The Secret Lives of Cepheids - arXiv Gathered dSLR photometry of Dor ... Table 2...

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Transcript of The Secret Lives of Cepheids - arXiv Gathered dSLR photometry of Dor ... Table 2...

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    THE SECRET LIVES OF CEPHEIDS

    A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF THE ATMOSPHERES AND REAL-TIME

    EVOLUTION OF CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS

    Thesis submitted in March, 2014,

    revised thesis submitted in October, 2014, by

    Scott Gerard ENGLE BSc (Astronomy & Astrophysics)

    Villanova University, PA USA

    for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy,

    School of Engineering and Physical Sciences’

    Centre for Astronomy

    James Cook University, Australia

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    STATEMENT OF CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE THESIS

    Leonid Berdnikov  Astronomer at Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow University

     Provided, in digital form, the O-C data he had gathered/published for  Dor

    Neil Butterworth – AAVSO observer

     Gathered dSLR photometry of  Dor

    Kenneth Carpenter  HST Operations Project Scientist at NASA / Goddard Space Flight Center

     Discussion about the stability, performance and analysis of COS UV spectra

    Kyle Conroy – Graduate Student, Vanderbilt University

     Wrote the Fourier Series fitting routine used in determining Cepheid times of maximum light and light amplitudes

    Nancy Evans  Astrophysicist at Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (retired)

     PI of the Chandra X-ray proposal for Polaris in 2006 (NASA grant Chandra-GO6-7011A)

     Numerous helpful discussions on various aspects of Cepheids

    Ed Guinan – Primary Advisor / Professor of Astrophysics & Planetary Science, Villanova

    University

     Served as PI on all grants used in the thesis

     Many discussions on the direction and methodologies of the study

    Petr Harmanec  Astronomer, Astronomical Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech

    Republic

     Discussions on photometric calibrations

     Provided a list of suitable, photoelectric standards

    Graham Harper – Assistant Professor, Director of Teaching and Learning Undergrad Physics at

    Trinity College, Dublin

     A fount of astrophysical knowledge, especially UV emission lines and stellar atmospheres

    David Turner  Professor Emeritus at St. Mary’s University, Canada

     Discussion on Cepheid period changes and evolution.

     Provided, in digital form, his updated period change data and also his newest equation used to calculate instability strip crossings and period change rates.

    Rick Wasatonic – Adjunct Faculty / Research Associate at Villanova University

     Carried out (and continues to carry out) BV photometry of Polaris

    Ian Whittingham  co-Advisor / Professor Emeritus at James Cook University

     Discussions on thesis formatting, organization and presentation

    Grants Associated with the Thesis:

    NSF grant AST05-07542

    NASA grants: HST-GO11726X, HST-GO12302X, HST-GO13019X, XMM-GO050314X, XMM- GO055241X, XMM-GO060374X, XMM-GO06547X, XMM-GO072354X, SST-GO40968X

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    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    This thesis is dedicated to:

    My best buddy Julie, who has been incredibly loving during this rather long road. Her support,

    through a great many delays, has meant the world to me, and I’ll always be lucky to have her.

    Mom and Rusty, whose pride has always been felt.

    Ms. S and Karen, who always make it feel like I’m part of the family.

    Nan, who cut out every (even loosely) Astronomy-related newspaper article, “just in case I

    was interested…”

    Troy, who always had to know where the Moon was.

    Ed Guinan, my primary advisor and mentor, who took a chance by allowing me to “wrap up

    my Polaris study” and then encouraged its expansion into this thesis, which was only possible

    because of him.

    Lena and Ava, who’ll grow up to be the best and the smartest of us all.

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    ABSTRACT

    Classical Cepheids are variable, yellow supergiants that undergo radial pulsations primarily

    arising from opacity variations in their stellar interiors. Over a century ago, the discovery of a

    reliable relationship between the period of a Cepheid’s pulsations and its luminosity made them

    “standard candles” and, as such, interest in studying Cepheids boomed. The generally held belief

    that their pulsations are essentially static over human timescales has sadly led to a narrowing in

    the field of Cepheid studies. This is in addition to the widespread adoption of high-sensitivity

    CCD instruments that can quickly saturate when observing nearby Cepheids. The result is that

    many of the brightest Cepheids, with the longest observational histories, have recently stopped

    being systematically observed. The primary overall goal of this study is to observe how complex

    the behaviors of Cepheids can be, and to show how the continued monitoring of Cepheids at

    multiple wavelengths can begin to reveal their “secret lives.”

    We aim to achieve this goal through optical photometry, UV spectroscopy and X-ray imaging.

    Through Villanova University’s guaranteed access to ground-based photometric telescopes, we

    have endeavored to secure well-covered light curves of a 10 Cepheid selection as regularly as

    possible. Amplitudes and times of maximum brightness were obtained from these lightcurves,

    and compared to previous literature results. At UV wavelengths, we have been very fortunate to

    secure numerous high-resolution spectra of two nearby Cepheids – δ Cep and  Dor – with the

    Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and additional

    future spectra have recently been approved. Finally, at X-ray wavelengths, we have (again, very

    fortunately) thus far obtained images and X-ray (0.3 – 5 keV) fluxes and luminosities of five

    Cepheids with XMM-Newton and the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and further observations with

    both satellites have been proposed for (XMM) and approved (Chandra).

    Our analysis of optical photometry has shown that 8 of the 10 observed Cepheids have

    amplitude variability, or hints thereof, and all 10 Cepheids show evidence of period variability

    (recent, long-term or even possibly periodic). The UV spectra reveal a wealth of emission lines

    from heated atmospheric plasmas of 104 – 105 K that vary in phase with the Cepheid pulsation

    periods. The X-ray images have detected the three nearest Cepheids observed (Polaris, δ Cep and

     Dor), while the distances of the farther two Cepheids place their fluxes likely at or below

    detector background levels. The X-ray fluxes for δ Cep show possible phased variability, but

    possibly anti-correlated with the UV emission line fluxes (i.e. high X-ray flux at phases of low

    UV flux, and vice versa).

    In conclusion, the optical studies have shown that Cepheids may likely undergo period and

    amplitude variations akin to the Blazhko Effect observed in RR Lyr stars, but on longer

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    timescales. The heating mechanism(s) of their atmospheres appears to be a combination of

    magnetic/acoustic activity, common in many cool stars, along with pulsation-related effects

    (shock propagation and possibly convective strength variability). Further data are required to

    ultimately confirm Blazhko-like cycles in Cepheids, X-ray variability with phase and the

    particulars of the high-energy variability such as phase-lags between atmospheric plasma

    emissions of different temperature and the exact contributions of the possible heating mechanisms.

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    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    ABSTRACT ....................................................................................................................................... 3

    CHAPTER 1 – A CEPHEID OVERVIEW .................................................................................. 13

    Introduction – The Importance of Cepheids ........................................................................... 13

    The General Picture of Cepheids ............................................................................................ 14

    The Cepheid Pulsation Mechanism ........................................................................................ 15

    The Stellar Evolution of Cepheids .......................................................................................... 20

    Development of the Period–Luminosity Law ......................................................................... 22

    Period Studies of Cepheids ..................................................................................................... 24

    Photometric Properties of Cepheids ........................................................................................ 28

    Super-Photospheric Studies of Cepheids ................................................................................ 32

    Thesis: The Secret Lives of Cepheids (SLiC) program .......................................................... 37

    CHAPTER 2 – THE OPTICAL STUDY .................................................................................... 38

    Instrument and Method Overview ....................................................................................................38

    δ Cep ........