The Student Equity and Talent Management Unit (SETMU ... Educational programme Selection ....

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  • The Student Equity and Talent Management Unit

    (SETMU) Psycho-Social-

    Educational programme Selection

  • Presentation format

    Background and context

    Selection process

    Lessons

    Tensions

  • Up to 2007 2008 2009

    Numbers in 1999; Grades 3 and 2 respectively

    ~ 1 000 000 1 194 425 1 223 529

    Reach Grade 12 ~ 500 000 533 561 44.67%

    551 940 45.11%

    Pass Grade 12 ~ 300 000 231 857 19.41%

    334 718 27.35%

    Qualify for University ~ 80 000 107 462 8.99%

    109 697 8.96%

    Qualify for STEM Studies ~ 25 000

    Table: SA Schooling system, class of 2009 comparisons

    National: Context and Need (cont.)

  • Student Equity Projects

    The Targeting Talent, Investing in Excellence, Facilitating Success Programme (TTP). 2007 2009; 2010 2012; 2011 2016)

    The Bale Scholarship Programme (BALE). (2007 2013)

    Go to University to Succeed Programme (GUTS) (2010 2013).

    The Leadership, Educational and Development Programme (LEAD) (2008 2010)

  • The Targeting Talent,

    Investing in Excellence, Facilitating Success Programme (TTP)

  • Programme Goal

    GOAL: To increase the academic, social and psychological preparation of first generation, academically talented learners from socio-economically disadvantaged and backgrounds and well resourced schools for admission to and success (retention) at South African selective universities

    AIM: the programme aims to achieve this goal through the following phases Identification and selection of academically talented learners from socio-

    economically disadvantaged backgrounds and well resourced schools.

    Working with the same cohort of academically talented learners over a three year period (grades 10, 11 and 12) in order to increase their academic, social and psychological preparation for admission to and success at South African selective universities.. GUTS programme for two years (grade 11 and 12)

    - Tracking the TTP cohort for the duration of university and/or career destinations

  • LEVEL 1

    Grade 10

    Rigorous academic winter 2 week residential programme for learners - Curriculum includes math, science, English language, computer science , forensic Science, information literacy, life skills, molecular literacy, art, dance and sport,

    - Career exploration and workshops via Centre for Counseling and Career Development

    Winter educator 1 week residential training programme -Upgrading subject-specific and subject-didactical knowledge of teachers - Mentoring

    Community project Family and community workshops March and September supplementation school curriculum

    LEVEL 2

    Grade 11

    Rigorous academic winter 2 week residential programme for learners - Curriculum includes math, science, English language, computer science , forensic Science, information literacy, Social Research, life skills, molecular literacy, music, dance and sport,

    - Career exploration and workshops via Centre for Counseling and Career Development

    Winter educator 1 week residential training programme Upgrading subject-specific and subject-didactical knowledge of teachers Mentoring

    Community project Family and community workshops March and September supplementation school curriculum

    LEVEL 3

    Grade 12

    Rigorous academic winter 2 week residential programme for learners - Curriculum includes math, science, English language, computer science , forensic Science, information literacy, Social Research, life skills, molecular literacy, music, dance and sport,

    - Career exploration and workshops via Centre for Counseling and Career Development

    Winter educator 1 week residential training programme Upgrading subject-specific and subject-didactical knowledge of teachers Mentoring

    Community project Family and community workshops March and September supplementation school curriculum

  • GROW TALENT, DONT MINE IT

    Definitions of talent- tends to overlook or even be indifferent to most of the tensions, complexities and controversies associated professionally with the word.

    Two distinctions- broad versus specific, and potential versus accomplishment

    Any answer to the question of who is talented and who is not-tells as much about our values as it tells about the person we are labeling.

    Talent is both content and context dependant- and whether ones knowledge and skill is recognised as talent depends on how much that knowledge or skill matters to others (cf. Csikszentmihalyi & Robinson, 1986 ).

    By arguing that ability is part of the individual-environment transaction, we take the potential out of the hands(or heads) of a few and instead treat it as an opportunity that is available to all although it may be actualised more frequently by some)

  • It is very unlikely that we will ever discover a test that can be administered in childhood that will reliably predict eventual adult outcome.

    Michael Howe (1995)

    Can tests accurately measure potential?

  • The shift from innate characteristic to alterable variable

    Bloom (1985), promoted the shift of talent from innate characteristics to alterable variable for two reasons:

    1. In his research studies he was unable to find the innate qualities or characteristics that would identify talent early in childhood

    2. The data collected by his team told a story again and again of a long term development of talent

    Critical variables for individuals in the Bloom studies became a commitment to talent over a long period of time, persistence, stick-to-itiveness, motivation, willingness to perservere even in the face of periods of failure

  • How to improve your IQ

    Writing Reading Watching Fiction Changing Hobbies. Solving Puzzles Playing

    Competitive Games Breaking Routines Exchanging

    Cultural Views Debating Teaching

  • What do we know IQ?

    "When it comes to improving intelligence, many researchers concluded that it was not possible.

    Our findings, however, clearly show that this is not the case. Our brain is more plastic than we think.

    Professor Deborah Eyre

    Jaeggi (2008)

    .

  • Creating access for students with potential or talent? Many students who have the potential for academic

    excellence do not meet the criteria of high current achievement, but are most likely to develop their potential if given extra assistance.

    Lohman (2005) recommends that one should clearly distinguish between the academic needs of students who show high levels of current accomplishment and those who show promise for developing academic excellence.

    I would argue that it is for the latter group that access opportunities have to be created.

  • Professor Deborah Eyre

  • SELECTION PROCESS

    Multi-modal criteria approach

    Teacher nomination and observation ratings

    Learner biographical questionnaire +essay

    School results (range top 5% - 20%) to measure learners school related performance)

    Parent nomination and observation rating

    Marker evaluation

    Selection committee discussion for each learner

  • Biographical critical tool

    The biographical allows for the `presentation of self' (Goffman 1959) in a way that empowers applicants, in contrast to the representation afforded by other instruments that measure scores, such as in English language achievement tests, which may objectify and so disempower the applicant.

    The BQ allows an applicant to present herself within the context of her own

    experience and, in so doing, to reveal the traits or characteristics which correlate with success at university and provides opportunities for an applicant to reveal them.

  • Interpreting the BQ

    The BQ provides an understanding of the educational, economic, family, language and personal circumstances of each applicant.

    Context of financial and educational affluence are regarded as very different to similar results achieved in a context of disadvantage and hardship.

    Many candidates describe educational, economic and personal contexts characterized by conditions far from conducive to study

    The tendency to attribute the causes of events to issues over which one has control, is interpreted as an internal locus of control, in contrast to explaining events as beyond one's control. Such beliefs would enable a student to approach future tasks positively and purposefully.

  • Qualities identified Evidence that a candidate has dealt in a

    resourceful way with challenges in his/her own background

    Capacity for self-reflection

    Internal locus of control

    Evidence of achievement within own context

    Goal-directedness and career focus

    Awareness of community/political/social issues

    Ability to reflect critically on topical issues

    Evidence of English language and cognitive abilities

  • continued Through the adaptation of the BQ for our programme

    we have achieved an 80% admissions rate to H.E primarily because of the acute awareness that :

    Firstly, measures of achievement such as matric exams, language proficiency tests or psychometric tests lend themselves to a deficit interpretation of student performance.

    The BQ has enabled applicants who otherwise would not have gained admission to University the opportunity to present a narrative of their backgrounds comparable to those who are admitted to the university on the basis of matric scores