Relaxa English Advanced 2

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Relaxa English Advanced 2

Transcript of Relaxa English Advanced 2

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    SITA GmbHPinneberg, Germany .01.2006Printed in Bulgaria

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  • 4

    1 6

    A Changing Industry

    ( )

    20

    21

    2 24

    The Effects of Unemployment

    ( - )

    40

    42

    3 44

    Sports and Recreation

    ( )

    54

    4 56

    Geography

    ()

    66

    one

    68

    5 70

    The Library

    ()

    82

    To want

    83

    6 86

    Transportation

    ()

    98

  • 5

    7 100

    The Consumers Woes

    ( )

    114

    8 116

    The Teatre

    ()

    128

    So ()

    Neither/Nor (/)

    130

    9 132

    Government

    ()

    142

    143

    10 146

    Holidays

    ()

    158

    162

    165

  • 6 1

    Unit 1

    A Changing Industry

    1

    industry

    to have a rest

    heavy

    hiking bag

    park

    bench

    park bench

    to compensate for

    trouble

    to pack

  • 7A Changing Industry

    A: Do you mind if I have a seat?

    B: No, certainly not. Sit down.

    A: It feels good to have a rest.

    B: I can imagine with that heavyhiking bag.

    A: Yes, but sitting on this parkbench and enjoying the lovelyweather compensates for allthe trouble.

    B: This time of the year is a goodtime for travelling.

    A: Thats what I thought, soI packed my things and boughta train ticket and here I am.

    : , ?

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    : .

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    : , - .

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  • 8 1

    What made you come? ?

    expectation

    Did it meet your expectations? ?

    side ,

    difference

    between

    urban

  • 9B: But what made you come toScotland?

    A: Well, Ive read and seen quite abit about this part of the coun-try in newspapers and maga-zines. So I thought I wouldcome and have a look.

    B: I see. There is no better way toget to know the country thantravelling. Did Scotland meetyour expectations?

    A: Frankly, I really do not know.

    B: What do you mean?

    A: There seems to be two sides tothe region.

    B: You mean the difference be-tween the countryside and theurban areas?

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    : . - - . - ?

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    : - ?

    A Changing Industry

  • 10 1

    economic

    everyone

    to die out

    to move in

    to characterize

    situation ,

    to rely on sth.

    traditional

    steel production

    textiles

    shipyard

    decade

  • 11A Changing Industry

    A: No, not really. Im more inter-ested in the economic situa-tion. On the one hand everyoneis talking about old industriesdying out and on the otherhand new industries are mov-ing in.

    B: Yes, that characterizes the situ-ation quite well. Scotland usedto rely on the traditional indus-tries such as fishing, steel pro-duction, textiles, and ship-yards. But that has changedvery much during the last dec-ade. Those industries cantprovide the jobs needed.

    A: , . - -. - , - , .

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  • 12 1

    despondent ,

    dim ,

    simply

    unemployment

    unemployment rate

    frustrating

  • 13

    A: Yes, I met some young peoplein Glasgow. They were quitedespondent and saw the futurerather dim. There are simply nojobs for them.

    B: Yes, Glasgow has one of thehighest unemployment rates inthe area, and I can understandtheir complaints quite well. It isa very frustrating situation.

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    A Changing Industry

  • 14 1

    oil

    North Sea oil

    economy

    somewhat

    the seventies 70- ()

    revenues

    British Treasury

    supply

    to supply

    ease ,

    to ease

    recession ,

  • 15

    A: But here in Aberdeen the situa-tion looks a bit better. Whatseems to be the difference?

    B: Well, the unemployment here isalso very high, but with theNorth Sea oil the localeconomy is somewhat better.

    A: Oh, I see.

    B: The oil came in about themiddle of the seventies andalthough most of the revenuesgo to the British Treasury, therewas a large demand forworkers in oil production andsupply companies. That hashelped ease the worst effectsof the recession here.

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    A Changing Industry

  • 16 1

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    to remain

    planner

    to plan

    growth

    to grow

    A: But as you already mentionedunemployment remains high. Isthere nothing that can be doneabout it?

    B: Im afraid there is no easy an-swer. Politicians and plannersin this area are looking towardnew industries to supply eco-nomic growth.

  • 17A Changing Industry

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    research -

    development

    laser

    electronics

    institute

    to take a long time

    hope

    to hope

    to emigrate

    A: Yes, the articles I read were fullof activities in new technolo-gies: research and develop-ment in the fields of lasers,electronics and computers atthe university of Edinburgh andother institutes. But that willtake a long time.

    B: Certainly, but there is a hope forthe future. Scotland has alwaysbeen a country whose peoplehave emigrated to other coun-tries such as the United States,Australia and New Zealand.

    2 2

  • 18 1

    to enter

    European Market

    qualified

    personnel ,

    there is no need to

    as

  • 19A Changing Industry

    B: But now for the first time wealso have a lot of foreign com-panies coming to Scotland toenter the European Market. Andthey are finding qualified per-sonnel here. So for many thereis no need to move away as be-fore.

    A: Well, it was nice to talk to youbut I think I must be off now.Bye-bye.

    B: Byebye, and have a good timein Scotland!

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  • 20 1

    The Ordinal Numbers ( )

    1st the first - 2nd the second - 3rd the third - 4th the fourth - 5th the fifth - 6th the sixth - 7th the seventh - 8th the eighth - 9th the ninth -

    10th the tenth - ..11th the eleventh12th the twelfth13th the thirteenth14th the fourteenth15th the fifteenth16th the sixteenth17th the seventeenth18th the eighteenth19th the nineteenth20th the twentieth21st the twenty-first

    22nd the twenty-second23rd the twenty-third24th the twenty-fourth25th the twenty-fifth30th the thirtieth40th the fortieth50th the fiftieth60th the sixtieth

  • 21

    70th the seventieth80th the eightieth90th the ninetieth

    100th the hundredth1 000th the thousandth

    I. Fill in the missing words. ( .)

    1. Alfred packed his things, bought a ................. and went to Scot-

    land.

    2. He had rest on a ............................

    3. He has read and seen quite a bit of Scotland in ........................

    and ....................

    4. Alfred is interested in the ............................

    5. Scotland used to rely on the ............................ such as fishing,

    steel production and shipyards.

    6. Glasgow has one of the highest ............................ in the area.

  • 22 1

    7. Young people in Glasgow are quite ..................... and they see

    their future rather .........................

    8. In Aberdeen the situation ......................... a bit better.

    9. The local economy is somewhat better, because of the

    ....................

    10. Politicians and planners are looking toward new industries

    ............... economic growth.

    II. Fill in the missing Ordinal Numbers. ( - .)

    1. Monday is the ............................. day of the week.

    2. Wednesday is the ......................... day of the week.

    3. August is the .............................. month of the year.

    4. February is the ............................ month of the year.

    5. December is the ........................... month of the year.

  • 23

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  • 24 2

    Unit 2

    The Effects of Unemploy-ment

    2

    the effect of sth.

    sceptical

    to warrant

    continued

    complacent

    fate

    million

    social worker

    to care for smb.

    unemployed

  • 25

    R: Good evening, ladies andgentlemen. Im sure most ofyou are sceptical about ourtopic tonight. One hears aboutunemployment in the news al-most daily, yet nothing muchseems to improve. But Im surethat the subject of unemploy-ment warrants more attentionand continued effort, unless webecome complacent about thisfate of millions of people. Thisevening we are going to talk toMr. Jones. Mr. Jones is a socialworker in a centre caring forthe unemployed in GreaterLondon.

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    The Effects of Unemployment

  • 26 2

    viewer

    to exclude

    official

    meaning

    to interpret ,

    view

    directly

    to be confronted with sth.