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Transcript of Reproductions supplied by EDRS are the best that can be ... . FLORIDA HUNAN. RESOURCES. DEVELOPMENT

DOCUMENT RESUME

ED 435 206 FL 801 335

TITLE Crossroads Cafe English Learning Program: Reflecting a NewApproach to Teaching English.

INSTITUTION Florida Human Resources Development, Inc., Gainesville.PUB DATE 1997-12-00NOTE 15p.PUB TYPE Collected Works Serials (022) Reports Descriptive

(141)

JOURNAL CIT At Work; Dec 1997EDRS PRICE MF01/PC01 Plus Postage.DESCRIPTORS Adolescents; Course Content; Educational Strategies;

Educational Trends; *English (Second Language);*Instructional Materials; *Labor Force Development;Multimedia Instruction; Professional Development; ProgramDescriptions; Program Design; Second Language Instruction;Teaching Methods; Videotape Recordings

IDENTIFIERS Florida

ABSTRACTThis issue of a newsletter designed to promote human

resources development among adolescents and adults in Florida is devoted to adescription and assessment of "Crossroads Cafe," a series of multimediamaterials for English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instruction. Trends inlanguage teaching methodology since the 1960s are first reviewed, andprinciples underlying current trends are examined. Insights gained fromresearch in adult education are also discussed briefly. Ways in which the"Crossroads Cafe" program reflects this newer knowledge, and ways in whichthe "Crossroads Cafe" approach addresses workforce readiness skills, aresummarized. Workshops for teachers on the use of the materials are described.(Contains 15 references.) (Adjunct ERIC Clearinghouse on Literacy Education)(MSE)

Reproductions supplied by EDRS are the best that can be madefrom the original document.

OJ

ROSSROADS, CAF ENGLISHLEARNING RPGRA

REFLECTING A NEVI% APPROACH`TEACHING ENGLISH

BEST COPY AVAILABLE

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONOffice of Educational Research and Improvement

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATIONCENTER (ERIC)

This document has been reproduced asceived from the person or organization

originating it.

Minor changes have been made toimprove reproduction quality.

Points of view or opinions stated in thisdocument do not necessarily representofficial OERI position or policy. 2

1

PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE ANDDISSEMINATE THIS MATERIAL HAS

BEEN GRANTED BY

TO THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCESINFORMATION CENTER (ERIC)

MM.

FLORIDA HUNANRESOURCES

DEVELOPMENTNON-PROF/T CORPORA 110N

ome English as a Second Language

(ESL) Practitioners have seen the

Crossroads Cafe English Learning

Program and wonder why it is receiving so

much press, and why it has been so success-

ful in the state of Florida. The Florida

Department of Education and Florida

Human Resources Development, Inc. rec-

ognize that Crossroads Caf reflects evolu-

tionary progress in English teaching

methodology, and that the innovative

product requires active inservice training

to reach its potential as a teaching tool. In

an effort to help ESL practitioners under-

stand the changes that have taken place in

language teaching, and consequently the

need for inservice training, this publica-

tion addresses the following topics:

How does Crossroads Caf'English Learning Program: reflect anew approach to teaching English?

How does Crossroads Caf gobeyond language learning to meet themany needs of adult ESL learners?

How does Crossroads Caf cor-relate to workforce readiness skills(SCANS)?

What are the implications fromthe Crossroads Caf FloridaImplementation Evaluation?

What workshops are currentlyoffered by Florida Human ResourcesDevelopment, Inc.?

DECEMBER 1997

rAiSrArfoioliff"HELPING PEOPLE DOA BETTER JOB WITH PEOPLE"

CROSSROADS CAFE ENGLISHLEARNING PROGRAM:

REFLECTING A NEW APPROACHTO TEACHING ENGLISH

How HAS TEACHING METHODOLOGY CHANGED?

In the late 60's and 70's Audio-Lingual Methodology was therage. ALM was revolutionary in that it brought a much-neededshift from teaching with an emphasis on written language, toteaching with a focus on oral language. It seems obvious now thatone studies a language in order to SPEAK it, but before ALMemerged, most language instruction was based on written grammarexercises and text translation. This method of teaching was calledGrammar - Translation. (Brown, 1994). In many other countries,English is still being taught as a foreign language in this'way. Thinkof students who can read and write in English far better than theycan converse. They are products of Grammar-Translation teachingmethodology. Grammar-Translation and ALM were similar in thatthey both kept grammar at the center of instruction.

ALM comes from the behaviorist's theory which emphasizesforming habits and practicing grammar structures in isolation(Lightbrown & Spada, 1993). Instruction relies heavily on drillsand memorizing dialogues. One of the ideas behind drills andmemorization is that students can transfer the information in par-roted phrases from one context to another; for example, a teacherdrills the sentence "A wig is very practical on the beach." The stu-dents reproduce this sentence with native-like fluency.- In theory,the students are now able to use to-be verbs in the present tensewhen they attempt to create new language. Unfortunately, this isnot the case. When sentences are not relevant to real life experi-ence, students are not able to transfer the information into sen-tences of their own creation. Although ALM had some strongpoints, such as native-like pronunciation and lower speaking anxi-ety, it did not serve the initial purpose of oral communication aswell as originally hoped. In other' words, students could notexchange thoughts and ideas in the new language. Herein lie theroots of current trends in English teaching methodology..

In contrast to ALM, the Communicative Approach is firmlyembedded in innatist and interactionist theories of language learn-ing (Lightbrown, Spada, 1993). The Communicative Approach is

3

based on more natural or authentic interaction inthe target language. Think of it as the way inwhich students order. in a restaurant when they donot know the language. They. use limited vocabu-lary in combination with body gestures to com-municate. The waiter does much the same untilthe two come to some agreement. The success orfailure of the interaction is determined by whatcomes out of the kitchen. Either way, studentscome away from the restaurant with new vocabu-,lary (learned in context) and perhaps new lan-guage structures, "I want...," or " May I have?"This interaction is called negotiating meaning.The ability to use language and convey messagesin spite of grammatical accuracy is calledCommunicative Competence (Lightbrown &Spada). The Communicative Approach presuppos-es that because the interaction is meaningful, lan-guage structures and vocabulary are acquiredrather than consciously learned. It is also believedtht *developmentally appropriate grammar con-cepts are assimilated innately by an internal lan-guage mechanism. Examine the example of a con-versation between mother and child. A 14-month-old child points at .a bottle and says "ba-ba" Themother says: "Yes, this is your bottle. Do you wantyour bottle?" The baby smiles or nods and repeats"Ba-ba." The child happily receives the bottle.

CROSSROADS CAFE

IMPLEMENTATION FLORIDA TEAM

Olivia Fernandez

Rachel Porcelli

Jose Alvarino

Judy Langelier

Maria KoonceWilliam KoonceJudd ButlerTeri McleanMary B. PuleoTony Lagos

Hillsborough CountyDade CountyDade CountyPalm Beach County

Broward CountyBroward. County

North Florida CountiesNorth Florida CountiesSaras' ota*County

Orange County

14t WORK)

Baby and mother have just negotiated meaning ina natural acquisition setting. She did not have todrill the baby on the word "bottle" during thechild's infancy for the interaction to be meaning-ful. The mother simply expanded the child's lan-guage and modeled correct sentence structure.This modeling is sometimes called mother-ese,caretaker-ese, or teacher-ese.

The aforementioned illustration introducesanother fundamental concept underlying innatistsecond language learning philosophythe notionof natural stages in language acquisition. In otherwords, educators realize that ESL learners passthrough general developmental stages commonacross all _second language learners (Krashen,1977.) Therefore adults acquire second languagestructures in a similar order as do children learningtheir'first language structures: Consider a 2 year-old child named Scott who says, "Scott go-ed toschool today." His father replies; "Oh, you went toschool today." Even though the father models thestructure correctly and negotiates meaning in con-text, Scott will probably NOT learn the irregularform of the verb to-go for two more years.However, he may substitute the pronoun I forScott in the next few months. Scott is passingthrough natural stages of first language acquisi-tion. A second language learner.will pass through

A t WORK is produced by FloridaHuman Resources Development, Inc.The Executive Director, Ron Froman, found-ed this non-profit organization to promote_the development of human resources amongyouth and adults relative to economic devel-opment in Florida, and to collaborativelydeliver programs and activities appropriate tothe enhancement of the state's workforcedevelopment system.

alt WORK Production TeamWriter/Editor: Teri McLeanDesigner: KD Kinsley-Momberger

For more information regardingFlorida Human Resources Development, Inc.contact Ron Froman at (407) 699-9622

the same stages in more or less the same order.Research has also determined that the