SIES consumer behavior session IV

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Transcript of SIES consumer behavior session IV

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    Attitude changes &culture

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    Changing affect

    To try to change affectT his may or may not involve getting consumersto change their beliefsT he approach of classical conditioning try topair the product with a liked stimulus.pair a car with a beautiful woman

    a biscuit with smart kidan edible oil with healthy family

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    Changing behavior

    P eople like to believe that their behavior isrational; thus, once they use our products,chances are that they will continue unless

    someone is able to get them to switch.

    T o get people to switch to our brand is to usetemporary price discounts and coupons;

    however, when consumers buy a product ondeal, they may justify the purchase based onthat deal (i.e., the low price) and may thenswitch to other brands on deal later.

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    Changing behavior

    Another way to get people to switch to our brand is to at least temporarily obtain better shelf space so that the product is more convenient.

    C onsumers are less likely to use this availabilityas a rationale for their purchase and may

    continue to buy the product even when theproduct is less conveniently located.

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    Approaches to belief change

    Change currently held beliefsIt is generally very difficult to attempt to change

    beliefs that people hold, particularly those thatare strongly held, even if they are inaccurate .ExamplesDalda vanaspati (hydrogenated oil)P apad sold in the market

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    C hange the importance of beliefs

    T o strengthen beliefs those already are in favor of the product

    M ost consumers already agree with this, but thebelief can be made stronger.

    F or example P romise tooth paste clove oil

    C olgate Active contains saltVatika Hail oil -Amla

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    Add beliefs

    Consumers are less likely to resist theaddition of beliefs so long as they donot conflict with existing beliefs

    F or example B ournvita with milk

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    C hange ideal

    I t usually difficult, and very risky, toattempt to change ideals,

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    C ulture and Subculture C ulture is part of the external influences that

    impact the consumer T hat complex whole which includes knowledge,

    belief, art, morals, custom, and any other capabilities and habits acquired by person as amember of society.

    K nowledge and beliefs are important partsA person who is skilled and works hard will getaheadDifferences in outcome result more from luck.

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    M orality I n general, view is that one should not be naked in

    public. In Japan, on the other hand, groups of men andwomen may take steam baths together withoutperceived as improper.

    O n the other extreme, women in some Arab countriesare not even allowed to reveal / faces. B y the way, that what at least some countries view as

    moral may in fact be highly immoral by the standards of another country.

    F or example, the law that once banned interracialmarriages in South Africa was named the ImmoralityAct, even though in most civilized countries this law,and any degree of explicit racial prejudice, would itself be considered highly immoral.

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    Important characteristicsComp rehensiveAll parts must fit together in some logical fashion

    C ulture is learned rather than being something we areborn with.

    M anifested within boundaries of acceptablebehavior

    C onscious awareness of cultural standards islimited

    F alls somewhere on a continuum between staticand dynamic depending on how quickly thesociety accept change.

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    C ultural differences center aroundfive key dimensions

    I ndividualism vs. collectivism:T o what extent do people believe in individualresponsibility and reward rather than having

    these measures aimed at the larger group?

    C ontrary to the stereotype, Japan actually ranksin the middle of this dimension, while Indonesiaand West Africa rank toward the collectivisticside.T he U.S., B ritain, and the Netherlands ratetoward individualism.

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    C ultural differences center aroundfive key dimensions

    P ow er distance :T o what extent is there a strong separation

    of individuals based on rank?P ower distance tends to be particularlyhigh in Arab countries and some LatinAmerican ones, while it is more modest inNorthern Europe and the U.S.

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    C ultural differences center aroundfive key dimensions

    M asculinity vs . fem ininity M asculine values involve competition and conquering

    nature by means such as large construction projects,

    while feminine values involve harmony andenvironmental protection.

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    C ultural differences center aroundfive key dimensions

    U ncertainty av o idanceA structured situation with clear rules ispreferred to a more ambiguous one; in general,countries with lower uncertainty avoidance tendto be more tolerant of risk.

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    C ultural differences center aroundfive key dimensions

    Long term Vs. Short term orientation

    In the U.S., managers like to see quick results,while Japanese managers are known for take along term view, often accepting long periodsbefore profitability is obtained.

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    Types and Application of the body languageDistance between people conversingDifferent people have different ideas about the proper distance

    between people conversing.Four main distances in American social and business relations:

    Intimate - 45 centimetersPersonal - 80 centimetersSocial -1.30 meters to 3 meters

    Public - > 3 metersWatch an Arab and an Englishman in negotiation.The Arab, showing friendliness in the manner of his people, willstand close to the Englishman. The latter will move backWatching to the Englishman, The Arab will then move forward tobe closer;

    The Englishman will keep moving backward.By the end of the negotiation, the two may be quite a distance

    from the negotiation;The two may be quite a distance from the place where they wereoriginally standing!

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    P hysical appearance and physical contact

    P lays a very important role in creating first impression. P hysical attractiveness affects the way you perceive yourself andthe way others perceive you.

    P ersonal Dress: C lothing has been found to affect perceptions of credibility, likeability, attractiveness, and dominance.

    P hysical contact: generally avoided in conversation among ordinaryfriends or acquaintances. M erely touching someone may cause anunpleasant reaction.

    T ouching, patting, hugging or kissingcan be quite embarrassingand awkwardNo harm is meant, and that such gestures are merely signs of friendliness or affectionWould be considered rude, intrusive and offensive and could arousea strong dislike and even repugnance.

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    Amount of eye contact varies greatly among cultures.

    F rench will demand at least some direct eye contact. T o refuse tomeet someones eyes an unfriendly gesture.Americans see eye contact as a sign of honesty and a lack of eyecontact or shift eyes as a sign of untruthfulness.

    Japanese who believe that the less eye contact, the higher the levelof esteem. T o divert eyes from a business colleague is a sign of respect and reverence.

    C hinese avoid long direct eye contact to show politeness, or respect, or obedience,

    B ritish believe that looking someone directly on the eye to be a markof rudeness until a more familiar relationship is established.

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    G estures

    G esture is the expressive movement of a part of the body,especially the hand and the head.Same gestures have different meanings in different cultures.

    F or coming here, C hinese gesture is a hand extended toward theperson, open palm, fingers crooked in a beckoning motion; T he American is a hand extended toward person, close hand, palmup, with forefinger only moving back and forth.

    F or Americans, the C hinese coming-here gesture is like good-byegesture.

    M any C hinese would see American coming-here gesture asoffensive.

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    L anguage issues

    O ne word may mean one thing in onecountry, but something off-color in theanother.

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    Celebrity endorsement

    Impact on B rand

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    Celebrity endorsements motives

    I nstant B rand Awareness and Recall. C elebrity values define,