RE-IMAGINING ORLANDO’S TALENT SUPPLY ... hiring will help fill jobs quickly, retain talent,...

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Transcript of RE-IMAGINING ORLANDO’S TALENT SUPPLY ... hiring will help fill jobs quickly, retain talent,...

  • Skills-Based Hiring for Upward Mobility

    RE-IMAGINING ORLANDO’S TALENT SUPPLY

  • Trends in automation, remote work and inclusivity ac- celerated by the COVID-19 pandemic are creating a new standard for work. Instead of waiting for jobs to re- appear in a business-as-usual environment, strategic organizations need to pivot to new methodologies for talent acquisition and development. This four-part re- port introduces data-backed, easy-to-implement strat- egies that local employers, individuals, and workforce developers can use to address the rapidly changing dynamics within the region’s labor market.

    The analysis provides insight on increasing workplace diversity, accelerated workforce automation, and the challenges of transitioning beyond low-wage jobs by specifically focusing on three vulnerable occupations. These three jobs are highlighted for their lower than average wages, high automation risk, significant con- centration in the Orlando job market and lastly, their exposure to COVID-19 related layoffs. The three most vulnerable occupations are :

    Waiters and Waitresses

    Cashiers

    Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners

    These three occupations, alone, make up 6.8 percent of all jobs in Orlando. They are low-wage and more likely to be held by women, ethnic or racial minorities, and people with lower levels of formal education. These characteristics signal a host of challenges workers might encounter even in a healthy job market. However, this does not mean these workers lack the skills neces- sary to succeed in a post-COVID economy. It is quite the opposite.

    Research on in-demand skills and the identification of new workforce trends highlights the hidden skills and abilities these workers have that may normally be

    overlooked through common hiring methods, such as requiring a four-year degree in a job post. These three occupations require strong, specialized skills in commu- nication, customer service, cleaning, caregiving, etc., that make them potential candidates for other in-de- mand jobs that currently exist in the Orlando market.

    The report matches abilities from this specific talent pool to skills of the future as a method for promoting skills-based hiring tactics and showcase areas for po- tential upskilling. Workforce developers, employers, and educators can use this report as an introduction to skills-based hiring and leverage future skills-based analytics for talent development.

    Skills-based hiring represents a data-driven strategy that generates value for both employers and applicants. It requires a different mindset—one that encourages employers to evaluate an individual’s skills and abilities, instead of background, and rethink job description re- quirements.

    Skills-based hiring practices encourage business leaders to identify candidates with the skillsets nec- essary to drive immediate value and progress along career pathways that, in turn, help drive long-term busi- ness and personal growth. As a deliberate departure from entrenched approaches to talent acquisition and development, this report represents an important step in reconnecting workers to career paths that foster broad-based prosperityTM.

    Executive Summary

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    If implemented, skills-based hiring will help fill jobs quickly, retain talent, diversify an organization’s talent pipeline, and help provide a greater awareness of skill attainment and critical upskilling needs.

    Orlando Economic Partnership | The Foundation for Orlando’s Future | Orlando.org/Reports i

  • Contents Executive Summary

    Contents

    Introduction

    Part I: Implementing Skills-Based Hiring

    What Is Skills-Based Hiring?

    Advantages of Skills-Based Hiring

    Elements of Skills-Based Hiring

    How to Implement Skills-Based Hiring

    Part II: COVID-19 and the Shifting Skills Landscape

    More than Just Tech Skills and Soft Skills

    Case Study – Software and Programming Skills Change from 2010-2019

    Skills of the Future, Skills of the Past

    Part III: Jobs Most Impacted by COVID-19 Layoffs

    Occupations Rather Than Industry

    Identifying Vulnerable Workers

    Part IV: Occupational Deep Dives

    Demographic and Wage Overview

    Waiters and Waitresses

    Cashiers

    Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners

    Skill Profiles

    Waiters and Waitresses

    Cashiers

    Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners

    Opportunities for Upward Mobility

    Waiters and Waitresses

    Cashiers

    Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners

    Conclusion

    Appendix

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    Orlando Economic Partnership | The Foundation for Orlando’s Future | Orlando.org/Reports

    Skills-Based Hiring for Upward Mobility

    RE-IMAGINING ORLANDO’S TALENT SUPPLY

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  • Introduction In the wake of the global COVID-19 pandemic, busi-

    nesses are seeking strategies to reduce risk, recover financially and address diversity and inclusion at all lev- els. As unemployment rates hit highs not seen since the Great Depression, underlying racial divides, trends in automation, and barriers to prosperity have been exac- erbated. Orlando is no exception. This report introduces new data that local employers, individuals, and work- force developers can use to address increasing work- place diversity, the challenges of transitioning beyond a low-wage occupation, and accelerated workforce auto- mation. If navigated successfully, improving outcomes from these trends will help the Orlando region reach a goal of broad-based prosperityTM, where every resident has the access and capabilities they need in order to take advantage of increasing opportunity.

    During the second quarter of 2020, Orlando’s unem- ployment rate was as high as 22.6 percent, twice as high as the peak unemployment rate during the 2008 recession. When and how jobs will return to the local economy is on everyone’s minds. The Bureau of La- bor Statistics (BLS) reports that 78 percent of job loss- es in April 2020 were classified as temporary,1 a sign that jobs could be waiting for laid-off employees on the other side of the pandemic. However, the depth of the

    recession, speed of economic recovery, and integration of technology into the workplace will impact just how quickly jobs are regained.

    It is important to recognize that the trends of automa- tion, remote work, and inclusivity accelerated by the current environment are creating a new standard for work. Instead of waiting for jobs to reappear in a busi- ness-as-usual environment, strategic organizations need to pivot to new methodologies for talent acquisi- tion and development. This entails research on in-de- mand skills and leveraging new tools to help implement skills-based pathways within the workforce. Using this information, workforce developers, employers, educa- tors, and individuals are better armed with information about how to invest in skills of the future rather than pursue skills of the past.

    Part I of this report includes concrete recommendations for tools and tactics aimed at implementing skills-based hiring practices and creating upward mobility pathways. Part II provides analysis on the shifting skills demand created by COVID-19 and other major trends including demographic shifts and technological disruption. Part III highlights the specific disruptions Orlando’s workforce has faced throughout the pandemic. And finally, Part IV ends with an overview of three occupations in Orlando where the vulnerable workforce would benefit from the increased use of skills-based hiring practices.

    “COVID-19 has accelerated the threat of automation to Orlando’s workforce. Understanding the need to reskill, upskill, and take advantage of existing skillsets is essential for both employees and employers to maintain competitiveness as technological advances continue to disrupt markets and workforces. The ability to better understand what emerging skill sets are needed to succeed is essential to recovery and growth in a post-COVID economy.”

    Tim Giuliani President and CEO, Orlando Economic Partnership

    1Bureau of Labor Statistics. Household Data [Unemployed persons by reason for unemployment].

    Orlando Economic Partnership | The Foundation for Orlando’s Future | Orlando.org/Reports 1

    https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t11.htm

  • PART I Implementing

    Skills-Based Hiring

    Skills-Based Hiring for Upward Mobility

    RE-IMAGINING ORLANDO’S TALENT SUPPLY

  • What Is Skills-Based Hiring? Skills-based hiring is a strategy that generates value for

    both employers and applicants by creating skill-focused job descriptions and evaluating candidates based on distinct and discrete skills. It requires a mindset shift— one that encourages an employer to evaluate an indi- vidual’s skills and abilities instead of background, and rethink job requirements. If implemented, skills-based hiring will help fill jobs quickly, retain talent, diversify an organization’s talent pipeline, and help provide a great- er awareness of skill attainment and critical upskilling needs.

    Put simply, skills-based hiring is the process of cre- ating skill-focused job descrip