The Jefferson Performing Arts Society · PDF file discuss lyricist Chris Miller’s song...

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Transcript of The Jefferson Performing Arts Society · PDF file discuss lyricist Chris Miller’s song...

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    The Jefferson Performing Arts Society

    Presents

    1118 Clearview Parkway Metairie, LA 70001

    504-885-2000 www.jpas.org

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    Table of Contents

    Teacher’s Notes………………………..……………….………..……..3 Standards and Benchmarks…………………………....……….…..7

    Background…………………………………….………….….……..……8 My Most Beautiful Day: Creating a Song From Life Events …….……..……….…..26 Everlasting: Inspiring Words.……………………..…..…….…..44 The Forest of Tuck Everlasting: The Scenery Creates the Setting.…...……………63

    The Homes of Tuck Everlasting: Scenery Creates the Setting ………….….……131 Additional Resources……………………………….…..….……...169

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    Teacher’s Notes

    Book by Claudia Shear and Tim Federle Music by Chris Miller • Lyrics by Nathan Tysen Based on the novel “Tuck Everlasting” by Natalie Babbitt Synopsis: Eleven-year-old Winnie Foster yearns for a life of adventure beyond her white picket fence, but not until she becomes unexpectedly entwined with the Tuck Family does she get more than she could have imagined. When Winnie learns of the magic behind the Tuck’s unending youth, she must fight to protect their secret from those who would do anything for a chance at eternal life. As her adventure unfolds, Winnie faces an extraordinary choice: return to her life, or continue with the Tucks on their infinite journey.

    The “beautifully drawn, evocative tale” (Entertainment Weekly) of 11-year-

    old Winnie Foster, a free spirit who longs for adventure.

    Tuck Everlasting is the story of journeys and locations, physical and

    personal. This Study Companion investigates these journeys by providing

    opportunities for further consideration of three adaptations of the story:

    Natalie Babbitt’s book, the Disney film Tuck Everlasting and the musical

    created by Chris Miller and Nathan Tysen. During these investigations,

    students will reflect on how the setting influenced the author, the film

    makers and the creators of the musical and how creating the imagery of a

    setting can connect to mathematical concepts that include shapes, area

    and perimeter.

    Before Tuck Everlasting was a film or a stage play, it was a book. My

    Most Beautiful Day: Creating a Song From Life Events familiarizes

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    students with the story Tuck Everlasting through the exploration of the

    novel by author Natalie Babbitt. Students discuss the idea of adaptation,

    discuss lyricist Chris Miller’s song “My Most Beautiful Day,” compare the

    lyrics of Chris Miller’s song to the excerpt of Natalie Babbitt’s novel and

    then develop their own lyrics from events in their personal lives.

    In Everlasting: Inspiring Words students will explore author Natalie

    Babbitt’s inspiration for the setting of her novel, discuss lyricist Chris

    Miller’s inspiration for the song “Everlasting,” compare the lyrics of Chris

    Miller’s song to Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken,” investigate

    what inspired Robert Frost to write this poem and compare similarities and

    differences between the three pieces of writing (the story, the song lyrics

    and the poem.)

    The Forest of Tuck Everlasting: The Scenery Creates the Setting

    builds on mathematical concepts students learn in preschool: shape

    recognition and identification. As an example, a shape made of straight

    lines with four equal sides is a square, a shape made of three straight

    lines is a triangle, a shape made of straight lines where the sides

    opposite each other (parallel) are equal is a rectangle and so forth. In

    this lesson, we will expand on students’ understanding of both shapes and

    measurement by exploring them through the lens of set design. In this

    lesson, students will become familiar with Natalie Babbitt’s inspiration for

    the setting in Tuck Everlasting, learn about JPAS Technical Director

    Rod Oden and Assistant TD and Tuck Everlasting Scenic Designer

    Kristin Blatchford’s inspiration for the set of the JPAS production of Tuck

    Everlasting, investigate real-life forests, a key element of the setting of

    Tuck, discover how trees adapt to their environment, discuss how set

    designers use research and math to help them develop designs and use all

    this background information to create their own design developed from

    research about the environment of our region.

    In The Homes of Tuck Everlasting: The Scenery Creates the Setting

    students will become familiar with other elements of the setting: the homes

    of Winnie Foster and Jesse Tuck. Students will further explore JPAS

    Technical Director Rod Oden and Assistant TD and Tuck Everlasting

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    Scenic Designer Kristin Blatchford’s inspiration for the set of the JPAS

    production of Tuck Everlasting, investigate and compare the designs of

    real-life homes, discuss how set designers use research and math to help

    them develop designs and use all this background information to create

    their own design developed from research about the different types of

    homes we find in our region.

    "You can't have living without dying. So you can't call it living,

    what we got. We just are, we just be, like rocks beside the road."

    Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbit

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    L o u i s i a n a

    Educational Content Standards and

    Benchmarks The arts facilitate interconnection. They provide tangible, concrete opportunities for students and teachers to explore academic concepts.

    Academic concepts are strengthened when learning integrates academic

    subjects like English language arts with arts. A system of Grade Level Expectations and Standards and Benchmarks is replacing the Common Core

    standards used since 2010 to measure student achievement. Here is some background information on Louisiana Common Core:

    LOUISIANA STATE STANDARDS

    In March, 2016 The Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) approved the Louisiana State Student Standards in English language

    arts and mathematics. This action by BESE replaces the Common Core State Standards with unique state standards developed through a collaborative

    statewide process which included extensive public input and the work of Louisiana educator-led committees. Academic standards define the

    knowledge and skills that students are expected to learn in a subject in each grade. Please visit these sites for more information:

    http://bese.louisiana.gov/documents-

    resources/newsroom/2016/03/04/bese-approves-louisiana-student- standards-adopts-2016-17-education-funding-formula

    http://www.louisianabelieves.com/academics/louisiana-student-standards-

    review

    All Louisiana State Standards were retrieved from: http://www.louisianabelieves.com/docs/default-source/teacher-toolbox-

    resources/k-12-ela-standards.pdf?sfvrsn=36

    https://www.louisianabelieves.com/docs/default-source/teacher-toolbox-

    resources/louisiana-student-standards-for-k-12-math.pdf?sfvrsn=52

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    Background

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    Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt (1975)

    Tuck Everlasting, Natalie Ba9 75, p. 3Tuck Everlasting,

    Natalie Babbitt, 1975, p. 3

    Major Plot Points & Time Period © Summer 2016, Created by Dominique Burns with Wix.com for INFO268-10 Top 100 Project

    Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt is the story ten-year-old Winifred “Winnie” Foster and her life in the small town of Treegap, New Hampshire. Winnie lives with her father, mother, and grandmother in the woods outside of their little town. She spends her days contemplating running away in search of a better existence. One calm and gentle evening in August of 1881 Winnie played in her yard chasing fireflies, like she usually did on most evenings in rural Treegap. This evening was slightly different for reasons that Winnie would soon come to learn. As she played in her yard surrounded by a giant fence and an immense forest, a stranger in a “Jaunty yellow” suit walked up the dirt road to her home in the middle of nowhere (Babbitt, 1975, p. 17). He asked her if this was her house and how long her family had lived there. He asked her if she knew everyone in the town and everything that goes on there. As the strange man stood there at her fence asking even stranger questions, her grandmother came out to fetch her. Her grandmother wanted to know who the stranger was and what he wanted. He didn't answer the questions, but told her grandmother “This young lady tells me you’ve lived here for a long time, so I thought you would probably know everyone who

    http://dominiqueburns.wixsite.com/tuckeverlasting

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    comes and goes” (p. 20). Her grandmother retorted saying she doesn’t know everyone and doesn’t want to, but then something happened. A melody, so quite you could bar