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  • IAS 37

    © IASCF 1877

    International Accounting Standard 37

    Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

    This version includes amendments resulting from IFRSs issued up to 31 December 2008.

    IAS 37 Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets was issued by the International Accounting Standards Committee in September 1998. It replaced parts of IAS 10 Contingencies and Events Occurring After the Balance Sheet Date (issued in 1978 and reformatted in 1994) that dealt with contingencies.

    In April 2001 the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) resolved that all Standards and Interpretations issued under previous Constitutions continued to be applicable unless and until they were amended or withdrawn.

    Since then, IAS 37 and its accompanying guidance have been amended by the following IFRSs:

    • IAS 8 Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors (issued December 2003)

    • IAS 10 Events after the Reporting Period (issued December 2003)

    • IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment (as revised in December 2003)

    • IAS 39 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement (as revised in December 2003)

    • IFRS 3 Business Combinations (issued March 2004)

    • IFRS 4 Insurance Contracts (issued March 2004)

    • IFRS 5 Non-current Assets Held for Sale and Discontinued Operations (issued March 2004)

    • Financial Guarantee Contracts (Amendments to IAS 39 and IFRS 4) (issued August 2005)

    • IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements (as revised in September 2007)*

    • IFRS 3 Business Combinations (as revised in January 2008).†

    The following Interpretations refer to IAS 37:

    • SIC-27 Evaluating the Substance of Transactions Involving the Legal Form of a Lease (issued December 2001)

    • SIC-29 Service Concession Arrangements: Disclosures (issued December 2001 and subsequently amended)

    • IFRIC 1 Changes in Existing Decommissioning, Restoration and Similar Liabilities (issued May 2004)

    * effective date 1 January 2009

    † effective date 1 July 2009

  • IAS 37

    1878 © IASCF

    • IFRIC 5 Rights to Interests arising from Decommissioning, Restoration and Environmental Rehabilitation Funds (issued December 2004)

    • IFRIC 6 Liabilities arising from Participating in a Specific Market—Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (issued September 2005)

    • IFRIC 12 Service Concession Arrangements (issued November 2006 and subsequently amended)

    • IFRIC 13 Customer Loyalty Programmes (issued June 2007)

    • IFRIC 14 IAS 19—The Limit on a Defined Benefit Asset, Minimum Funding Requirements and their Interaction (issued July 2007 and subsequently amended)

    • IFRIC 15 Agreements for the Construction of Real Estate (issued July 2008).*

    * effective date 1 January 2009

  • IAS 37

    © IASCF 1879

    CONTENTS paragraphs

    INTRODUCTION IN1–IN23

    INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING STANDARD 37 PROVISIONS, CONTINGENT LIABILITIES AND CONTINGENT ASSETS

    OBJECTIVE

    SCOPE 1–9

    DEFINITIONS 10–13

    Provisions and other liabilities 11

    Relationship between provisions and contingent liabilities 12–13

    RECOGNITION 14–35

    Provisions 14–26

    Present obligation 15–16 Past event 17–22 Probable outflow of resources embodying economic benefits 23–24 Reliable estimate of the obligation 25–26

    Contingent liabilities 27–30

    Contingent assets 31–35

    MEASUREMENT 36–52

    Best estimate 36–41

    Risks and uncertainties 42–44

    Present value 45–47

    Future events 48–50

    Expected disposal of assets 51–52

    REIMBURSEMENTS 53–58

    CHANGES IN PROVISIONS 59–60

    USE OF PROVISIONS 61–62

    APPLICATION OF THE RECOGNITION AND MEASUREMENT RULES 63–83

    Future operating losses 63–65

    Onerous contracts 66–69

    Restructuring 70–83

    DISCLOSURE 84–92

    TRANSITIONAL PROVISIONS 93

    EFFECTIVE DATE 95

    APPENDICES

    A Tables – Provisions, contingent liabilities, contingent assets and reimbursements

    B Decision tree

    C Examples: recognition

    D Examples: disclosures

  • IAS 37

    1880 © IASCF

    International Accounting Standard 37 Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets (IAS 37) is set out in paragraphs 1–95. All the paragraphs have equal authority but retain the IASC format of the Standard when it was adopted by the IASB. IAS 37 should be read in the context of its objective, the Preface to International Financial Reporting Standards and the Framework for the Preparation and Presentation of Financial Statements. IAS 8 Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors provides a basis for selecting and applying accounting policies in the absence of explicit guidance.

  • IAS 37

    © IASCF 1881

    Introduction

    IN1 IAS 37 prescribes the accounting and disclosure for all provisions, contingent liabilities and contingent assets, except:

    (a) those resulting from financial instruments that are carried at fair value;

    (b) those resulting from executory contracts, except where the contract is onerous. Executory contracts are contracts under which neither party has performed any of its obligations or both parties have partially performed their obligations to an equal extent;

    (c) those arising in insurance entities from contracts with policyholders; or

    (d) those covered by another Standard.

    Provisions

    IN2 The Standard defines provisions as liabilities of uncertain timing or amount. A provision should be recognised when, and only when :

    (a) an entity has a present obligation (legal or constructive) as a result of a past event;

    (b) it is probable (ie more likely than not) that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation; and

    (c) a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. The Standard notes that it is only in extremely rare cases that a reliable estimate will not be possible.

    IN3 The Standard defines a constructive obligation as an obligation that derives from an entity’s actions where :

    (a) by an established pattern of past practice, published policies or a sufficiently specific current statement, the entity has indicated to other parties that it will accept certain responsibilities; and

    (b) as a result, the entity has created a valid expectation on the part of those other parties that it will discharge those responsibilities.

    IN4 In rare cases, for example in a law suit, it may not be clear whether an entity has a present obligation. In these cases, a past event is deemed to give rise to a present obligation if, taking account of all available evidence, it is more likely than not that a present obligation exists at the end of the reporting period. An entity recognises a provision for that present obligation if the other recognition criteria described above are met. If it is more likely than not that no present obligation exists, the entity discloses a contingent liability, unless the possibility of an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits is remote.

    IN5 The amount recognised as a provision should be the best estimate of the expenditure required to settle the present obligation at the end of the reporting period, in other words, the amount that an entity would rationally pay to settle the obligation at the end of the reporting period or to transfer it to a third party at that time.

  • IAS 37

    1882 © IASCF

    IN6 The Standard requires that an entity should, in measuring a provision:

    (a) take risks and uncertainties into account. However, uncertainty does not justify the creation of excessive provisions or a deliberate overstatement of liabilities;

    (b) discount the provisions, where the effect of the time value of money is material, using a pre-tax discount rate (or rates) that reflect(s) current market assessments of the time value of money and those risks specific to the liability that have not been reflected in the best estimate of the expenditure. Where discounting is used, the increase in the provision due to the passage of time is recognised as an interest expense;

    (c) take future events, such as changes in the law and technological changes, into account where there is sufficient objective evidence that they will occur; and

    (d) not take gains from the expected disposal of assets into account, even if the expected disposal is closely linked to the event giving rise to the provision.

    IN7 An entity may expect reimbursement of some or all of the expenditure required to settle a provision (for example, through insurance contracts, indemnity clauses or suppliers’ warranties). An entity should:

    (a) recognise a reimbursement when, and only when, it is virtually certain that reimbursement will be received if the entity settles the obligation. The amount recognised for the reimbursement should not exceed the amount of the provision; and

    (b) recognise the reimbursement as a separate asset. In the statement of comprehensive income, the expense relating to a provision may be presented net of the amount recognised for a reimbursement.

    IN8 Provisions should be reviewed at the end of each reporting period and adjusted to reflect the current best estimate. If it is no longer probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation,