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Microsoft Word - Supt - All (1).docxSuperintendent’s Evaluation Rubric
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Superintendent’s Evaluation Rubric, Based on the District’s Five Year Strategic Plan Please rate each category objectively with an attempt to maintain a global focus on each metric. The following categories are meant to evaluate the creation of, adherence to, and continued focus on the broad categories outlined within the District’s strategic plan. The following categories are considered formative in nature. Vision: adherence to and focus on the Board’s vision. All students progress in school and graduate prepared to succeed in and contribute to a diverse global society.
1. The Superintendent does not adhere to the District’s vision. 2. The Superintendent adheres minimally to the District’s vision. 3. The Superintendent fully adheres to the District’s vision but it is not a central focus. 4. The Superintendent fully adheres to the District’s vision and it is central to everything
they do.
Vision: adhering to and maintaining focus on the District’s Vision.
Rating (1-4) 4 (LB), 3.3 (LC), 4 (DW), 3 (IC), 2 (LY), 2.5 (DF), 4 (CG)
Evidence for rating: Entry Plan, Development of Focus 2024, State of the Schools, Numerous documents and public conversations focusing on student outcomes and well-being. Listening tours, employee hotline, reorganization of regions, emphasis on leadership development Student success priorities; strategic plan Bringing in low-cost or free external reviewers, i.e. Council of Great City Schools, to evaluate CCSD departments Standardized K-12 Code of Conduct Roundtables/Instructional Rounds Implementation of MAP; K-8 interim assessment Positive reorganization and alignment of facilities, operational services, and finance departments to streamline CCSD business operations Miscommunication regarding significant changes, e.g. removal of Dean position, Title I funding, and bond revisions
Summary
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Cutting central office ELL and Special Education personnel Overall few gains to reduce achievement gaps Establishing College, Career, Equity and School Choice Unit (CCESU) Pairing FACES with CPD Partnering with Clark County School Justice Partnership Partnering with National Equity Project Collaborative work between departments to deliver professional development for administrators and teachers and TSI schools
Rationale for rating: Stresses the importance of focusing on students and their well-being with this objective appearing throughout the District’s strategic plan Overall good progress but some issues with ELL reorganization, inconsistencies within SOT framework with principal selection, student safety issues need to be addressed more proactively, issues of equity/diversity need to be incorporated into all areas of the District with the goal of inclusivity for all students Superintendent’s decisions are made with student success as the priority Superintendent and his team work towards the District’s vision All programs not reviewed for equity, diversity, and inclusion of all students Imbalance of educational opportunities between student groups, including lack of access to diverse educators Establishing CCESU provides support to all students and opens access to diverse student populations while providing more opportunities for all students Pairing FACES with CPD strengthens the services provided and aligns the focus to student achievement; this supports families in a strategic manner and promotes student success up to graduation Partnering with School Justice Partnership addresses achievement issues related to behavior or attendance and provides needed wrap around services; also addresses disproportionality Implementation of a standard K-8 assessment allows for continuity in a system where students are highly transient; also aligns to SBAC
Summary
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Prime 6 and Innovative Schools benefit from the collaborative work between multiple departments – ensuring all children receive a high quality education
Commendations: Appears fully committed to the District even in times of adversity Focuses on what he feels is best for all students while questioning whether historical practices have yielded expected results or not Face to face meetings with principals Growth of Magnet and STEAM Academies Increase in student centered programs Increased community and business involvement Utilization of strategic plan as structural boundary for all District departments Increase in DUAL Credit/CTAs/CTE Concerted effort to learn about CCSD and Southern Nevada through listening tours with ideas generated through the process Quickly implemented recommendations after the Council of Great City Schools Review of Business Operations Focus of work has been centralized around great instruction and opportunities for all students Decisions are made with focus on what is best for students versus special interests
Suggestions for measurable growth/improvement:
Increase community buy in and shared ownership of student outcomes Need specific data reflecting results of increased mental health services and/or programs Continue to focus on increasing graduation rates, ACT/SAT scores, AP test pass rate, dual enrollment and credit opportunities Improve decision-making systems and communication dissemination to prevent organizational pain and disruption Allow additional time for feedback and input Include and review data for behavioral schools and incarcerated
Summary
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programs and post-secondary educational opportunities for these students Continue work that supports expanding opportunities in comprehensive schools as well as magnet and CTA programs, including more partnerships with business and industry which to allow students to gain real world experience Implement “second-shift” CTA programs to accommodate more students Be mindful of and monitor the impact recruitment of students to magnet and CTAs impact their zoned school Communicate and insist that traditional magnet/CTA expectations of student effort, behavior and attendance are shared with students and families unfamiliar with the level of commitment required
The following comments were not included above because they were not submitted in a format that placed them in one of the categories outlined within the provided rubric. I did not want to assume the intention of the author. Created organizational chart and made necessary improvements to operations of departments. Quick reaction to school safety issues. Installing random searches has drastically lowered weapons taken to schools. Implemented restorative justice. The reorganization of the district was not well though out. It was also against the law. Didn’t know money would be wasted by employees staying at the same range. Should have been well- informed by talking to principals first. Made changes to Title I funding without consulting the board or school principals and without considering any other options or a hold-harmless plan. Acceleration Academies was misrepresented as no-cost to the district and is now a cost to schools. Proposed spending over half $1 billion for two new CTAs with very little community or staff input. Made promises to open school sites with little vetting from those impacting and without consideration of costs, damages, and risks. Snow day – no forward thinking of unintended consequences. Schools lost $100K from cancelled trips. Didn’t complete safety audits with the state. Cost district millions of dollars in safety money. Facilities: created pilot to reinstate building engineers. Student Success Targets: developing and reporting on student outcomes.
1. The Superintendent has not created student success targets. 2. The Superintendent has created student success targets but the results are not
monitored or reported consistently. 3. The Superintendent has created student success targets and the results are presented
to the board on a regular basis.
Summary
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4. The Superintendent has created student success targets, the results are presented to the board on a regular basis, and a process for ongoing monitoring has been established.
Student Success Targets: creation of student success targets, maintaining focus on student success, and monitoring results.
Rating (1-4) 4 (LB), 4 (LC), 4 (DW), 4 (IC), 2 (LY), 3 (CG)
Evidence for rating: Focus 2024, numerous Focus 2024 Board presentations, 8/8/19 Monitoring Schedule Development of Leadership Pipeline with goal of increasing pool of effective school leadership to increase student achievement Establishment of College, Career, Equity and School Choice Unit Establishment of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment Unit Active use of K-12 student code of conduct through multi-tiered systems of support MAP Accelerator test structure via Khan Academy K-12 Literacy and Language Development Department CCSD Balanced Assessment System ZOOM Schools WiDA Growth Gains in Advanced Placement Pass Rates Collaborative work between departments NWEA partnership Establishing CCESCU Pairing FACES with CPD Partnering with School Justice Partnership Collaborative work with County Commission on Truancy and Pre-K Innovative Schools Addressing remediation rates for students entering NSHE institutions
Summary
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Rationale for rating: Fully developed strategic with metrics clearly outlined and a monitoring calendar adopted by the Board Leads and supports the use of data informed instructional goals Successful creation of student success targets with monitoring report timeline All TSI Schools benefit from collaborative work between departments Structure and process for monitoring metrics for initiatives not covered within the strategic plan are not established
Commendations: Developed a clear vision with measurable objectives reported on a regular basis Detailed presentations provided at public meetings with briefings offered to trustees Limiting focus to things within the strategic plan to prevent the District from continuously getting sidetracked while questioning existing practices District goals are systematically aligned with Focus 2024 strategic plan Established high targets with yearly targets to help breakdown the larger goal; allowing room to modify interventions if results aren’t positive Focus centralized around all students Refocusing financial resources to items that require more attention; more funding still required for items within strategic plan
Suggestions for measurable growth/improvement:
Easier to digest strategic plan layout Aligning strategic plan with those of external stakeholders Scheduling fewer presentations in each Board meeting Continue to refine information being presented and ask questions related to data; look at data in a deeper manner with a clear understanding of the whole picture More community inclusive when promoting the Focus 2024 presentation topics (i.e. announce topics in social media posts for Board meetings) Continue to provide and identify targeted professional that produces
Summary
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results Continue expanding opportunities and partnerships to benefit more students
Trustee Ford’s rating was not included because she did not provide a rating for the agreed upon metric. The appropriate place to rate the success of summative metrics is in the section entitled Key Performance Indicators Scorecard (Summative Only). Her comments are listed below: Rating 2: This metric is very flawed. It doesn’t make sense to evaluate on if targets were created/reported on or not. My rating is based on the success of the targets in the Focus 2024 strategic plan. Trustee Garvey’s comments within the evidence category were restated in a single statement instead. Some of her suggestions were included under a previous metric so they were not listed again. Core Values: adherence to and focus on core values. High Expectations, Accountability, Equity, Innovation, Integrity, Customer Service, Communication
1. The Superintendent’s actions or decisions are consistently incompatible with the District’s core values.
2. The Superintendent’s actions or decisions are occasionally incompatible with the District’s core values.
3. The Superintendent’s actions or decisions are consistently compatible with the District’s core values.
4. The Superintendent’s actions or decisions are consistently compatible with the District’s core values and they promote a culture that also aligns with the District’s core values.
Core Values: adhering to and continuously aligning with established core values while promoting a culture aligned to core values.
Rating (1-4) 3.1 (LB), 2.5 (LC), 3 (DW), 3 (IC), 2 (LY), 1.5 (DF), 3 (CG)
Evidence for rating: Specific instances of avoidable situations Entry Plan, Development of Focus 2024, State of the Schools, Numerous documents and public conversations. Communication issues related to removal of Dean positions and Title I changes; difficulty communicating key information to promote an atmosphere of trust and positive inter-personal relationships with all stakeholders
Summary
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Emphasis on the best education for all students Raising the bar for adults in the system 234 separate meetings, 4,500 stakeholders engaged Bringing in a balanced assessment at no cost to schools Reorganized central services with a cost savings Settled all 5 bargaining unit agreements within 90 days of starting Focus 2024 development and reporting timeline; MAP; MTSS Modifications to magnet requirements Need of long & short term plan to address teacher shortages and plan to diversify teacher and leadership pools Organizational pain and uncertainty surrounding changes/reorganization of Equity & Diversity Department Use of free/low-cost resources to review CCSD Business Operations; implementing recommendations Integrity expressed through positive intentions Implementation of anonymous hotline to report staff misconduct Miscommunication regarding significant changes, i.e. removing Dean positions, Title I funding, and bond revisions This section did not include leadership, which is central to every aspect of core value Ensuring a high-quality teaching force is one of the most important thing to raise student achievement Inequitable patterns of access to strong, high-quality teachers and substitute teachers Principal, teacher and support professional leadership are crucial to reaching school and classroom goals integrated with good communication and customer service
Rationale for rating: The combination of all core values in one metric resulted in a lower rating Lack of ability to course correct for a higher rating since no midyear
Summary
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evaluation was given Moves with a sense of urgency; working tirelessly his first 90 days to complete a listening tour Juice/Java with Jara Forged relationships with elected officials, community leaders, business leaders, employees, and Trustees and sought feedback from stakeholders Continued to relay his findings after his listening tour and provided an opportunity for continued engagement Petitioned the Department of Education to shorten teacher and administrators evaluations while maintaining integrity of the process after receiving feedback regarding the process Worked with the Board within three day-long Board retreats to form goals outlined within the strategic plan Superintendent takes accountability and responsibility for his mistakes IC rated all values individually and rounded the score Communication to staff, Trustees and the community regarding the elimination of Deans, reassignment of principals from selected school to innovative schools Communication and customer service: lack of consistent and required content when it comes to information on school websites Elimination of deans was not effectively communicated
Commendations: Expresses high expectations and has a clear understanding and expectation of accountability. Willingness to own mistakes and adapt future behavior. Focuses on equity in ways previously not done, such as redirecting Title I funds to schools with the highest need. Shows a willingness to question existing practices. Very active presence in the community, at schools, and with business partners Effective implementation of student centered programs
Summary
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Facilitated attendance of Harvard Business School Training with Board of Trustees Implementation of a K-9 assessment so a common language can be developed at no cost to schools Restructuring teacher and administrator evaluations Large gains within the Business Operations side of CCSD as a result of the Council of Great City Schools Business Operations review
Suggestions for measurable growth/improvement:
Clearer communication with Trustees with logic more clearly articulated and a more fully developed plan presented. Develop a consistent process of communication with a minimum threshold established and adhere to it; develop an effective follow-up system to monitor duties that have been delegated to a Cabinet member to ensure success Build trust between Trustees and the Superintendent so that we can trust each other to not use such information in a negative manner to undermine decisions made by staff. Develop a clearer definition of operational decisions and differentiation from oversight. Professional development in communication, possibly Carnegie Communication seminar, or similar course in active listening Continue to look for opportunities for inclusion at every level Develop a culture of responsiveness in all departments with a focus on customer service Improve communication at all level, including staff, community, and each other Provide additional support to school leadership since principal to supervisor ratio is higher than other district after reorganizing Develop a clear, compassionate and consistent message when delivering changes with action steps and larger goal/vision Provide spaces for feedback from a broader spectrum of voices Implement a more methodical method when making large scale decisions so unintended consequences are more fully considered Communicate sooner and continue to learn the cultural nuances of the community
Summary
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Spend more time in schools to develop two way communication with staff Act with urgency but be more thoughtful regarding unintended consequences due to poor planning, lack of foresight, or rushed implementation
Please include a definition for each component listed and your rationale for your rating.
The following comments were not included above because they were not submitted in a format that placed them in one of the categories outlined within the provided rubric. I did not want to assume the intention of the author. Board/Superintendent Governance Team Lack of board support specifically around limiting policies and practices, purposely adding to the dysfunction. Favors individual trustees. Pits board members against each other.
- Telling one trustee something and another something else. - Falsely representing the positions of other board members on agenda items.
Cut board liaison apt. The 2 new trustees did not receive the same on boarding support the rest of the board did. Makes decisions and deals without board approval.
- Hired council to negotiate on behalf of district before board approval. - Acceleration academies was advertising for positions in Clark County before the board
had seen the agenda item. Doesn’t answer questions directly. Talks in circles without getting to an answer. Causes Trustees to keep asking the same questions which wastes valuable meeting time. Does not give options or create contingency plans for opposition from board, i.e. snow day/makeup day, Thanksgiving break. The only board training provided has been with the Council of Great City Schools. (It’s a great organization to be part of for the insight of operating a large urban district but they highly favor the superintendent. I do not support our retreats being led by them anymore or having their help with establishing our board governance policies). Many staff members attended and presented at the 2019 CGCS conference and in my opinion, was of no value to CCSD and a waste of district resources. The superintendent and board attended an Executive Training at Harvard which had great material, yet we haven’t discussed or implemented anything we learned. Patterns of concerning behavior: Impulsive decisions with little or no thought process Dishonesty and manipulation tactics Poor judgment Withholding important and relevant information. Misconstruing facts. A complete disregard of other people’s opinions or feelings Dismissive and/or vindictive towards anyone who speaks against him and his decisions Does not consider morale. Lack of empathy,
Summary
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Dismisses or repackages ideas from others. Takes credit for everything good. Blames staff for everything bad. Theory of Action: adherence to and focus on the established Theory of Action. Our people drive our success. In order to realize this plan, we must commit to attracting, growing, retaining, and rewarding our people.
1. The Superintendent’s actions or decisions are consistently incompatible with the established Theory of Action.
2. The Superintendent’s actions or decisions are occasionally incompatible with the established Theory of Action.
3. The Superintendent’s actions or decisions are consistently compatible with the established Theory of Action.
4. The…