Rethinking Film (STL in STL 2015)

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Transcript of Rethinking Film (STL in STL 2015)

Rethinking Film

Rethinking FilmContact Info:ttourais@micds.orgTex TouraisMary Institute & Country Day SchoolSt. Louis, MO

2009 iStock International Inc.01 - Film as Artifact - Horror Openings (11.26)Discuss Horror & the Locus of CorruptionFocus on Audience Participation to establish that we have the skills we need to read filmTransition to Audience Concerns (Ability to read film; Software & Copyright; What is the pay-off for the expense of time?)Transition to Objectives1

Narrative & POVSetting & MoodCharacterizationPlotImagery & Figurative LanguageSyntax, Diction & ToneVoiceover / The Cameras EyeThe NarratorIncludes Non-diegetic soundEditingIncludes diegetic soundWord Choice/ArrangementThemes

The Reader & RealityMeaning

2009 iStock International Inc.Linguistic (adj): the use of language, written and/or spokenVisual (adj): the use of images or other characteristics (color, layout, style, size, perspective) seen by the readerAural (adj): the use of sound, including speech, tone, emphasis, accent, volume, music, effects or ambient noises and even silenceSpatial (adj): the physical arrangement of the text, which revolves around organization and proximityGestural (adj): the way movement and body language can create meaning through facial expression, hand gestures, or interaction2

Proximity |

closeness in the space

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Alignment|controlling the eye as it moves across the text

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Organization|arrangement of elements to form a whole

2009 iStock International Inc.Contrast|combining differing elements to create meaning

2009 iStock International Inc.

Contrast|combining differing elements to create meaning

2009 iStock International Inc.

Contrast|combining differing elements to create meaning

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Emphasis|signifying certain elements to guide the reader

2009 iStock International Inc.ObjectivesFilm as ReproductionFilm as ArtifactFilm as Commentary

2009 iStock International Inc.The goal here is to clearly articulate three different uses for film in the classroom to establish the different array of tools at your disposal. Towards that end, each teacher is encouraged to identify 1 element of our curriculum from the past year that didnt quite work (or from a new class thats making us nervous). The question of this presentation is: Could film help? (2-3 mins)10

ObjectivesFilm as ReproductionParallel ContentParallel SkillsFilm as ArtifactFilm as CommentarySoftware & Copyright

2009 iStock International Inc.Although we typically think of film exclusively in terms of the first one (content-based), its really the second & third that are most interesting and fertile, and they actually scaffold the first to produce better results. We have to start thinking of scaffolding experience in terms of viewing just as we do with reading and writing. Humanities is a perspective that can be applied to anything, once the rules are established.11

Parallel ContentClips which are clearly connected to the subject matter of the course, which derive their relevance from reinforcing content

2009 iStock International Inc.If the film parallels the content (as in the case of Shakespeare or a documentary on a subject under discussion), the film should come first and should generate the question and concerns that the reading will help to answer. Doing it second privileges the film and asserts the wrong relations (film is for preliminary understanding, reading gives us the deep dive)

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Parallel ContentClips which are clearly connected to the subject matter of the course, which derive their relevance from reinforcing content

2009 iStock International Inc.Ian Jukes: Digital Agers prefer processing pictures, sounds, video BEFORE text. Teachers prefer going the other way. We think of the images complimenting the text; they think of the text as complimenting the image. Actually, BOTH perspectives suggest that the film clip should be seen first. Viewing the clip 2nd actually privileges the viewing experience over the reading.

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Parallel Content

http://www.beatdom.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/07/Walt_Whitman_edit_2.jpg

2009 iStock International Inc.There are other types of parallel content, however: 03 - P Content - Pioneers, O Pioneers (1.02).wmv & 02 - P Content - Lincoln and Morality (6.56).wmv14

Parallel SkillsClips which provide practice for a foundational skill or which derive their relevance from articulating a new critical lens

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Parallel SkillsClips which provide practice for a foundational skill or which derive their relevance from articulating a new critical lens

2009 iStock International Inc.04 - P Skills - Setting and Mood - Free Fall (Excerpt) (1.22) vs. 05 - P Skills - Setting and Mood - One Last Dive (1.08)16

1. ExperienceNew data enters the brain via the senses.

Washburn, Kevin D. The Architecture of Learning: Designing Instruction for the Learning Brain. New York. Clerestory Press, 2010.

2009 iStock International Inc.2. ComprehensionPatterns emerge from labeling and sorting data.

Washburn, Kevin D. The Architecture of Learning: Designing Instruction for the Learning Brain. New York. Clerestory Press, 2010.

2009 iStock International Inc.3. ElaborationPattern recognitionTriggers recall of relevant info inlong-term memory.

L.T.M.

Washburn, Kevin D. The Architecture of Learning: Designing Instruction for the Learning Brain. New York. Clerestory Press, 2010.

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4. Conceptual BlendingConnections between new and known data emerge.

L.T.M.

Washburn, Kevin D. The Architecture of Learning: Designing Instruction for the Learning Brain. New York. Clerestory Press, 2010.

2009 iStock International Inc.Reading Hierarchy3. Elaboration2. Comprehension1. Experience5. Organized Sensory Data4. Conceptual BlendingBarrier: Vocabulary & DictionBarrier: Sorting ErrorBarrier: Data Not FoundEnd Goal

2009 iStock International Inc.What we read isnt as important as how we read (new brain research suggests our brains are doing completely different things during pleasure and academic reading)New critical lens: Kuleshov Effect (AND, the film theory is actually in line with Ian Jukes: The digital content creators (our kids when they grow up) will need to be able to express themselves this way in order reach their peers. This is actually more in-line with our visual processing skills, learned through millions of years of evolution.)

Compare watching the entirety of Merchant of Venice to the Ian McKellan clip21

The Kuleshov Effect

http://www.doctormacro.com/Images/Hitchcock,%20Alfred/Annex/Annex%20-%20Hitchcock,%20Alfred_23.jpg

2009 iStock International Inc.Contextualization: 05(Supplemental) - P Skills - Context - The Kuleshov Effect (1.18)22

2. Film as Artifact

2009 iStock International Inc.Circle back to Horror Intro / Invader Zim & 9/11 (1.56)Moves quickly through time to uncover cultural patterns (Horror Openings, Different Perspectives on Same Event, Different Perspectives on Same Text) Moves us quickly across cultures (showing adaptations of the same material from various cultures, World Lang Applications)The idea is not to show the entire film, its to show the sequence that initiates the discussion or exposes the shifts in perspectivesIdentify context/perspective piece & use film to present shifting cultures: For Invader Zim:What are the facts? You be the historian, or just show different takes on the same moment from different eras, cultures, etc. (also World Lang. connection)Implications for Science as we present flawed understandings of our world

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3. Film as Commentary

2009 iStock International Inc.Back to Merchant (McKellen) (1.52) and into Gatsby: Three Worlds (9.19) (What were looking for is different takes on the same source material)Raisin in the Sun example (we watched 1 viewing of the film from two different adaptations, both were available to the students, virtually every student decided to watch a full version on their own) (This was for a Clybourne Park unit, we recall)Its not about what you read; its about how you readBrain research shows that pleasure reading is fundamentally different from focused reading

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Monday:Raisin 1961 & 2008 (first 5:00)HW: 1961, Act I.i & Asagi (36:00)Tuesday:Raisin 2008, Exit Asagi-II.iii (60:00)HW: Act III, Student Choice (22.00)Raisin in the Sun ScheduleWednesday:Discuss RaisinHW: Clybourne Park (pgs. 1-50)

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Fri:3 Midsummers (Act I.i: 22m)Monday:MechanicalsHW:(I.ii: 28m)Tues:Read Act I.iiHW:(II.i: 28m)Wed:Read Act II.iHW: Choice(II.ii-III.i: 21m)Mon:Read Act III.iHW:(III.ii: 31m)Thurs:IV.i-IV.ii(24m)HW:Read IV.i-IV.iiFri:V.i (49m)HW:Read V.iThurs:Read Act II.iiiWed:Discuss III.iiHW:Read III.iiFri:DropTues:DropMidsummer Schedule

2009 iStock International Inc.Common CoreCCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.7Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.)http://www.corestandards.org

2009 iStock International Inc.Common CoreCCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.9Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more