SABZ Pressure Vessel Handbook 10ed Megyesy Original

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  • Click on the arrow buttons on the tool bar above to page through the book. Pages which were blank in the print version of the Pressure Vessel Handbook have had substitute pages inserted in order to retain the book's page numbering. To jump to a section from the table of contents, click your mouse on the section title.

    Welcome to the CD-ROM edition of the Pressure Vessel Handbook.

  • WARNING!WARNING!

    This document is copyright 1997 by Pressure Vessels Inc., and may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission.

    It is intended for single user use. Information about site licenses and network use may be obtained by contacting:

    Pressure Vessels Incorporated P.O. Box 35365 Tulsa, OK 74153 USA

    www.pressure-vessel.com

  • P VH

    T e n t hE d i t i o

    withforeword byP B

    Professor of Chemical EngineeringUniversity of TulsaTulsa, Oklahoma

    E M

    PRESSURE VESSEL PUBLISHING, INC.P.O. Box 35365 Tulsa, OK 74153

  • FOREWORD

    Engineers who design equipment for the chemical process industryare sooner or later confronted with the design of pressure vessels andmounting requirements for them. This is very often a frustratingexperience for anyone who has not kept up with current literaturein the field of code requirements and design equations.

    First he must familiarize himself with the latest version of theapplicable code. Then he must search the literature for techniquesused in design to meet these codes. Finally he must select materialproperties and dimensional data from various handbooks and companycatalogs for use in the design equations.

    Mr. Megyesy has recognized this problem. For several years hehas been accumulating data on code requirements and calculationalmethods. He has been presenting this information first in the formof his Calculation Form Sheets and now has put it all together inone place in the Pressure Vessel Handbook.

    I believe that this fills a real need in the pressure vessel industryand that readers will find it extremely useful.

    Paul Buthod

  • PREFACE

    This reference book is prepared for the purpose of making formulas,technicaldata,designandconstruction methods readily available for thedesigner, detailer, Iayoutmen and others dealing with pressure vessels.Practical men in this industry often have difficulty finding the requireddata and solutions, these being scattered throughout extensive literatureor advanced studies. The authors aim was to bring together all of theabove material under one cover and present it in a convenient form.

    The design procedures and formulas of the ASME Code for PressureVessels, Section VIII Division I have been utilized as well as thosegenerally accepted sources which are not covered by this Code. Fromamong the alternative construction methods described by the Code theauthor has selected those which are most frequently used in practice.

    In order to provide the greatest serviceability with this Handbook,rarely occurring loadings, special construction methods or materials havebeen excluded from its scope. Due to the same reason this Handbookdeals only with vessels constructed from ferrous material by welding,since the vast majority of the pressure vessels are in this category.

    A large part of this book was taken from the works of others, with someof the material placed in different arrangement, and some unchanged.

    The author wishes to acknowledge his indebtedness to ProfessorS4ndor Kalinszky, J&os Bodor, Lasz16F61egyhiizyand J6zsef Gyorii fortheir material and valuable suggestions, to the American Society ofMechanical Engineers and to the publishers, who generously permittedthe author to include material from their publications.

    The authorwishesalso to thank all those whohelpedto improvethisnew edition by their suggestions and corrections.

    Suggestions and criticism concerning some errors which may remainin spite of all precautions shall be greatly appreciated. They contribute tothe further improvement of this Handbook.

    Eugene F. Megyesy

  • 9CONTENTS

    PARTI Design and Construction of Pressure Vessels .................................... 11

    PARTII Geometry and Layout of Pressure Vessels ...................................... 257

    PARTIII Measures and Weights .................................................................... 321

    PARTIV Design of Steel Structures .............................................................. 447

    PARTV Miscellaneous ................................................................................. 465

  • PART L

    DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF PRESSURE VESSEL

    1. VesselsUnderinternalPressure_~__~~_~~~~~~~..~.~~~~ti~ti~~~~. 15StressesinCylindricalShel~Definitions,Formulas,PressureofFluid, Pressure-TemperatureRatings of American Standard,CarbonSteelPipe Flanges.

    2. Vessels Under External Pressure .......................................................... 31Definitions, Formulas, Minimum Required TicknessofCylin-dricalSheH,ChafiforDeteminingThicknessofCylindrical andSphericalVesselsunderExternal PressurewhenConstructedofCarbon Steel,

    3. Design ofTall Towers .......................................................................... 52Wind Load, Weight of Vessel, Seismic Load, Vibration, Eccen-tric Load, Elastic Stability, Deflection, Combination of Stresses,Design of Skirt Support, Design of Anchor Bolts (approximatemethod), Design of Base Ring (approximate method), Design ofAnchor Bold and Base Ring, Anchor Bolt Chair for Tall Towers.

    4. Vessel Suppotis ..................................................................................... 86Stresses in Large Horizontal Vessels Supported by Two Saddles,Stresses in Vessels on Leg Support, Stresses in Vessels Due toLug support.

    5. Openings ............................................................................................... 122Inspection Openings, Openings without Reinforcing Pad, Open-ing with Reinforcing Pad, Extension of Openings, Reinforce-ment of Openings, Strength of Attachments, Joining Openings toVessels, Length of Couplings and Pipes for Openings.

    6. Nozzle Loads ........................................................................................ 1537. Reinforcement at the Junction of Cone to Cylinder .............................. 159

    8. Welding of Pressure Vessels ................................................................. 170Welded Joints, But Welded Joint of Plates of Unequal Thick-nesses, Application of Welding Symbols.

    9. Regulations, Specifications ................................................................... 181Code Rules Related to Various Services, Code Rules Related toVarious Plate Thicknesses of Vessel, Tanks and Vessels Con-taining Flammable and Combustible Liquids, Properties ofMaterials, Description of Materials, Specification for The De-sign and Fabrication of Pressure Vessels, Fabrication Toler-ances.

    10. Materials of Foreign Countries ............................................................. 194

    11. Welded Tanks ....................................................................................... 204

  • 13. Rectangular Tanks ................................................................................ 21214. Corrosion .............................................................................................. 22115. Miscellaneous ... ... .... .. . . . ..~...o..o...u,mv..u.mv..~..u...ti..~..~..~..u..~ 232

    Fabricating Capacities, Pipe and Tube Bending, Pipe Engage-merit, Drill Sizes for Pipe Taps, Bend Allowances, LengthofStud Bolts, Pressure Vessel Detailing, Preferred Locations,CommonErrors,LiRingAttachments, SafeLoadsforRopesandChains, Transportation ofVessels.

    16. Painting Steel Surfaces ..~...o..o...~....a...~. U.V......O... 247

    1NREFERENCESTHROUGHOUTTHISBOOK"CODE"sTANDSF0RASME(AMERICAN S O C I E T YO FM E C H A N I C A LE N G I N E E R S )B O I L E RA N DP R E S S U R EV E S S E LC O D ES E C T I O NV I I IR U L E SF O RC O N S T R U C T I O NO FP R E S S U R EV E S S E L S ,D I V I S I O N1 A NA M E R I C A NS T A N D A R D .

    1 E

  • S P VPressure vessels are subject to various loadings, which exert stresses of

    different intensities in the vessel components. The category and intensity ofstresses are the function of the nature of loadings, the geometry and construc-tion of the vessel components.

    LOADINGS (Code UG-22)a,

    b.c.

    d.e.

    f.g

    Internal or external pressureWeight of the vessel and contentsStatic reactions fromattached equipment, piping, lining, insulation, internals,supportsCyclic and dynamic reactions due to pressure or thermal variationsWind pressure and seismic forcesImpact reactions due to fluid shockTemperature gradients and differential thermal expansion

    STRESSES (Code UG-23)a. Tensile stressb. Longitudinal compressive stress

    c. General primary membrane stressinduced by any combination ofloadings. Primary membranestress plus primary bending stressinduced by combination of load-ings, except as provided in d. be-low.

    d. General primary membrane stressinduced by combination of earth-quake or wind pressure with otherloadings (See definitions pagesbeginn-ing473.)

    MAXIMUMALLOWABLE STRESS

    SaThe smaller of S. or the value of

    factor B determined by the proceduredescribed in Code UG 23 (b) (2)

    S1.5 Sa

    1.2 times the stress permitted in a., b.,or c. This rule applicable to stressesexerted by internal or external pres-sure or axial compressive load on acylinder.

    Seismic force and wind pressure need not be considered to act simulta-neously.

    S.= Maximum allowable stress in