Shrewd Foodie

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System & User Interaction Development Project:The Shrewd FoodieKaty Bibby & Susan ScullyMay 5, 20091Contents1 Introduction 42 User Model 42.1 Why would someone want to use the system? . . . . . . . . . . . 52.2 What tasks will the system allow the user to do? . . . . . . . . . 52.3 Possible Target User Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62.4 Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62.5 The Simplex One Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Task Analysis 93.1 Hierarchical Task Analysis (HTA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93.2 Review of some systems currently available . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Requirement Gathering 114.1 Functional Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114.2 Technological Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134.3 Legal Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134.4 Data Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144.5 Environmental Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144.6 User Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144.7 Usability Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Design & Storyboarding 155.1 Design Decisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155.2 Storyboarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Prototype Implementation 216.1 The Prototype . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216.2 Prototype Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216.3 Prototype Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Evaluation of Final System 247.1 Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247.2 System Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257.3 System Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 Conclusion 288.1 Future Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28Appendices 30A Questionnaire given to potential users 30B Responses to questionnaire 32C Prototype screenshots 35D Prototype Testing Script 39E Prototype Testing: Responses 402F Final System screenshots 42G Final System Testing Script 46H Final System Testing: Responses 4831 IntroductionOur initial proposal was for a system that takes the stress out of food manage-ment for users by: keeping track of the users food stocks suggesting recipes based on current food stocks incorporating the users own recipes ??? creating shopping lists based on users recipe choicesWe developed our system according to the User-Centred System Design(UCSD) process. According to this school of thought, the process of develop-ment of computer systems should focus on the user and the users requirements.In the past, computer programs were designed from a programmers point ofview. The functionality of the system was focused on and the user usuallyneeded a big manual or extensive use of a help function in order to use it. Thetheory behind UCSD is that systems should be developed keeping the usersneeds in mind at each stage of the development process. The ideal that we areworking towards is of a system that is self-explanitory to the extent that theuser has no need for a manual, for a help function or for extensive instructionsin order to use the system. UCSD has a much more foresightful approach todevelopment and it is clear why the approach is becoming the norm amongsoftware developers.UCSD denes six main stages of the development process: User Modelling Task Analysis Requirements Gathering Design & Storyboarding Prototype Implementation Evaluation of Final SystemOne of the guiding principles of the HCSD process is that the steps should beiterated. The steps are exible and are to be revisited and re-examined as thedesign progresses.An interactive system was to be developed following the principles of UCSD.This document details the steps that we carried out as part of the developmentof our system.2 User ModelThe rst step involves identifying the potential users of our system: who is oursystem aimed at? By identifying distinct user groups we can design the systemspecically gauged to their needs. Neglecting this step can prevent the systemfrom being truly usable to any group of users.42.1 Why would someone want to use the system? Helps the user to remember food supplies already at home Saves the user from remembering whats on shopping list Helps the user to make best use of food supplies currently at home Prevents food waste Can help save money Allows user to access what supplies they have when not at home Saves time Can help monitor diet as only ingredients required to make particularrecipes are added to shopping list. Also, it enables meals to be carefullyplanned. All recipes are stored in one location The user doesnt have to check cupboards to see which ingredients areavailable2.2 What tasks will the system allow the user to do?Recipes Browse recipes on system (samples will be included) Input recipes Choose a recipe based on current food stocks The system will calculate quantities based on the number of portions re-quiredStock Control View current food stocks Input current food stocks (important when rst using system) Update food stocks automatically by adding items to store cupboard whenticked o the shopping list and by removing them when a recipe is used Update food stocks manually by adding items not bought through shop-ping list and removing items not used in a recipe (for example, when youeat an apple!)Shopping List The system will automatically create a shopping list based on chosenrecipes It will also calculate quantities required based on the number of portionsselected Manually add items to shopping list Type in a new ingredient or select from ingredients currently stored indatabase52.3 Possible Target User GroupsThe potential user groups are as follows: Housewives/husbands/people in charge of household food management.These people will have varying levels of computing experience. People with an interest in the system from a technological point of view butperhaps with limited experience with cooking or household management. People with limited income. The system may help to avoid waste andtherefore save money. Blind/visually-impaired people might nd this system very useful. Cur-rently, monitoring stock is a very visual-based activity. The system givesa text representation of this which could easily be read by text-to-speechsoftware. People with poor memory/learning disabilities. Shopping becomes eas-ier as they dont have to remember what stocks are available and whatquantities are required for dierent recipes.People who will not use the system: Very disabled people. If someone is unable to cook or if it is unsafe to doso, the system will not be appropriate. Children People with very little or no experience using computer-based systems.The system does not require a huge amount of technical expertise but willneed a basic understanding of modern technologies used or some training. People with no interest in cooking2.4 SurveyIn order to obtain further information about our potential users, we gave fourpotential users a questionnaire to ll out. This was sent via email and can befound in appendix A.Half of the users said that they already used the internet to nd recipes andso it seems likely that they might use our system. Also all users expressed ageneral interest in using the system. Two users said they would like to use it in order to save time and be moreorganised. One user said they would nd it useful to prevent them forgetting itemswhile shopping. Two users said they would use it to add more variety to their cooking asit would make planning easier. One user said it could save them money and another that it could helpavoid waste.When users were asked what features they would like to see included threeinteresting functions were suggested: Add own recipes Exclude certain recipes based on preferences6 Calculate quantities based on number of portionsThese ndings were very useful in that, not only did they reinforce our ownideas, new ideas were put forward. The suggested features were taken on boardas part of the proposed system.2.5 The Simplex One ModelIn order to better understand what happens when someone uses a system, psy-chological theories are sometimes used. They work