The rocking horse winner lesson

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D. H. LawrenceThe rocking horse winnerIntroductionFirst published in 1926 in Harpers Bazaar magazineShort story that incorporates elements of the fable, fantasy, and the fairytale Like a fable, it presents a moralLike a fantasy, it presents supernatural eventsLike a fairytale, it sets the scene with simple wordsThere was a woman who was beautiful, who started with all the advantages, yet she had no luckSetting and Point of View Place: EnglandTime: 1920s, just after the First World War

Point of View: omniscient third-personThe author is able to reveal the thoughts of all of the charactersThree Types of IronyVerbal- the use of language to express the opposite sentiment than what is expectedSarcasm- the speaker says the opposite of what they mean, often for comedic effectSituational- when the exact opposite of what you expect to happen, happensDramatic- when a playwright or novelist creates an ironic situation that only the viewer or reader knows aboutThe reader knows something the characters do not

IronyIronic situations can surprise, enlighten, amuse or sadden readersRemember the irony in The Lamb to the Slaughter?The policeman says Its probably right under our noses and it really was!The irony in that story made you laughWas that verbal, situational, or dramatic irony?Answer: dramatic ironyWe, the readers, knew that the murder weapon really was right under their nosesTheme A storys theme is the central message or perception about life it revealsAs you read, think about what the theme of this story might beConflict A story must contain conflict, or a struggle between two characters, two forces, or a character and a forceIf a main character struggles against some element within himself or herself, it is called an internal conflictAs you read, think about what each character struggles withWhat conflicts do the characters face?

Read Pages 1 and 2 of the story now. Then answer the following questions.What imagery is associated with the mother in the first paragraph?How does she view her family life?How does she view her relationship with her children?

Additional QuestionsWhat is the cause of anxiety in the home?Where do you think the whispering is coming from?

When Paul asks his mother what is luck, what is her answer? Do you agree?According to the mother, why does she think she is unlucky? Do you think she is unlucky? Why?

Read pages 3 and 4 of the story now. Then answer the following questions.How does the conversation about luck affect Paul?Why is Paul so furiously determined to find luck? Consider what message his motivation points toward.How does Oscars attitude contrast with Pauls? What does this suggest about how important the races and luck are to each character?

Read pages 5 and 6 of the story now. Then answer the following questions.Why do you think Oscar not only allows Paul to continue gambling but also becomes a partner in the venture, even though it makes him nervous? What does this decision reveal about his character?

Read pages 7 and 8 of the story now. Then answer the following questions.Why do you think Paul wants to give the money to his mother?Why does he not want his mother to know about it?Pauls mother wants to have all of the money at once. What does that tell you about her character?What is her obsession?Why do you think the voices get louder after Pauls mother receives the 5,000 pounds? What point might the author be making?

Read the last two pages of the story. Then answer the following questions.The narrator does not tell us about the mystery of the rocking horse until the end of the story. What effect does that have on the reader?What is the irony in the boys last speech?In what way is the boy's furious riding on the rocking horse an appropriate symbol for materialistic pursuits?How are the people in the story affected by materialism? For each character, is luck a positive, a negative, or neutral force?Consider what happens in the story because of the adults desire for money. What theme about materialism is the author communicating to the reader?

Reread the passage from the storyAnswer the questionsThere was a woman who was beautiful, who started with all the advantages, yet she had no luck. She married for love, and the love turned to dust. She had bonny children, yet she felt they had been thrust upon her, and she could not love them. They looked at her coldly, as if they were finding fault with her. And hurriedly she felt she must cover up some fault in herself. Yet what it was that she must cover up she never knew. Nevertheless, when her children were present, she always felt the center of her heart go hard. This troubled her, and in her manner she was all the more gentle and anxious for her children, as if she loved them very much. Only she herself knew that at the center of her heart was a hard little place that could not feel love, no, not for anybody. Everybody else said of her: "She is such a good mother. She adores her children." Only she herself, and her children themselves, knew it was not so. They read it in each other's eyes.What is the mothers view of her family life and how does she view her relationship with her children?Reread the passage from the storyAnswer the questions"Is luck money, mother?" he asked, rather timidly."No, Paul. Not quite. It's what causes you to have money."Do you agree or disagree with mother?Reread the passage from the storyAnswer the questions"I shouldn't like mother to know I was lucky," said the boy."Why not, son?""She'd stop me.""I don't think she would.""Oh!" - and the boy writhed in an odd way - "I don't want her to know, uncle.""All right, son! We'll manage it without her knowing."How does Paul find luck?

Why do you think Paul wants to give the money to his mother, and why does he not want his mother to know about it?Reread the passage from the storyAnswer the questionsPaul, at the other's suggestion, handed over five thousand pounds to his uncle, who deposited it with the family lawyer, who was then to inform Paul's mother that a relative had put five thousand pounds into his hands, which sum was to be paid out a thousand pounds at a time, on the mother's birthday, for the next five years."So she'll have a birthday present of a thousand pounds for five successive years," said Uncle Oscar. "I hope it won't make it all the harder for her later."But in the afternoon Uncle Oscar appeared. He said Paul's mother had had a long interview with the lawyer, asking if the whole five thousand could not be advanced at once, as she was in debt.Paul's mother wants to have all of the money at once. What does that tell you about her character? What is her obsession?Reread the passage from the storyAnswer the questionsSo Uncle Oscar signed the agreement, and Paul's mother touched the whole five thousand. Then something very curious happened. The voices in the house suddenly went mad, like a chorus of frogs on a spring evening. There were certain new furnishings, and Paul had a tutor. He was really going to Eton, his father's school, in the following autumn. There were flowers in the winter, and a blossoming of the luxury Paul's mother had been used to. And yet the voices in the house, behind the sprays of mimosa and almond-blossom, and from under the piles of iridescent cushions, simply trilled and screamed in a sort of ecstasy: "There must be more money! Oh-h-h; there must be more money. Oh, now, now-w! Now-w-w - there must be more money! - more than ever! More than ever!"Once the mother gets the money you would expect the voices in the house to stop, but instead they suddenly went mad, like a chorus of frogs on a spring evening. Why do you think the voices did not stop?Reread the passage from the storyAnswer the questions"I never told you, mother, that if I can ride my horse, and get there, then I'm absolutely sure - oh, absolutely! Mother, did I ever tell you? I am lucky!""No, you never did," said his mother.But the boy died in the night.And even as he lay dead, his mother heard her brother's voice saying to her, "My God, Hester, you're eighty-odd thousand to the good, and a poor devil of a son to the bad. But, poor devil, poor devil, he's best gone out of a life where he rides his rocking-horse to find a winner."The narrator does not tell us about the mystery of the rocking-horse until the end of the story. What effect does that have on the reader?What is the irony in the boy's last speech?What is the story saying about materialism?How are the people in the story affected by materialism?What is the theme of the story?What does each character struggle with? What is the outcome of each characters struggle?CharacterStruggles withOutcome of StruggleUnclePaulMotherInternal vs External ConflictIs the principal source of conflict in the story internal or external?Ask yourself:Do these characters face struggles against other characters, forces or do these characters struggle against some element within themselves?How do the outcomes of conflict clarify the theme?