RELATIONSHIP OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION TO MENTAL HEALTH /67531/metadc164249/m2/1/high_re¢ ...

download RELATIONSHIP OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION TO MENTAL HEALTH /67531/metadc164249/m2/1/high_re¢  Self-actualization

of 129

  • date post

    04-Oct-2020
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    1
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of RELATIONSHIP OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION TO MENTAL HEALTH /67531/metadc164249/m2/1/high_re¢ ...

  • RELATIONSHIP OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION

    TO MENTAL HEALTH

    APPROVED:

    Graduate Committee:

    & (P. » j | n « n t t h m m m m m m m r n m m m m m m m m m m m m

    Major Professor

    T7r j2*~ ' J Committee Member

    Committee Member 7

    Dean of the School of Education , o

    Dean of '/J \ 3 ̂ ̂ X~A— the Graduate School

  • RELATIONSHIP OF SELF-ACTUALIZATION

    TO'MENTAL HEALTH

    DISSERTATION

    Presented to the Graduate Council of the

    North Texas State University in Partial

    Fulfillment of the Requirements

    For the Degree of

    DOCTOR OF EDUCATION

    By

    Edith Nyrle Vance, B. S., M. Ed,

    Denton, Texas

    January, 1967

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Page

    LIST OF TABLES v

    Chapter

    I. INTRODUCTION 1 Statement of the Problem Hypotheses Background and Significance of the Study Definitions of Terms Basic Assumptions Limitations of the Study Chapter Bibliography

    II. RELATED RESEARCH 17

    Research with the Various Forms of the Mental Health Analysis

    Studies of Self-Actualizing People Chapter Bibliography

    III. PROCEDURES FOR COLLECTING DATA AND THE INSTRUMENTS EMPLOYED 31

    Procedures for Collecting Data Instruments Employed Research with the Principal Instruments Chapter Bibliography

    IV. PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF DATA 40

    Statistical Treatment of the Data Relationships of the Scales of- the POI

    to the Categories of the MHA Comparisons of the Upper and Lower

    Groups on the Scales of the POI and of the I-IHA

    Analysis of the Data Jlmong College Freshmen

    Chapter Bibliography

    1X1

  • V. SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS, IMPLICATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 91

    Summary- Conclusions Implications Recommendations

    APPENDIX I 99

    APPENDIX II 100

    APPENDIX III 102

    APPENDIX IV . . 104

    APPENDIX V 106

    APPENDIX VI . . . . . . . . 10^

    APPENDIX VII 110

    APPENDIX VIII 112

    APPENDIX IX 113

    APPENDIX X 114

    APPENDIX XI . .- 115

    APPENDIX XII 116

    APPENDIX XIII 117

    APPENDIX XIV . 116

    BIBLIOGRAPHY ' 119

    XV

  • LIST OF TABLES

    Table

    I. Number and Percent of Population in Sample

    II,

    III

    IV.

    V.

    VI.

    VII.

    VIII.

    II.

    Correlation and Level of Significance Between the Mental Health Analysis and the Personal Orientation Inventory . .

    Page

    44

    . 45

    Mean Differences and Significance of the Differences on the Mental Health* Analysis Between the Lower and Upper Groups As Determined, by the Scores on the Categories of the Personal Orientation Inventory . .

    Mean Differences and Significance of the Differences on the Personal Orientation Inventory Between the Lower and Upper Groups as Determined by the Scores on the Scales of the Mental Health Analysis .

    Means, Standard. Deviations, and Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Under-nineteen and Nineteen-year-old Age Groups on the Personal Orientation Inventory . . . . .

    . 51

    . 55

    59

    Means, Standard Deviations, and Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Under-nineteen and. Nineteen-year-old Age Groups on the Mental Health Analysis ,

    Means, Standard Deviations, and Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Males and. Females on the Personal Orientation Inventory . . ,

    . 61

    Means, Standard. Deviations, and Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Males and the Females on the Mental Health Analysis ,

    Means, Standard Deviations, and Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Single Males and Single Females on the Personal Orientation Inventory

    63

    64

    66

    v

  • X. Means, Standard Deviations, and Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Single Males and Single Females on the Mental Health Analysis ,

    XI.

    XIV.

    XV.

    XVI.

    XVII,

    XVIII.

    XIX.

    63

    Means3 Standard Deviations, and Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Lower and Middle Academic Aptitude Groups on the Personal Orientation Inventory ,

    XII. Means, Standard Deviations, "and Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Lower and Upper Academic Aptitude Groups on the Personal Orientation Inventory

    XIII. Means, Standard Deviations, and Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Middle and Upper Academic Aptitude Groups on the Personal Orientation Inventory '

    Means, Standard Deviations, and Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Lower and Middle Academic Aptitude Groups on the Mental Health Analysis . . ,

    Means, Standard Deviations, and Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Lower and Upper Academic Aptitude Groups on the Mental Health Analysis . . ,

    Means, Standard Deviations, and Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Middle and Upper Academic Aptitude Groups on the Mental Health Analysis . . ,

    Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Majors in Various Academic Areas on the Personal Orientation Inventory . ,

    Significance of the Differences Between the Means of the Majors in Various Academic. Areas on the Mental Health Analysis . .

    Composition of the Lower and Upper Groups Determined by Scores on the Personal Orientation Inventory . . . . . . . . .

    71

    72

    74

    76

    73

    BO

    S3

    37

    100

    VI

  • XX. Means and Standard Deviations on the Mental Health Analysis for the Lower Groups As Determined by Scores on the Personal Orientation Inventory 102

    XXI. Means and Standard Deviations on the Mental Health Analysis for the Upper Groups As Determined by Scores on the Personal Orientation Inventory 104

    XXII. Composition of the Lower and Upper Groups As Determined by Scores on the Mental Health Analysis 106

    XXIII. Means and Standard Deviations on the Personal Orientation Inventory for "Che Lower Groups As Determined by the Scores on the Mental Health Analysis . . . . . . . . . 108

    XXIV. Means and Standard Deviations on the Personal Orientation Inventory for the Upper Groups As Determined by the Scores on the Mental Health Analysis 110

    XX¥. Frequency Distribution of Birthdates of Freshmen at North Texas State

    University 112

    XXVI. Males and Females in Population and Sample . . 113

    XXVII. Marital Status of Population and Sample . . . 114

    XXVIII. Composition of Lower, Middle, and Upper Groups on Academic Aptitude . . . . . . . . 115

    XXIX. Number of Academic Majors in Population and Sample 116

    XXX. Means and Standard Deviations for Majors in Various Academic Areas on the Personal Orientation Inventory 117

    XXXI. Means and Standard Deviations on the Mental Health Analysis for Majors in Various Academic Areas 113

    VI i

  • CHAPTER I

    INTRODUCTION

    Self-actualization is a new concept sometimes used to

    measure the degree of psychological sickness and health; it

    was advanced by the personality theorist, Abraham Maslow.

    In his enthusiasm for his new theory, he has advanced certain

    basic assumptions about the meaning of self-actualization

    that have not been confirmed as reliable scientific knowl-

    edge (13, p. 3).

    Maslow's (13, pp. 3-4) basic assumptions for the concept;

    of self-actualization are as follows:

    1. Each person has an essential biologically-based

    inner nature which is unchanging, natural, and intrinsic.

    2. This inner nature is unique to the individual in

    part, and partly, species-wide. It can be unique, as a

    person's having a talent for music, or characteristic of all

    human beings,as the need for love.

    3. This inner life can be studied scientifically to

    discover what it is like.

    4. This inner nature is either good or neutral. When

    it appears to be evil it is often a secondary reaction to

    frustration of this inner life.

    5. If this basic inner life is permitted to guide a

    person, he will grow healthy, happy, and productive.

  • 6. Sickness is the result cf the denial of this inner

    man. This sickness may happen in obvious or subtle ways;

    it can be immediate or delayed.

    7. This inner nature is weak and delicate and is easily

    overcome by cultural pressure, habit, and wrong attitudes

    toward it.

    8. This weak inner nature may be overcome, but it rarely

    disappears. Even in the sickest persons itapersists below

    the surface, striving for self-actualization.

    9. The individual needs discipline, deprivation, and

    frustration in moderation to help reveal, foster, and fulfill

    his inner nature. • .

    If these assumptions are verified, Maslow believes it '

    would offer psychologists a new approach in helping the indivi-

    dual to learn, "how to be good, how to be happy, how to be

    fruitful, how to respect himself, how to love, how to fulfill

    his highest potentialities" (13,