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The News Record is the University of Cincinnati's independent, student-run newspaper.

Transcript of The News Record 2.2.15

  • PATRICK MURPHY | NEWS EDITOR

    With a little less than one-fourth of Tangeman University Centers Great Hall filled, the White House Task Force began hearing testimony after testimony on how to best revise police enforcement methods Friday.

    The University of Cincinnati was selected to host two of the seven national White House Task Force sessions, held in TUC Friday and Saturday. Cincinnati was chosen because of its Midwest locale and its representative demographic on a national scale, but also because of the lack of opportunity that cities like Cincinnati have when discussions like these take place.

    I mean if we went to Chicago, for example, it would be no surprise, but we said, No, lets not do that, said Charles Ramsey, Task Force co-chair and police commissioner of the Philadelphia Police Department. Lets engage people in other parts of the country that dont normally have this opportunity.

    Selected by President Barack Obama, the 11-member Task Force was assigned the mission of hearing multiple testimonies from various professionals, in addition to online messages and tweets from citizens watching the live-feed presented with impaired-hearing translations.

    We got a lot of information, a lot of discussions from the people who presented as witnesses, but also online, Ramsey said. We got a lot of written testimonies that will be very helpful in our ability to formulate recommendations for the president.

    There were a total of five panels for the Policy & Oversight section of the hearings, each panel consisting of four to five members discussing a certain topic within the boundaries of the overall theme.

    These panel topics started with use of force research and policies, then moved on to use of force investigations and oversight, a discussion on civilian oversight and how to handle mass demonstrations, finishing with law enforcement culture and diversity.

    Central ideas that reoccurred throughout

    the discussions included police accountability, transparency of operations and information, communication with all levels involved within a conflict and the need to have a solid policy that makes sense.

    Ramsey said these themes were also presented in the discussions in Washington, D.C., during the Task Forces first session on Jan. 13.

    The discussions began at 10 a.m. and lasted until 5:30 p.m., when the attention moved to audience testimony.

    Experts key testimonies

    Throughout the session, the panels addressed the reoccurring topic of improving relationships between the police and the community, with ideas ranging from allowing citizens to join in ride-alongs with police officers to making internal

    JAMES DOLLARD | CONTRIBUTOR

    The application of anthropology in media studies was the topic of discussion at the Taft Research Center Thursday, when around 25 people gathered to hear about the increasingly popular way of studying cultures and societies.

    Speaker Mark A. Peterson argued that the studies of anthropology in relation to media devices how a specific culture reacts to a method or medium of media, or in what ways it utilizes different mediums is important in recognizing the broad spectrum of media and its affect on its audiences.

    Peterson is a former political journalist from Washington, D.C., who went on to receive his doctorate degree from Brown University. Peterson currently holds a joint position in anthropology and international studies at Miami University.

    Anthropology in media has seen a recent spike in application, yet, due to its relatively late arrival into the field of media studies, it still garners doubt about its contribution to the study.

    Irfan Ibrahim, a second-year architecture student, found himself on the same wavelength as Peterson.

    Its evident that the pervasive nature of anthropology warrants itself in media studies, Ibrahim said.

    Peterson, along with other media anthropologists, argued that the scope of research that an anthropologist engages in could bring a stronger understanding of an audience and its culture through the way the society communicates, through what platforms the people interact with and their preferred sensory stimulant, such as auditory, textual and visual.

    Western media and its studies consider western media to be the norm, but this school of thought neglects the full spectrum of users. Be it scattered locations in Africa or the metropolitan areas of Europe, anthropologists are doing research in virtually every market and region, continually penetrating different cultures, as they adapt their research to the ever-

    JACKIE MULAY | STAFF REPORTER

    African-American feminist, activist and blogger Wagatwe Wanjuki visited the University of Cincinnati Thursday to lead a discussion on gender and justice as a part of the Anita Hill Lecture Series hosted by UCs Its On Us.

    Her talk, titled A World Free of Sexual Violence: Women of Color, Campus Sexual Assault and Title IX, was held in the African American Cultural & Resource Center and drew a diverse crowd. Although the topic of her lecture was serious, Wanjukis biting sarcasm and lighthearted asides created a balanced atmosphere.

    Wanjuki, a first-generation American, attended college at Tufts University, where she was raped in 2008 by an individual she was seeing at the time. Wanjuki sought help from the university but was met with opposition and apathy.

    No one cares about rape and no one really listens, Wanjuki said of her personal experience during the talk.

    After continued opposition from Tufts to take any disciplinary actions against her assailant, Wanjukis assaulters academic

    adviser recommended that she leave the university because of poor academic standings. After she left Tufts, Wanjuki used her digital literacy skills to speak out about her own experience with sexual assault.

    Wanjuki said the Internet is where she feels comfortable, referring to it as her first home during the lecture. Now Wanjuki writes for several blogs, including F*ck Yeah, Feminists!, and Feministing, where she blogs about feminism and activism.

    Wanjukis talk focused mainly on how a university can create and maintain a good sexual assault policy.

    Throughout the lecture, Wanjuki reiterated that sexual assault and rape were forms of oppression.

    Rape isnt about sex, right, its about power, Wanjuki said. Rape is just one instance of oppression one person uses over another.

    Wanjuki discussed the concept of inter-sectionality, the idea that different oppressions based on gender, class, religion and sexuality do not function

    UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI

    THE NEWS RECORD IS THE UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATIS INDEPENDENT, STUDENT-RUN NEWSPAPER

    NEWSRECORD.ORG MONDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 2015

    FREE ADDITIONAL COPIES $1

    Anthropologist, former journalist speaks to problems of media on culture

    Feminist blogger uses experience to promote sexual, gender justice

    SEE ITS ON US PG 3

    DANIEL SULLIVAN | CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER

    Panelists presented their expert opinions and research Saturday on a range of topics from police community engagement through social media to the implementation of on-body camera systems for on-duty police officers.

    UC TALKS 21ST CENTURY POLICING

    SEE ANTHROPOLOGY PG 3

    WHITE HOUSE TASK FORCE VISITS CAMPUS, CONSULTS EXPERTSPharmacy students help pass Ohio bill, change practicesMATT NICHOLS | CONTRIBUTOR

    After only two short years of lobbying, students and faculty from the James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy at the University of Cincinnati have succeeded in passing a bill for Ohio pharmacists and pharmacy interns.

    The bill, which will go into effect March 19, allows pharmacists to administer certain vaccinations to younger patients and will drastically expand the range of immunizations a pharmacy intern can administer.

    This immense shift in pharmacy practices is in part the result of ideas generated right here on UCs campus.

    Two years ago then-state senator Eric Kearney offered his services to an advocacy class at UC that had ambitious goals for pharmacy practices in Ohio. The class, taught by Michael Doherty, director of experiential training and assistant professor of clinical pharmacy practice, worked with the senator to produce a series of three bills that would expand the immunizations practices of pharmacists and pharmacy interns.

    The bills would later be condensed into one comprehensive piece after receiving support from the Ohio Pharmacists Association.

    Following the bills conception, UC students and faculty worked tirelessly with legislators to ensure the bill would gain traction. Students wrote letters to senators, attended various meetings with representatives and even testified in front of the Ohio State Senate and House of Representatives.

    Erin Rogers, a fourth-year pharmacy graduate student and UCs student representative to the Ohio Pharmacists Association Board of Trustees, was one of those students.

    In her testimony, Rogers explained the difficulties that pharmacists have in administering vaccinations. In one case, a mother was attempting to have her two children, aged 14 and 9, vaccinated. The older child could be vaccinated by the pharmacist without a co-pay, but the law required that the younger visit a doctor to receive the vaccine.

    The mom expressed she could not understand why her 9-year-old child was unable to be vaccinated at the same time, and honestly, neither could I, Rogers said.

    The previous law did not allow pharmacists to administer the flu vaccine to patients younger than 14, and pharmacy interns could not vaccinate any patients

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