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  • DOCUMENT RESUME

    ED 468 124 HE 035 204

    AUTHOR Horn, Laura; Peter, Katharin; Rooney, Kathryn

    TITLE Profile of Undergraduates in U.S. Postsecondary Institutions: 1999-2000. Statistical Analysis Report. National Postsecondary Student Aid Study.

    INSTITUTION National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    REPORT NO NCES-2002-168 PUB DATE 2002-07-00

    NOTE 186p.; Project officer, Andrew G. Malizio. For the 1995 profile of undergraduates, see ED 392 852.

    AVAILABLE FROM ED Pubs, P.O. Box 1398, Jessup, MD 20794-1398. Tel: 877 -433- 7827 (Toll Free).

    PUB TYPE Numerical/Quantitative Data (110) Reports Descriptive (141)

    EDRS PRICE EDRS Price MF01/PC08 Plus Postage. DESCRIPTORS Age Differences; Demography; Disabilities; Educational

    Attainment; Educational Finance; *Enrollment; Higher Education; National Surveys; Profiles; Sex Differences; *Student Characteristics; Student Financial Aid; Tables (Data); *Undergraduate Students

    ABSTRACT

    This report profiles undergraduates who were enrolled in U.S. postsecondary institutions in the academic year 1999-2000. It is based on data from the 1999-2000 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000), the fifth in a series of surveys conducted by the U.S. Department of Education. Each NPSAS survey is a comprehensive nationwide study to determine how students and their families pay for postsecondary education. The report begins with an overview that describes the demographic diversity of the undergraduate population. In particular, it documents gender, age, race/ethnicity, parenthood, and the disability status of undergraduates. The overview is followed by a compendium of tables describing in detail all undergraduates with respect to enrollment, student characteristics, financial aid receipt, participation in community service, and remedial coursetaking. The estimates in this report were produced using the National Center for Education Statistics Data Analysis System, a microcomputer application that allows users to specify and generate tables for the NPSAS:2000 undergraduate survey. This profile suggests that the postsecondary education system in the United States offers opportunities to a diversegroup of individuals. In spite of the enrollment opportunities, however, gaining access to postsecondary education does not necessarily lead to obtaining a degree or certificate. (Contains 9 figures, 45 tables, and 17 references.) (SLD)

    Reproductions supplied by EDRS are the best that can be made from the original document.

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  • " NCES.%":/ National Center for Education Statistics

    National Postsecondary Student Aid Study

    U.S. Department of Education Office of Educational Research and Improvement NCES 2002-168

    Profile of Undergraduates in U.S. Postsecondary Institutions: 1999-2000

    Statistical Analysis Report

    July 2002

    Laura Horn Katharin Peter Kathryn Rooney MPR Associates, Inc.

    Andrew G. Malizio Project Officer National Center for Education Statistics

  • U.S. Department of Education Rod Paige Secretary

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement Grover J.Whitehurst Assistant Secretary

    National Center for Education Statistics Gary W. Phillips Deputy Commissioner

    The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) is the primary federal entity for collecting, analyzing, and reporting data related to education in the United States and other nations. It fulfills a congressional mandate to collect, collate, analyze, and report full and complete statistics on the condition of education in the United States; conduct and publish reports and specialized analyses of the meaning and significance of such statistics; assist state and local education agencies in improving their statistical systems; and review and report on education activities in foreign countries.

    NCES activities are designed to address high priority education data needs; provide consistent, reliable, complete, and accurate indicators of education status and trends; and report timely, useful, and high quality data to the U.S. Department of Education, the Congress, the states, other education policymakers, practitioners, data users, and the general public.

    We strive to make our products available in a variety of formats and in language that is appropriate to a variety of audiences.You, as our customer, are the best judge of our success in communicating information effectively. If you have any comments or suggestions about this or any other NCES product or report, we would like to hear from you. Please direct your comments to:

    National Center for Education Statistics Office of Educational Research and Improvement U.S. Department of Education 1990 K Street NW Washington, DC 20006-5651

    July 2002

    The NCES World Wide Web Home Page address is http://nces.ed.gov The NCES World Wide Web Electronic Catalog is: httalinces.ed.gov/pubsearch

    Suggested Citation

    U.S. Department of Education. National Center for Education Statistics. Profile of Undergraduates in U.S. Postsecondary Institutions: 1999 -2000, NCES 2002-168 by Laura Horn, Katharin Peter, and Kathryn Rooney. Project Officer:Andrew G. Malizio. Washington, DC: 2002.

    For ordering information on this report, write:

    U.S. Department of Education ED Pubs P.O. Box 1398 Jessup, MD 20794-1398

    Or call toll free 1-877-4ED-Pubs

    Content Contact: Aurora D'Amico (202) 502-7334 Aurora .D'Amico@ecl .gov

    5

  • Executive Summary

    Postsecondary education in the United States encompasses a wide array of educational opportu- nities and programs. U.S. undergraduates attend postsecondary institutions that range from 4-year colleges and universities offering programs lead- ing to baccalaureate and higher degrees to private for-profit vocational institutions offering occupa- tional training of less than 1 year. This report pro- vides a detailed statistical overview of the approximately 16.5 million undergraduates en- rolled in all U.S. postsecondary institutions in 1999-2000. Preceding the detailed statistical ta- bles is a discussion of the undergraduate popula- tion's diversity and the possible impact of this diversity on persistence in postsecondary educa- tion.

    This report is based on data from the 1999- 2000 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS:2000), a survey representing all students enrolled in postsecondary education in 1999- 2000.

    Who Were 1999-2000 Undergraduates?

    Taking into account enrollments at all U.S. postsecondary institutions, women comprised 56 percent of undergraduates in 1999-2000 (figure A). Minority students represented about one-third of the total undergraduate population, including 12 percent Black, 11 percent Hispanic, and 5 per- cent Asian.' Roughly 2 percent of undergraduates

    'Census categories for race and ethnicity were used in the NPSAS survey, which included the terms "Black or African

    were either American Indian/Alaska Natives (0.9 percent) or Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Island- ers (0.8 percent). And about 2 percent indicated that they were of more than one race.

    Among Hispanic undergraduates, Mexican, Mexican American, or Chicano students made up the largest group (55 percent versus 4 to 27 per- cent for other Hispanic groups). Among Asian undergraduates, Chinese students made up the largest group (25 percent versus 3 to 13 percent for other Asian groups).

    While a majority of undergraduates were younger than 24, about one in four were 30 or older. The average age of undergraduates was 26 and the median age was 22.

    About 7 percent of undergraduates were not U.S. citizens. Of these noncitizens, 5 percent were permanent residents, and 2 percent were foreign students. Undergraduates who were born in an- other country, immigrated to the United States, and became citizens comprised 4 percent of un- dergraduates (figure B). One in ten undergradu- ates were born in the United States but had at least one foreign-born parent. In addition, 13 percent of undergraduates spoke a language other than Eng-

    lish in the home while growing up.

    American" and "Hispanic or Latino." By convention, the terms Black and Hispanic are used in the text. Unless other- wise noted, when discussing race, Black and White estimates do not include individuals of Hispanic ethnicity.

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  • Executive Summary

    Figure A.Percentage distributions of 1999-2000 undergraduates, by gender, age, and race/ethnicity

    Women

    Gender

    Men

    Race/ethnicity

    Black, non-Hispanic

    40 or older

    30-39

    Age

    18 or younger

    24-29

    White, non-Hispanic

    Average age = 26

    19-23

    1% American Indian/Alaska Native 1% Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander 1% Other 2% More than one race

    *Priority was given to Hispanic ethnicity regardless of race chosen.

    NOTE: Percentages may not add to 100 due to rounding.

    SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for E