Preparing food safely for fairs and festivals

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Preparing Food Safely for Fairs and FestivalsOne LargeListeria witha Side ofSalmonella,Please!

Know how. Know now.

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Save Time Do More with our FREE educational resources:http://food.unl.edu/web/fnh/educational-resources

This publication has been peer-reviewed April 2014

Amy Peterson, MS RDUniversity of NebraskaLincoln Extensionamy.peterson@unl.edu

Menu1. Food Safety Facts2. My Plate Food Safety 3. Foodborne Illness Facts4. Food Safety - Keep or Toss?

Menu1. Food Safety Facts2. My Plate Food Safety 3. Foodborne Illness Facts4. Food Safety - Keep or Toss?

http://phil.cdc.gov/phil/quicksearch.asp

University of NebraskaLincolnCreated during the 1930s, this historic sign, explaining the benefits of safe food handling, was created by the Minnesota Department of Health. Its message was part of a campaign to promote food safety and to prevent food-borne illness.Many people do not think about food safety until a food-related illness affects them or a family member. While the food supply in the United States in 2005 was acknowledged as being one of the safest in the world, CDC estimates that 76 million people get sick, more than 300,000 are hospitalized, and 5,000 Americans die each year from food-borne illness. Preventing food-borne illness and death remains a major public health challenge.

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How many people in the United States get sick each year from food they eat?48 million people become sick from foodborne illnesses3,000 people die

SOURCE: http://mednews.com/food-illness-statistics-2010-cd

What Is A Foodborne Illness?A foodborne illness is a disease that is carried or transmitted to human beings by food. This can happen anywhere we serve food. 7

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Food safety impacts public health

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http://phil.cdc.gov/phil/quicksearch.aspEvery Food Service Is Unique

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http://www.cdc.gov/features/dsfoodborneoutbreaks/

Community Events

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County Fair Stands

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Festivals

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Bake Sales

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2020Food stands, soup suppers, bake sales and other food sales are often used by groups and organizations to raise money.

University of NebraskaLincoln20Food stands, bake sales, bazaars and other food sales provide good opportunities for organizations to raise money, but the food you prepare and offer for sale must be wholesome and safe for the consumer. If customers are unhappy with the products they purchase from you, they will not be back. Word-of-mouth advertisement from a bad experience may hurt future business. Sponsoring organizations are responsible for the safety of the food products they offer for sale. 20

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But ... you need to make sure youre selling or serving safe food!

University of NebraskaLincoln21Food stands, bake sales, bazaars and other food sales provide good opportunities for organizations to raise money, but the food you prepare and offer for sale must be wholesome and safe for the consumer. If customers are unhappy with the products they purchase from you, they will not be back. Word-of-mouth advertisement from a bad experience may hurt future business. Sponsoring organizations are responsible for the safety of the food products they offer for sale. 21

22Can YOUR organization afford to be liable for a food borne illness outbreak?22

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Sponsoring organizations are responsible for the safety of the food products they offer for sale or service.

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But above all, dont sell a foodborne illness!

University of NebraskaLincoln25The Nebraska Food Service Code has rules for Temporary Food Service Establishments.

Food stands, bake sales, bazaars and community suppers could be inspected by the Department of Agriculture or Department of Health under this ruling.

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A Temporary Food Service Establishment is defined as a food service establishment that operates at a fixed location for a period of time of not more than 14 consecutive days in conjunction with a single event or celebration.

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Commercial food stands at county fairs and other events are routinely inspected.27

University of NebraskaLincoln27My county fair picture again. 27

If complaints are made or if a reported illness results from food sold at an event, inspection and/or investigation may result.

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How do you know if YOU have a foodborne illness?29

Signs and symptoms of foodborne illness ...

Upset stomach

Fever

Vomiting

Diarrhea

Dehydration

Possible more severe conditions ...

Meningitis

Paralysis

Death

Sometimes you can become very sick and may have to stay in the hospital a couple of weeks or longer!

You cant always spot spoiled food by using these 3 senses what are they? SightSmell Taste

Even IF tasting would tell Why risk getting sick?

A tiny taste may not protect you Yuk! as few as 10 bacteria could make you sick!

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Foodborne illness is NOT a pretty picture!

43Help I think I am going to get sick!

How long does it take to get sick after eating unsafe food? It can take hour to 6 weeks to become sick from unsafe foods.You usually feel OK right after eating and become sick later.

Not everyone who eats the same food gets sick! 45Im feeling sick was it something I ate? How come no one else feels sick?

People with a higher risk for foodborne illness include ...

Infants

Pregnant women

Young children and older adults

People already weakened by another disease or treatment for a disease

People with a higher risk of foodborne illness should be especially careful to avoid these potentially hazardous foods

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Raw and undercooked meat and poultryRaw or partially cooked eggs and foods containing raw eggsUnpasteurized juices, milk, or milk productsRaw sprouts

Menu1. Food Safety Facts2. My Plate Food Safety 3. Foodborne Illness Facts4. Food Safety - Keep or Toss?

Be a Winner!Increase your chances of preventing foodborne illness!

Choose MyPlate Food Safety RecommendationsCleanSeparateCook ChillSource: http://www.choosemyplate.gov/healthy-eating-tips/food-safety-advice.html

Do this first before you cook!

The 10 most common causes of infection

After petting a dog or cat

After coughing or sneezingAfter using the bathroom in your homeAfter changing a diaperWash without soupAfter using a public restroomHand Washing HabitsHow Well Do Americans Wash Their Hands?

Always wash my hands Total Sample

200542%(16%)201039%200583%(10%)201083%201093% Women 77% Men201077%201271%

Before handlingor eating food

58http://www.bradleycorp.com/handwashing

http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/news/20100914/hand-washing-catching-on-in-the-us

Some Handwashing Facts9 out of 10 adults say they wash their hands after using public restrooms, but only 6 in 10 were observed doing so.Women wash their hands more often than men.Americans with college degrees say they wash their hands less than those without college degrees.

From survey conducted by the American Society for Microbiology, 1996

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Handwashing is the most effectiveway to stop the spread of illness5 handwashing steps follow ...

Wet hands with WARM water

Soap and scrub for 20 seconds

Rinse under clean, running water

Dry completely using a clean cloth or paper towel

Turn off water with paper towel

Wash hands after

Handling pets

Using the bathroom or changing diapers

Sneezing, blowing nose, and coughing

Touching a cut or open sore

Before AND after eating and handling food

Do you know the dirty parts of your kitchen?

DirtyDirtyDirty

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Avoid spreading bacteria!Use paper towels or clean dishcloths to wipe up kitchen surfaces or spills.

74Wash dishcloths often on the hot cycle of the washing machine and dry in a hot dryer.

Dirty dishcloths spread bacteriaBacteria like to grow in wet or damp dishcloths and sponges

Have lots of dishcloths or sponges so you can change them frequently!

There are more germs in the average kitchen than the bathroom. Sponges and dishcloths are the worst offenders.

~research by Dr. Charles Gerba

Photo Source: free digital photo by Victor Habbick

Cleaning TipsClean all food contact surfaces with warm water and soap. Use a clean cloth or paper towels. Do not use a sponge.After cleaning, sanitize with teaspoon chlorine bleach to one quart water.

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Clean does NOT mean sanitized!Just because something looks clean does not mean it is sanitized or safe to use. Sanitizing reduces the amount of germs on each item.

Allow time for dishes to air dry completely. This is the safest way to keep dishes clean because dishtowels can spread bacteria from dish to dish.

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