Project Report On Emotion At Work Place -- Dhrubaji Mandal

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Simple Project Report on Single Topic "Emotion At Work Place " How to Manage it and work Effectively .

Transcript of Project Report On Emotion At Work Place -- Dhrubaji Mandal

  • Emotion (Emotion at Work Place) CONTROLLING YOUR FEELINGS... BEFORE THEY CONTROL YOU Submitted to Shri Anil Anand Pathak Associate Professor, Organizational Behavior Submitted By: Management Development Institute Dhrubaji Mandal 24/09/2013
  • ABSTRACT Although the experience of work is saturated with emotion, research has generally neglected the impact of everyday emotions on organizational life. Further, organizational scholars and practitioners frequently appear to assume that emotionality is the antithesis of rationality and, thus, frequently hold a pejorative view of emotion. This has led to four institutionalized mechanisms for regulating the experience and expression of emotion in the workplace: (1) neutralizing, (2) buffering, (3) prescribing, and (4) normalizing emotion. In contrast to this perspective, we argue that emotionality and rationality are interpenetrated, emotions are an integral and inseparable part of organizational life, and emotions are often functional for the organization. This argument is illustrated by applications to motivation, leadership, and group dynamics.
  • Table of Contents Introduction to Emotion ............................................................................ 3 The role of emotions .............................................................................. 4 Positive & Negative emotions ...................................................................... 4 Emotion in the Workplace .............................. 7 Types of Emotion..................................................................................... 8 Emotion, Attitude, AND Behavior .......................................................... 9 How emotions influence attitudes and behavior............................................ 10 Emotional Labor ............................................................................. 11 Organizations requiring high Emotional Labour ........... 12 Emotional Dissonance................................... . 13 Emotional Intelligence ................................. .. . 14 How to raise your emotional intelligence............................................... 14 Job Satisfaction and It Impact On Employee Emotion ....... . 16 Conclusion and References .................................................................. 17
  • Introduction to Emotion What Are Emotions? Emotions are intense feelings that are directed at someone or something In psychology and philosophy, emotion is a subjective, conscious experience that is characterized primarily by psychophysiological expressions, biological reactions, and mental states. Emotion is often associated and considered reciprocally influential with mood, temperament, personality, disposition, and motivation, [citation needed] as well as influenced by hormones and neurotransmitters such as dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin, oxytocin, cortisol and GABA. Emotion is often the driving force behind motivation, positive or negative. An alternative definition of emotion is a "positive or negative experience that is associated with a particular pattern of physiological activity. Emotions normally are associated with specific events or occurrences and are intense enough to disrupt thought processes. Moods on the other hand, are more generalized feelings or states that are not typically identified with a particular stimulus and not sufficiently intense to interrupt ongoing thought processes. There can be many consequences for allowing negative emotions to affect your general attitude or mood at work. Emotions and emotion management is a prominent feature of organizational life. It is crucial to create a publicly observable and desirable emotional display as a part of a job role.
  • The role of Emotions Emotions play such a big role in our lives that there are more than 600 words in English to describe them verbally, not to mention 43 facial muscles to express them physically. And although human beings speak more than 6,000 languages, about 90 percent of people across different cultures have no trouble figuring out if someone is registering happiness, surprise, or disgust just by looking at the persons face. We are supersensitive to the slightest shift in peoples facial expressions, especially if they are registering fear or anger. We are not slaves to emotional cues and triggers. We can use reason to evaluate our emotions, interpret them, and even reassess our initial reaction to them. We can soften their impact or shift their meaning.[6] In other words, we can control our own emotions as well as the effect that other peoples emotions have on us. In fact, the ability to detect, assess, and control ones emotions is one of the predictors of success in relating to the other. So, somewhat paradoxically, connecting with the other depends on developing a deep understanding of ourselves what triggers our strongest emotions, and how the emotions we show impact others. For example, an executive who understands that looming deadlines bring out the worse in her wont schedule an important meeting if she has work piling up. A manager who knows that talking about certain subjects tends to get him angry will think twice before reacting to an opinion that would normally set him off Positive & Negative Emotions Positive emotions at work such as high achievement and excitement have desirable effect independent of a person's relationships with others, including greater task activity, persistence and enhanced cognitive function. Strong positive emotions of emotionally intelligent people [include] optimism, positive mood, self-efficacy, and emotional resilience to persevere under adverse circumstances. Optimism rests on the premise that failure is not inherent in the individual; it may be attributed to circumstances that may be changed with a refocusing of effort Negative emotions at work can be formed by work overload, lack of rewards, and social relations which appear to be the most stressful work-related factors.[16] Cynicism is a negative affective reaction to the organization. Cynics feel contempt, distress, shame, and even disgust when they reflect upon their organizations (Abraham, 1999). Negative emotions are caused by a range of workplace issues, including aggression, verbal abuse, sexual harassment, computer flaming, blogging, assertiveness training, grapevines, and non-verbal behavior
  • Graphical view For Positive & Negative emotions Positive Moods are Highest At the End of the Week In the Middle Part of the Day Negative Moods are Highest At the Beginning of the Week And show little variation throughout the day
  • EMOTIONS IN THE WORKPLACE Emotions have a profound effect on almost everything we do in the workplace. This is a strong statement, and one that you would rarely find a decade ago in organizational behavior research or textbooks. For most of its history, the field of OB assumed that a persons thoughts and actions are governed primarily by con- scions reasoning (called cognitions). Yet, groundbreaking neuroscience discoveries have revealed that our perceptions, decisions, and behavior are influenced by both cognition and emotion, and that the latter often has the greater influence. By ignoring emotionality, many theories have overlooked a large piece of the puzzle about human behavior in the workplace. Today, OB scholars and their colleagues in marketing, economics, and many other social sciences, are catching up by making emotions a key part of their research and theories.2 so, what are emotions? Emotions are physiological, behavioral, and psychological episodes experienced toward an object, person, or event that create a state of readiness. There are four key elements of this definition. First, emotions are brief events or episodes. Your irritation with a customer, for instance, would typically subside within a few minutes. Second, emotions are directed toward someone or something. We experience joy, fear, anger, and other emotional episodes toward tasks, customers, public speeches we present, a soft- ware program we are using, and so on. These contrasts with moods, which are less intense emotional states that are not directed toward anything in particular. Third, emotions are experiences. They represent changes in a persons physiological conditions, such as blood pressure, heart rate, and perspiration, as well as changes in behavior, such as facial expression, voice tone, and eye movement. These emotional reactions are involuntary and often occur without our awareness. When aware of these responses, we also develop feelings (worry, fear, boredom) that further mark the emotional experience. The experience of emotion also relates to the fourth element, namely, that emotions put people in a state of readiness. When we get worried, for example, our heart rate and blood pressure increase to make our body better prepared to engage in fight or flight. Emotions are also communications to our conscious selves. Some emotions (e.g., anger, surprise, fear) are particularly strong triggers that interrupt our train of thought, demand our attention, and generate the motivation to take action. They make us aware of events that may affect our survival and well-being
  • TYPES OF EMOTIONS Emotions play such a big role in our lives that there are more than 600 words in English to describe them verbally, not to mention 43 facial muscles to express them physically. And although human beings speak more than 6,000 languages, about 90 percent of peopl