Short and sharp: write your truth in haikus Haikus are very short, non-rhyming poems. They were...

Short and sharp: write your truth in haikus Haikus are very short, non-rhyming poems. They were invented
Short and sharp: write your truth in haikus Haikus are very short, non-rhyming poems. They were invented
download Short and sharp: write your truth in haikus Haikus are very short, non-rhyming poems. They were invented

of 2

  • date post

    03-Aug-2020
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    0
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Short and sharp: write your truth in haikus Haikus are very short, non-rhyming poems. They were...

  • Key stage 2

    www.nationalpoetryday.co.uk

    In poetry, truth  A National Poetry Day resource created by Usborne

    Usborne is the UK’s leading specialist children’s book publisher: an independent, family business which creates engaging, innovative, accessible books for children of all ages. This exercise is taken from Write Your Own Poems by Jeremy Martin.

    Short and sharp: write your truth in haikus Not all poems have to rhyme. Haikus are very short, non-rhyming poems. They were invented hundreds of years ago in Japan, and are still written today. A haiku is usually three lines long. Here is an example:

    This late summer night the narrow new moon swims up: an octopus eye.

    Its first line has five syllables, the second has seven syllables, and the third has five – making a total of 17 syllables. Haikus traditionally include at least one word or phrase that refers to a season or time of year. This part of the haiku is known as a kigo.

    Snow deepens outside. Sleepy student, wakeful mouse – both nibble their books.

    In this haiku, “snow deepens” is a kigo. It shows that the poem takes place in the wintertime. Turn over for a list of kigos you could use in poems about the seasons.

  • #nationalpoetryd ay

    In Poetry, Truth

    y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y

    Find even more information and inspiration www.nationalpoetryday.co.uk

    You could use some of these kigos in your poems.

    AUTUMNAL WORDS Mist Migrating geese Haystacks Falling chestnuts Harvest moon Lingering dusk Pumpkins Crisp air Spider webs Mushroom gathering Red and yellow leaves Bonfires Lamplight

    WINTERY WORDS Bare branches Lost mittens Holly leaves Icicles Frozen streams Withered fields Gingerbread Runny noses Frosted windows Blizzard Fireplace Ice skates Fresh snow

    SPRING WORDS Foals Mud Daffodils Bluebells Flying kites Spring rain Cherry blossoms Racing lambs Green buds Thawing ice Flooding streams Sparrows twittering

    SUMMERY WORDS Watermelons Bare feet Short nights Fireworks Thunderstorms Cicadas Billowing clouds Shady trees Mowing grass Swimming pools Sunflowers Hot afternoons Mosquitos

    Write your own haikus and share them with us on National Poetry Day using #NationalPoetryDay and #MyNPDPoem