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  • DOCUMENT RESUME

    ED 480 908 UD 035 887

    AUTHOR Kosar, Kevin R., Ed.

    TITLE Bridging the Gap: Higher Education and Career-Centered Welfare Reform. Proceedings.

    INSTITUTION National Urban League, Inc., New York, NY. SPONS AGENCY College Board, New York, NY.; City Univ. of New York,

    Brooklyn. Medgar Evers Coll.

    PUB DATE 2003-00-00

    NOTE 145p.; Produced with Metropolitan College of New York. Additional support from National Black Caucus of State Legislators.

    AVAILABLE FROM For full text: http://www.metropolitan.edu/pdfs/ BridgingTheGap.pdf.

    PUB TYPE Collected Works Proceedings (021) Reports Descriptive (141)

    EDRS PRICE EDRS Price MF01/PC06 Plus Postage.

    DESCRIPTORS *Career Development; Federal Legislation; *Higher Education; Low Income Groups; Mothers; Nontraditional Students; *Welfare Recipients; *Welfare Reform

    IDENTIFIERS Barriers to Participation; State Policy; Welfare to Work Programs

    ABSTRACT

    This conference examined the current welfare policy and the continued use of higher education as a tool for moving low-income people into self-supporting careers. The proceedings include: welcoming remarks by Stephen Greenwald; keynote addresses by William Spriggs and Danny Simmons; a lunch address by Rae Alexander-Minter; remarks by Patricia White; and closing remarks by William Spriggs. The other conference presentations are: "Federal Law and State Policy Barriers to Higher Education as Work" (Hector R. Cordero-Guzman, Aurora Jackson, Gwendolynne Moore, Linda Gordon, Lawrence Mead, Judy Williams, and Christina DeMeo); "Welfare Mothers, Non-Traditional Students and College" (Kenya Cox, Susan Gooden, Lisa Grossman, Florence Washington, and Vanessa Ratliff); "Programs and Models that Work" (Esmeralda Simmons, Rae Mack, Vivyan Adair, Henry Buhl, and Kathryn K. Johnson); and "Afterword: Welfare Reform: What is Happening in Congress" (Kevin R. Kosar). (Contains 10 bibliographic references.) (SM)

    Reproductions supplied by EDRS are the best that can be made from the original document.

  • Proceedings

    Bridging the Gap: Higher Education and Career-Centered Welfare Reform

    A conference convened by Metropolitan College of New York

    the National Urban League Medgar Evers College The College Board and

    the National Black Caucus of State Legislators

    METROPOIJTAN COLLEGE

    OF NEW YORK

    BEST COPY AVAILABLE 0

    ® NATIONAL URBAN LEAGUE

    1

    PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE AND DISSEMINATE THIS MATERIAL HAS

    BEEN GRANTED BY

    C . $ct loson Na.ft 1Volvtu ot,

    TO THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER (ERIC)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Educational Research and Improvement

    EDU ATONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER (ERIC)

    This document has been reproduced as received from the person or organization originating it.

    0 Minor changes have been made to improve reproduction quality.

    Points of view or opinions stated in this document do not necessarily represent official OERI position or policy.

  • On November 18, 2002, Metropolitan College of New York (MCNY), the National Urban League (NUL), Medgar Evers College (CUNY), the National Black Caucus of State Legislators, and The College Board hosted a one-day conference at MCNY. Bridging the Gap: Higher Education and Career-Centered Welfare Reform, examined the current welfare policy and considered the use of higher education as a tool for moving low-income persons into self-supporting careers.

    Bridging the Gap panelists and speakers included academics, experts in the area of welfare reform, and policymakers. Panelists assessed the problems of current welfare policy as it relates to work, education, and parenting. Students affected by public assistance policies also were present and testified. The conference attendees discussed several models already in use for moving welfare recipients and low-income workers into meaningful and sustained careers.

    These proceedings have been published in hopes that legislators considering further reform of welfare policy will consider the importance of education in breaking inter- generational poverty and producing self-reliant citizens.

    The proceedings were edited by Prof. Kevin R. Kosar (MCNY) with assistance from Kevin Curley, Assistant Director for Governmental and Public Affairs (MCNY). This document was copyedited by Stephen McCluskey (MCNY). The cover of the proceedings was designed by Michael Thompson (MCNY). The publication and conference were made possible by the generous assistance of Metropolitan College of New York and the National Urban League (NUL) and the efforts of MCNY, NUL, The College Board, Medgar Evers College (CUNY), and the National Black Caucus of State Legislators. We also thank the Joyce Foundation for their support.

    The opinions expressed herein are those of the panelists and should not be attributed to the sponsoring institutions.

    Metropolitan College of New York 75 Varick Street New York, NY 10013-1919 212-343-1234

    National Black Caucus of State Legislators 444 North Capitol Street, NW, Suite 622 Washington, DC 20001 202-624-5457

    The College Board 1233 20th Street NW Washington, DC 20036-2304 202-822-5900

    National Urban League 120 Wall Street New York, NY 10005-3901 212-558-5300

    Medgar Evers College (CUNY) 1150 Carroll Street, Rm CP28 Brooklyn, NY 11225 718-270-6471

  • CONTENTS

    Welcoming Remarks: Stephen Greenwald

    Keynote Address: William Spriggs, National Urban League

    Keynote Address: Danny Simmons

    Questions and Answers

    1

    3

    12

    14

    Panel I: Federal Law and State Policy Barriers to Higher Education as Work 20 Hector R. Cordero-Guzman, Baruch College (CUNY) Aurora Jackson, University of Pittsburgh Gwendolynne Moore, Wisconsin State Senator Linda Gordon, New York University Lawrence Mead, New York University Judy Williams, Maine Bureau of Family Independence Cristina DiMeo, Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies

    Questions and Answers 57

    Lunch Address: Rae Alexander-Minter Interviews Yvonne Rhem-Tittle 72

    Panel II: Welfare Mothers, Non-Traditional Students and College Kenya Cox, National Urban League Susan Gooden, Virginia Tech Lisa Grossman, National Governors Association Florence Washington, Medgar Evers College (CUNY) Vanessa Ratliff Metropolitan College of New York

    78

    Questions and Answers 100

    Panel III: Programs and Models That Work Esmeralda Simmons, Medgar Evers College (CUNY) Rae Mack, Metropolitan College of New York Vivyan Adair, Hamilton College Henry Buhl, Association of Community Employment Programs for the Homeless Kathryn K Johnson, Stay in School Project

    Questions and Answers

    Remarks by Patricia White, New York Community Trust

    Closing Remarks by William Spriggs, National Urban League

    Afterward: Welfare Reform: What Is Happening in Congress? by Kevin R. Kosar

    Brief Bibliography

    4

    107

    122

    132

    136

    137

    140

  • WELCOMING REMARKS: STEPHEN GREENWALD

    Stephen R. Greenwald has served, since 1999, as the third president of Metropolitan College of New York. President Greenwald has committed the College to create an

    institutionalized forum for policy debate and analysis designed specifically to include the participation of New Yorkers who live with the consequences of public policy. He earned

    his L.L.M and L.L.B. degrees from New York University Law School.

    Thank you. Good morning. Welcome everyone. Welcome to Metropolitan

    College of New York (MCNY). To those of you who came from out of town and around

    the country, welcome to New York. I can tell you that this is the first ray of sunshine that

    we have seen in about 72 hours--so, hopefully, you brought some better weather to us.

    We are very happy to have you here today.

    Let me just speak for a moment about Metropolitan College of New York. The

    College was founded in 1964 by Audrey Cohen. She was an educational pioneer. Since

    our founding, the College has been offering students the opportunity to apply their

    classroom learning to the workplace as part of our unique Purpose-Centered System of

    Education and our model of experiential education. This system prepares students for the

    challenges of the global information and service-centered economy, which employs more

    than 80% of the American workforce. Over a three-semester calendar year, the College

    enrolls approximately 4,700 students and offers both baccalaureate and master's degrees

    in the fields of business and human services at four locations here in New York City.

    Metropolitan College of New York takes a special interest in the subject of this

    conference. Historically, the College has been dedicated to creating a more egalitarian

    society. Traditionally, a large number of our students work in or go into careers in

    human service agencies, non-profit organizations, government, and so forth. They work

    in positions that enable them to help those in need. Metropolitan College of New York

    1

    5

  • has a long history of educating persons on public assistance. Indeed, the College began

    as the Women's Talent Corps, a federally funded program started in 1964 by Audrey

    Cohen to move women (who were on welfare) into the workforce and on to economic

    self-sufficiency and dignity for themselves and for their families. We at Metropolitan

    College, along with our partners, Medgar Ever