant professor, McMaster University, Hamilton

    ▪ Principal co-researcher: Emile Tompa, PhD, research scientist, Institute for Work and Health, Toronto

    ▪ Rosemary Lysaght, PhD, associate professor, Queen’s University, Kingston

    ▪ Bonnie Kirsh, PhD, associate professor, University of Toronto

    ▪ Sandra Moll, PhD, associate professor, McMaster University, Hamilton

    ▪ Sergio Rueda, PhD, assistant professor, University of Toronto, adjunct scientist, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

    ▪ Karen Harlos, PhD, professor (full time),

    University of Winnipeg

    ▪ Hélène Sultan-Taïeb, PhD, associate professor, Université du Québec à

    Montréal

    ▪ Arlene MacDougall, PhD, assistant

    professor, Western University, London

    Members of the project team

    ▪ Margaret Oldfield, research coordinator

    ▪ Katie Cook, qualitative data analyst

    ▪ Angela Xie, research assistant

    ▪ Kathy Padkapayeva, project assistant

    4

  • “The economic data from across the

    different organizations highlight the

    significant return on investment for both

    accommodated workers and employers.”

    Costs and benefits of recruiting and retaining people living with mental illness

    https://www.mentalhealthcommission.ca/sites/default/files

    /2018-06/businesscase_for_aspiring_workforce_eng.pdf

  • Context and objectives

    6

  • En étroite collaboration avec

    Les opinions exprimées dans ce document ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de Santé Canada

    Context

    • The vast majority of people living with mental illness want to work.

    • In Canada, the unemployment rate among people living with mental illness is 70-90%.

    • Only 1/3 of employed people living with mental illness receive accommodation (Wang et al., 2011).

    • Today, we are looking at full employment and even job shortages in several sectors in Canada and Québec.

    The challenge: to match supply and demand!

    7

  • En étroite collaboration avec

    Les opinions exprimées dans ce document ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de Santé Canada

    Objectives

    • Identify the appropriate levers and strategies for hiring and retaining people living with mental illness.

    • Describe the costs and benefits, from the perspective of the employer and employees, of hiring people living with mental illness, supporting them, and providing them with accommodation.

    8

  • Methodology

    Cases: Five Canadian organizations in three provinces (Ontario, Alberta, Nova Scotia)

    • concrete actions for hiring aspiring workers

    • with accommodation

    Participants in each organization:

    • employees living with severe mental illness

    • colleagues of these employees

    • first-level managers

    • HR managers

    Types of mental disorders:

    • obsessive-compulsive disorder

    • episodes of major depression

    • bipolar disorder, epilepsy

    9

  • En étroite collaboration avec

    Les opinions exprimées dans ce document ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de Santé Canada

    Methodology

    Analytical approach: multiple-case approach, mixed study (quantitative-qualitative)

    Data collection:

    • individual interviews about work experience (qualitative)

    • individual interviews about the cost of accommodations, gains from these measures (quantitative)

    • observations in businesses, analysis of internal documents

    • a total of 30 participants were interviewed

    Project:12 months (Oct. 2016-Oct. 2017)

    10

  • # Sector Size Type Urban or

    rural

    Profit

    orientation

    Geographic

    scope

    Human

    resources

    dept.

    Union

    1

    Café

    ≤ 100 Private social

    enterprise Urban For-profit Local No No

    2

    Catering

    ≤ 100 Private social

    enterprise Urban For-profit Local No No

    3

    Farming

    100-500 Private Rural For-profit National Yes No

    4

    Bank

    ≥ 500 Public Urban and

    rural For-profit Provincial Yes Yes

    5

    Government

    ≥ 500 Public Urban and

    rural

    Public

    services Provincial Yes Yes

    Organizations in the sample

  • Results 1: Winning strategies for hiring and retaining people living with mental illness

    12

  • Winning strategies identified

    1. Culture of inclusion – Psychological respect and safety, modes of communication – Management of stressful periods at work

    2. Accommodations for employees living with mental illness – Universal support and employee benefits

    – Informal individual accommodations – Official accommodations: rare – Disclosure

    3. Hiring process for people living with mental illness – Variety of hiring strategies – Replacement and multi-skilling

    13

  • Culture of inclusion

    • Psychological respect and safety, modes of communication

    « People with a mental health problem endured deep hardship, including oral and physical violence and beyond. Therefore, the presence of screaming and violent coworkers is a triggering factor and can even lead them to quit their job. To be operational in their workplace, they wish to have a better control of their environment. » [traduction]

    Manager, Organization 1

    • Stress management at work

    • Adherence to management’s message by all levels in the hierarchy

    • Maintaining manager- employee trust and support

    14

  • En étroite collaboration avec

    Les opinions exprimées dans ce document ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de Santé Canada

    Accommodations for employees living with mental illness (1)

    Universal support

    • Flexibility in how, when, and where the work is carried out

    • Beneficial to all employees

    Informal individual accommodations

    • Built on a solid and close relationship with the manager or supervisor

    • Generally not put in writing

    • Sustainability? May not outlive the employee-manager relationship

    15

  • Accommodations for employees living with mental illness (2)

    Official accommodations

    • Rare, including in large organizations

    • Request process sometimes difficult, with possible refusal

    • Mental illness must be disclosed

    Disclosure

    “If the person in a decision-making [position] starts from the place that they want to help… they want to accommodate but stay true to what they need to achieve as a department… that’s kind of the recipe for success.”

    Executive, organization 3

    “The fear that somebody might gossip can hold people back from disclosing or divulging information that could be really helpful for them.”

    Union representative, organization 5

    16

  • Hiring process for people living with mental illness

    Hiring

    • Word of mouth in organizations 1 and 2

    • Large organizations: only one employee disclosed a mental illness (as an asset) during the interview

    • No follow-up for hiring members of groups targeted by employment equity

    Replacement and multi-skilling

    • Multi-skilling in organizations 1 and 2, which facilitates the replacement of employees who are unable to come to work or finish their work shift

    • File-sharing in organizations 4 and 5, which facilitates replacement by colleagues

    • Online platform for sharing work schedules in organization 2

    17

  • Results 2: Costs and benefits of hiring and retaining people living with mental illness

    18

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    Les opinions exprimées dans ce document ne représentent pas nécessairement les opinions de Santé Canada

    Estimate approach

    • Structure