Retirement Redefined Q1

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The first edition of our Informational Magazzine targeting Seniors.

Transcript of Retirement Redefined Q1

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    Scott MacGregorPhysical Therapist-Dir.

    of Rehab Services

    Becky ClarkOccupational

    Therapist Assistant

    Sharon ButlerSpeech/Language

    Pathologist

    Erna HarmsOccupational

    Therapist

    Mae LandeOccupational

    Therapist Assistant

    Patrick HesslerPhysicalTherapist

    Stephanie McVeyPhysical Therapist

    Assistant

    Nikki MacGregorPhysical Therapist

    Assistant

    Sue PetersonPhysicalTherapist

    Caren ImadaOccupational

    Therapist

    Outpatient & InpatientPhysical, Occupational & Speech Therapies Skilled Nursing

    Comprehensive therapy evaluations and Individual treatment programs:

    Orthopedics:Fractures, Total Joint Replacements & Spine Surgery

    Cardiopulmonary:COPD/Bronchitis, Pneumonia, Heart Surgery

    Acute Debility:Generalized Weakness, Balance Issues & Prolonged Illness

    Neurological Issues:Stroke, Brain Trauma, Difficulty Swallowing, Parkinsons, Speech & Cognition Disorders, MS, and DiabetesCompassion Integrity Experience

    Maximizing the potential and independence of those we serve!

    JESSICA KELLERARGUS OBSERVER

    ONTARIOAlthough Treasure Valley Community

    College regularly turns out students withassociates degrees and plans for the futureevery year, not all classes are for credit andnot all students attend with plans to grad-uate.

    A small but very important part of thecommunity colleges mission is to providethe extended community with continuingopportunities to learn, including seniorcitizens.

    And some of the most popular coursesspecifically for seniors take place, not in aregular classroom, but in the computerlab.

    This quarter, a group of seniors and afew nonseniors are wrapping up a class oncomputer basics, which is an introductorycomputer course that provides the essen-

    tial knowledge needed to operate a com-puter.

    The week before Valentines Day, mostof the hour and a half class was dedicatedto taking images on a computer and incor-porating them into a Microsoft program tocreate cards they could take home. Therest of the class time was dedicated to an-swering computer-related questions andreviewing basic computer lessons.

    Darlene Escobar, the instructor for thecourse, who has been teaching communi-ty computer-related courses for the pastsix years, said the courses are always verywell attended and designed perfectly forthe needs of her students.

    LaVonne Shaw, New Plymouth, a seniorwho was enrolled in the class for the firsttime, is familiar with and utilizesFacebook on her laptop computer athome, but her knowledge about the ma-

    A lifetime of learningClasses through Treasure Valley CommunityCollege help seniors navigate the digital world

    JESSICA KELLER | ARGUS OBSERVER

    Treasure Valley Community College computer instructor Darlene Escobar, whoteaches programs for the community education department, looks over theshoulder of Ed Hammon, Ontario, as he completes a project the students in thecomputer basics worked on during class. In its mission to provide continuing ed-ucational opportunities for people, the college offers classes that are specifical-ly designed with senior citizens in mind, like the computer basics class.CONTINUED ON PAGE E4

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    E3EASTERN OREGON CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING

    Disability Resource and Advocacy Center

    Eastern Oregon Center for Independent Living (EOCIL) is a disabilityresource and advocacy center that promotes independence, inclusion,

    equality and opportunities for people with disabilities and seniors.

    EOCIL offers individualized services that include: Information andReferral, Peer Counseling, Life Skills Training, Advocacy, Life

    Transitioning and much more

    Do you need help with an issue and not sure what to do or where to turn forhelp? Do you rely on others and want your independence back?

    Contact usWe may be able to help.

    For complete list of services and descriptions please visit www.eocil.org

    SERVICES AVAILABLE

    EOCIL has three locations:

    1021 SW 5th Avenue, Ontario, Oregon541-889-3119 Voice

    711 RelayToll Free: 1-866-248-8369

    322 SW 3rd Street, Suite 6Pendleton, Oregon

    Web Page: www.eocil.orgEmail: eocil@eocil.org

    541-276-1037711 Relay

    Toll Free: 1-877-711-1037

    400 East Scenic Drive, Suite 2.349P.O. Box 422

    The Dalles, Oregon 97058(541) 370-2810 (Voice)(541) 370-2811 (Fax)

    711 (Relay)1-855-516-6273 (Toll Free)

    Providing Services in:Harney, Malheur, Baker, Union, Grant, Wallowa, Umatilla, Morrow, Wheeler,

    Gilliam, Wasco, Sherman and Hood River Counties.

    Information and ReferralIndependent Living Skills Training

    Peer CounselingIndividual Systems Advocacy

    Life TransitionsEmployment Services

    Benefits AnalysisBrainTrain (Memory Enhancement)Assistive Technology Loan Project

    ADA Technical AssistanceYouth Mentoring Project

    Representative Payee ProjectEmergency Financial Assistance

    Wellness ProjectSocial and Recreation Project

    HIV/AIDS ProjectAnd many other services

    Retirement Redefined:Senior learning...............................................E2Dont get scammed........................................E3Volunteering...................................................E5Senior vaccinations........................................E6Fitness in the golden years.........................E10Dealing with hearing loss ...........................E12

    WILLIAM ANDERSONARGUS OBSERVER

    ONTARIOIt could start as simple as a phone call

    claiming to be a loved one, asking forhelp.

    The results could be disastrous.There are many different schemes and

    plots to separate senior citizens from theirmoney.

    The schemes could be done over thephone, in the mail, at your front door andon the Internet, including e-mail.

    To keep these scammers from yourhard-earned money, there are a few simplerules to follow.

    The first, and maybe most obvious, is if itsounds too good to be true, it probably is.

    They are (going on) all the time,Ontario Interim Police Chief MarkAlexander said about scams targeting theelderly. The big ones are on the Internetand over the telephone. They have thesame basis, just different variations ofthem. They usually involve somebodywho wants money or feels they are entitledto it somehow.

    Early in February, there was a series oftelephone scams that took place on thewestern side of Oregon, resulting in seniorcitizens losing up to $6,000.

    The scammers continued to try and findvictims but ran out of luck when they con-tacted a woman from Umatilla County.

    The scam started with a man claiming tobe an FBI agent calling to conduct a fraud

    investigation that had occurred withPublishers Clearing House. The lady onthe other end of the phone was informedin order to receive her money, all she need-ed was to send a refundable security de-posit of $3,000 via Western Union. TheFBI agent also informed the victim thata person with the Oregon State Policewould contact her to verify the authentic-ity of the telephone call.

    A couple hours later, the woman re-ceived another phone call, claiming to besomebody from the OSP office inPendleton, and the number showed up onher caller ID. After this phone call, thewoman called back the Oregon StatePolice office to report the calls. She wasinformed the calls were an attempt to scamher out of money.

    After the incidents occurred, OSP sentout a scam warning and gave a few tips toavoid becoming a victim of fraud.

    The first tip is dont give out personal orfinancial information to someone whocalls you. If you are unsure, hang up andcall the law enforcement agency who thecaller is saying they work for. Second, be-ware of high pressure techniques, such asthe need to give information or make animmediate decision. Finally, if it soundstoo good to be true, it probably is.

    On the Better Business Bureau Web site,there are a list of the top 10 scams that arecurrently going on and ways to avoidthese scams.

    Targeting seniors:Make sure you dont fall victim to scam artists

    CONTINUED ON PAGE E13

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    Call for your appointment

    473 SW 12th St., Ontario Behind Chevron541- 889-3282

    Emergency Repairs While You Wait Payment Options Available

    zz We accept Oregon & Idaho Medicaid zz Most dental insurance accepted

    Come in and talk to Kevinabout these common worries:

    FIT APPEARANCE

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    Custom made denturesare done on-site or in our

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    Kevin Tatlock, Denturist

    Flexible PartialsAvailable With No

    Showing Metal

    chine was otherwise limited. Shaw saidshe wants to be able to use her laptop tocreate personal calendars with pictures onthem. She said she initially asked herdaughter for help, and her daughter final-ly recommended Shaw take a class. Herson, Shaw said, gave her the class forChristmas.

    I just needed to learn the basics of t