The Great Gatsby

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The Great Gatsby. by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Pre-Reading Discussion Questions. What were the effects of Prohibition during the 1920s? Would it work today? WHY or WHY NOT? What is “the American Dream”? How do you think the concept of “the American Dream” has changed over time? - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsbyby F. Scott FitzgeraldPre-Reading Discussion QuestionsWhat were the effects of Prohibition during the 1920s?Would it work today? WHY or WHY NOT?What is the American Dream?How do you think the concept of the American Dream has changed over time? What does it mean to be successful in America?Is there a dark side to achieving success in America? What role does social status (or class) play in our culture?In high school? Is the American Dream accessible to everyone, regardless of social status (or class)? Pre-Reading Discussion QuestionsIs obsession ever a good thing?How important are money and prestige in achieving true happiness? When can dreams become destructive? What effect do you think materialism has on relationships? How do you think the institution of marriage is different today than it was during the 1920s?Is marriage dead? What are some issues facing married couples today?How true is it that we spend too much of our lives trying to convince others that we are something were not?

About the Author (Fitzgerald)18961940Considered the chronicler of the Jazz AgeBest-selling author of the 1920sSo to whom might we compare him today? Distant relative of Francis Scott KeyWho wrote . . . ??The Star-Spangled BannerSpent his final years in Hollywood writing screenplaysThough just over forty years old, he looked decades olderthe years of drinking and abusing his body had caught up with him. Historical Context (Setting)WHEN: 1922the flapper era; the Jazz Age; the Roaring TwentiesWHERE: Long Island, New YorkScandalous stories of that time period:Mob gangsters made millions gambling and bootlegging1919the World Series was fixedWorld War IPsychological effects on veterans . . . WHY? The Volstead Act of 1919 (Prohibition)How do you suppose this law made criminals (technically) out of almost everyone? How do you suppose it contributed to the decline of morals and values? ThemesCorruption of the American Dreamwealth, greed, materialism, compromised morals and valuesClass (social status)old money, new money, no moneyRomanceAdulteryPast and Future

Crash Course Part I:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xw9Au9OoN88Characters in The Great GatsbyNick Carraway

NarratorLives in the West EggTries to maintain his valuesExists in a world of corruptionRealizes shallowness of othersWill he change? Daisy Buchanan

Nicks cousinToms wife(They live in the East Egg.)In love with Gatsby--(She was his girlfriend years ago, before he left for the war.)Unreal and shallowToys with the past and the presentHow might these things cause trouble or create conflict?

Tom BuchananDaisys husbandEx-jock (football player); attended Yale UniversityBorn into wealthHard, forceful, violentVery opinionated and self-centeredSexist, racist What do you suppose has caused him to be this way?

Myrtle WilsonLives in the Valley of Ashesthe lower class part of townMarried to George WilsonMistress to Tom BuchananLongs for a better life of materialistic thingsManhattan apartmentpaid for by Tom. How might she (from what you know now) represent corruption of the American Dream?

George WilsonLives in the Valley of Ashesthe lower class part of townWorking classowns a garageYears of hard work with little or no gain have worn him down. Unaware of Myrtles affair with TomLoves and adores his wifeWhat is the dramatic irony here?

Jordan BakerFriend of Daisys Becomes Nicks love interestSuccessful pro-golferBeautiful and pleasant Yet shallow and, as Nick says, incurably dishonest Somewhat careless

and, of course . . . GatsbyNicks wealthy West Egg neighbor; owns a gigantic mansionHas become known for hosting huge parties every weekend Self-made manhas spent years acquiring his wealthLoses himself in a world of greed and corruptionHis lust for wealth stems from his desire to win back Daisy, whom he fell in love with years ago. Attempts to recapture the past with wealth and materialism

2013 Movie Trailer The Great Gatsbyhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h7AFnJbETLw

Point of ViewFirst-person Nick Carraways point of viewA mostly reliable narrator whom the reader comes to trustNicks perception of GatsbyAdmiration and intrigue Reminds the reader that despite Gatsbys later foolish or corrupt acts, at the core, Gatsby is great. Nicks perception of the Buchanans Harsh and disapprovingKeeps the reader from liking them too muchShows the reader how corrupt and consumed they are with wealth and materialismSetting Map

Symbolismthe green light and the color greenAt the end of Daisys dock; Gatsby stares at it throughout the novel; it symbolizes his dream as well as hope.automobilespower, status symbols, successthe Valley of Ashesa wasteland; an area of ruin; lower class society East Eggupper class society, glamour, and wealthWest Eggupper-middle class society More Symbolismthe eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg billboard signGods eyes brooding over America Nicks 30th birthdaythe passing of Nicks youth and Gatsbys dreams alcoholmeans of escape; moral decline of society action of the novelmoral chaosthe color yellowwealth, opportunity, and even death

Text-Dependent Questions for Chapters 1 & 2Where in the first two chapters do questions of class, wealth, and privilege arise? Whos rich and whos poor here, and HOW DO YOU KNOW? Cite evidence from the text to support your answer.Nick isnt exactly poor, but how is his money or status different from those of the other characters? Cite evidence from the text that suggests a difference in class between Nick and the other characters. RL.11-12.1. Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a storysetting, plot development, character development, etc. Text-Dependent Questions for Chapters 3 & 4Gatsby talks to Jordan privately in Chapter 3. What do you suppose their conversation was about? Read the epigraph on the title page of the novel. (HINT: Its the quote on the title page.) What does it reveal about Gatsby and his love for Daisy?RL.11-12.2. Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of a text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a storysetting, plot development, character development, etc. DISCUSS: Imagine you are Gatsby at the beginning of Chapter 5. Its the day that Daisy comes to tea. Youve been waiting for this day for five years. How are you feeling? What are you going to say to her?PREDICT: What do you think will happen at Gatsbys next party? There have been some scenes of Gatsbys previous parties. How might this party be different? Text-Dependent Questions for Chapters 5 & 6RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a storysetting, plot development, character development, etc. RL.11-12.5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact. Text-Dependent Questions for Chapter 7PREDICT: What do you think will happen to the relationships between Gatsby and Daisy, Tom and Daisy, Tom and Myrtle, Nick and Jordan? EXAMINE: Myrtle watches Tom, Nick, and Jordan arrive at Wilsons garage. Describe this incident from her point of view. EVALUATE: Tom asks Gatsby about his expression old sport, but Gatsby gives no answer. Why do you think Gatsby calls everyone old sport, and why does it annoy Tom? RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a storysetting, plot development, character development, etc. RL.11-12.5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact. Text-Dependent Questions for Chapter 8What do you suppose prompted Gatsby to talk freely to Nick now when he was unwilling to so in the past? What does Nick mean when he talks about Gatsbys supposed corruption and his incorruptible dream? RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a storysetting, plot development, character development, etc. RL.11-12.5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact. Text-Dependent Questions for Chapter 9/Whole NovelAt the end of the novel, Nick imagines what the continent must have been like when it was first seen by Dutch sailors. How does this idea of the continent then contrast with the environment of the 20th century Jazz Age environment discussed in the novel?Consider the title of the novel. In what way is Gatsby great? RL.11-12.3. Analyze the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a storysetting, plot development, character development, etc. RL.11-12.5. Analyze how an authors choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

West Egg, especially, still figures in my more fantastic dreams. I see it as a night scene by El Greco: a hundred houses, at once conventional and grotesque, crouching under a sullen, overhanging sky and a lustreless moon. In the foreground four solemn men in dress suits are walking along the sidewalk with a stretcher on which lies a drunken woman in a white evening dress. Her hand, which dangles over the side, sparkles cold with jewels. Gravely the men turn in at a ho