Powell Shopper-News 042213

of 16 /16
IN THIS ISSUE Life Action Revival Summit First Baptist Powell will host a Life Action Revival Sum- mit 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sun- days beginning April 28 and continue at 6:30 p.m. Monday- Thursday with special services on Saturdays. It will feature instructional teaching, family seminars, music, and programs for children and youth. See story on page A-7 Purple in Powell The Knoxville Purple Heart Chapter 356 met at Shoney’s Restaurant on April 16. Some attendees had suffered great physical losses in service to our country. But none dwelt on that. See Cindy Taylor’s story on A-3 No way to win Sometimes there is no way to win. Jimmy Cheek, chancellor of the University of Tennessee, might not win a popularity vote from football fans. Innocent though he may be, Jimmy is perceived as part of the problem. His goal of academic excellence, making UT one of the top research schools in the country, is thought to be a stumbling block, even a block- ade to football success. See Marvin West’s story on A-6 VOL. 52 NO. 16 April 22, 2013 www.ShopperNewsNow.com | www.facebook.com/ShopperNewsNow 7049 Maynardville Pike 37918 (865) 922-4136 NEWS [email protected] Sandra Clark | Cindy Taylor ADVERTISING SALES [email protected] Shannon Carey Jim Brannon | Tony Cranmore Brandi Davis | Patty Fecco Feel the crunch. $25 Tennova.com 859-7900 $25 859- 7900 enrollment this month. TITAN TITAN SELF-STORAGE SELF-STORAGE A A 938-2080 938-2080 Climate and non-climate controlled units, indoor and outdoor, RV storage, 24/7 access, month to month rentals, fenced, lighted and security, convenient to Halls and Powell. Lowest prices in town. Powell. NOW OPEN! Norris Freeway location ROOFING RE-ROOFS • REPAIRS • METAL WINDOWS • SIDING 24 Hr. Emergency Service Will work with your insurance company Insured, licensed & bonded • Locally owned & operated Member BBB since 2000 FREE ESTIMATES! 524-5888 exthomesolutions.com By Cindy Taylor The number 29 holds great sig- nificance for former UT football player Inquoris “Inky” Johnson. It was the jersey number he was wearing when a devastating injury threatened his life and ended his football career in 2006. He still wears that number ev- ery day. A chain bearing the Bible verse Jeremiah 29:11 hangs from his neck. He says he wears it to re- mind him of God’s goodness. Johnson spoke to students at Powell Middle School on April 15. He talked about pursuing your goals and never giving up. He says the road to success is always under construction and everybody has a dream. He told the students it is not about what happens to you or Powell Middle School students surround Inky Johnson after his presentation. Photo by Cindy Taylor ‘Never give up’ Budget talk What to expect from Burchett, Rogero By Betty Bean The theme won’t be “We’re in the Money” for fiscal year 2013- 14, but it won’t be “Buddy, Can You Spare a Dime,” either. And for that, local officials are grateful. “It’s a tight budget,” said Knox- ville Mayor Madeline Rogero, who is expected to unveil a proposal on Friday that looks a lot like last year’s $180 million budget. Analysis “Revenues are still pretty flat – it’s been this way for several years, but as the economy rebuilds, capi- tal projects will continue.” “Very sufficient,” was how Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett de- scribed the budget figure that is expected to nudge a little higher than last year’s $710 million, pri- marily due to an increase in edu- cation funding (BEP) from the state. The first thing that both may- ors want people to know is that in spite of expensive problems like insufficiently funded pensions, there won’t be a property tax in- crease in the coming year. “We’re delivering the services they need and not charging them any more for it – and these days that’s a pretty good deal,” Burchett said. County Finance Director Chris Caldwell said the county has seen modest growth – 2.5 percent in sales tax growth, 1.5 percent in property tax growth – and expects a $7 million increase in state edu- cational funding. “Nothing to write home about,” he Rogero Burchett said. “But growth, nevertheless. The mayor wants to pay down the debt by $100 million by the end of 2016, and we are still on pace to do that.” Meanwhile, the city has found a way to start get- ting a handle on its unfunded pen- sion liability. “This required taking $10 million out of our budget last year, and we applied it to this year to buffer the impact on the op- erating budget. That buys time and helps us meet those obligations while waiting for the economy to come back,” said Rogero. Vice Mayor Nick Pavlis, who represents South Knoxville and the University of Ten- nessee area, is cautiously happy. “There’s no pot of gold,” said Pavlis. “But I had some large capi- tal projects already in last year’s budget, and those are in the pipe- line.” He is speaking of Suttree Land- ing Park on the south waterfront, the realignment of Woodlawn and Ft. Dickerson at Chapman Highway, the redesign of Cum- berland Avenue and his favorite project, the Urban Wilderness. “That’s what I’ve pushed more than anything and I want to stay very focused on that,” Pavlis said. Rogero will host the annual budget luncheon at noon Friday, April 26, at Ijams Nature Center, Mead’s Quarry, spotlighting the first phase of the South Loop Trail, which connects Ijams Nature Cen- ter, Forks of the River Wildlife Management Area, William Has- tie Natural Area and Marie Myers Park and is part of the Urban Wil- derness project. Burchett will roll the count y budget out May 1, but says there won’t be any refreshments. “We’ll just be going around to the districts, giving presentations. It’s too dadgum expensive to feed a bunch of people.” More on A-3 around you but what happens in you. Students watched a clip from the UT/Air Force game during which Johnson suffered the injury. NEIGHBORHOOD BUZZ Jordan promoted at Clayton Homes David Jordan is now vice president for corporate ser- vices at Clayton Homes. Jordan and his wife, Pam, live in Halls. He began his career at Clayton Homes in 1983 and has held various positions with increasing re- sponsibilities, including serving as corporate controller since 2001. As vice president, he will continue to direct corporate accounting, risk management, community relations, philan- thropic outreach and facilities services. Jordan serves on the advisory council of blount- Achieves and as a member of the board of Innovative Education Partnership, representing Clay- ton Homes as lead corporate project manager for the Clayton- Bradley STEM Academy. He holds both bachelor’s and master’s degrees from UT. By Sandra Clark A drunk driving simulator will be at Powell High School next week, part of a program called Ar- rive Alive! with support from the Powell Business and Professional Association. The simulator will be at Powell High School Monday, April 29, from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. UNITE’s Arrive Alive program uses a high-tech simulator, impact video and a number of other re- sources to educate students about the dangers of drunk driving and texting while driving. The simula- tor allows students to experience, in a controlled environment, the potential consequences of drunk and distracted driving. One of the most commonly recognized driving distractions is cellphone use. About 89 percent of all Americans have a cellphone, according to CTIA – The Wireless Association. Drivers under age 20 have the highest proportion of distraction- related fatal crashes, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Their lack of driving experience can con- tribute to critical misjudgments if they become distracted. Also next week, Chick-fil-A and Bojangles will promote seat belt usage by distributing coupons in the parking lot. At a wrap-up assembly on Fri- day, students who sign a commit- ment card are eligible to win $50 gasoline cards and seniors can win a $500, $1,000 or $2,000 scholarship. Arrive Alive! Driver simulation at Powell High April 29

description

A great community newspaper serving Powell and the surrounding area

Transcript of Powell Shopper-News 042213

IN THIS ISSUE

Life Action Revival Summit

First Baptist Powell will host a Life Action Revival Sum-mit 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sun-days beginning April 28 and continue at 6:30 p.m. Monday-Thursday with special services on Saturdays. It will feature instructional teaching, family seminars, music, and programs for children and youth.

➤ See story on page A-7

Purple in Powell

The Knoxville Purple Heart Chapter 356 met at Shoney’s Restaurant on April 16. Some attendees had suffered great physical losses in service to our country.

But none dwelt on that.

➤ See Cindy Taylor’s story on A-3

No way to winSometimes there is no way

to win.Jimmy Cheek, chancellor

of the University of Tennessee, might not win a popularity vote from football fans.

Innocent though he may be, Jimmy is perceived as part of the problem. His goal of academic excellence, making UT one of the top research schools in the country, is thought to be a stumbling block, even a block-ade to football success.

➤ See Marvin West’s story on A-6

VOL. 52 NO. 16 April 22, 2013www.ShopperNewsNow.com | www.facebook.com/ShopperNewsNow

7049 Maynardville Pike 37918(865) 922-4136

NEWS

[email protected] Clark | Cindy Taylor

ADVERTISING [email protected]

Shannon Carey

Jim Brannon | Tony Cranmore

Brandi Davis | Patty Fecco

Feel the crunch.$25 Tennova.com

859-7900$25 859-7900enrollment this month.

TITANTITANSELF-STORAGESELF-STORAGE

AA 938-2080938-2080Climate and non-climate controlled units, indoor and outdoor,

RV storage, 24/7 access, month to month rentals, fenced, lighted and security, convenient to Halls

and Powell.

Lowest prices in town.

Powell.

NOW OPEN!Norris Freeway

location

ROOFINGRE-ROOFS • REPAIRS • METAL

WINDOWS • SIDING24 Hr. Emergency Service

Will work with your insurance companyInsured, licensed & bonded • Locally owned & operated

Member BBB since 2000FREE ESTIMATES!

524-5888exthomesolutions.com

By Cindy TaylorThe number 29 holds great sig-

nifi cance for former UT football player Inquoris “Inky” Johnson.

It was the jersey number he was wearing when a devastating injury threatened his life and ended his

football career in 2006. He still wears that number ev-

ery day. A chain bearing the Bible verse Jeremiah 29:11 hangs from his neck. He says he wears it to re-mind him of God’s goodness.

Johnson spoke to students at

Powell Middle School on April 15. He talked about pursuing your goals and never giving up. He says the road to success is always under construction and everybody has a dream. He told the students it is not about what happens to you or

Powell Middle School students surround Inky

Johnson after his presentation. Photo by Cindy Taylor

‘Never give up’

Budget talkWhat to expect from

Burchett, RogeroBy Betty Bean

The theme won’t be “We’re in the Money” for fi scal year 2013-14, but it won’t be “Buddy, Can You Spare a Dime,” either.

And for that, local offi cials are grateful.

“It’s a tight budget,” said Knox-ville Mayor Madeline Rogero, who is expected to unveil a proposal on Friday that looks a lot like last year’s $180 million budget.

Analysis“Revenues are still pretty fl at –

it’s been this way for several years, but as the economy rebuilds, capi-tal projects will continue.”

“Very suffi cient,” was how Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett de-

scribed the budget fi gure that is expected to nudge a little higher than last year’s $710 million, pri-marily due to an increase in edu-cation funding (BEP) from the state.

The fi rst thing that both may-ors want people to know is that in spite of expensive problems like insuffi ciently funded pensions, there won’t be a property tax in-crease in the coming year.

“We’re delivering the services they need and not charging them any more for it – and these days that’s a pretty good deal,” Burchett said.

County Finance Director Chris Caldwell said the county has seen modest growth – 2.5 percent in sales tax growth, 1.5 percent in property tax growth – and expects a $7 million increase in state edu-cational funding.

“Nothing to write home about,” he

Rogero

Burchett

said. “But growth, nevertheless. The mayor wants to pay down the debt by $100 million by the end of 2016, and we are still on pace to do that.”

Meanwhile, the city has found a way to start get-ting a handle on its unfunded pen-sion liability.

“This required taking $10 million out of our budget last year, and we applied it to this year to buffer the impact on the op-

erating budget. That buys time and helps us meet those obligations while waiting for the economy to come back,” said Rogero.

Vice Mayor Nick Pavlis, who represents South Knoxville and the University of Ten-

nessee area, is cautiously happy.“There’s no pot of gold,” said

Pavlis. “But I had some large capi-

tal projects already in last year’s budget, and those are in the pipe-line.”

He is speaking of Suttree Land-ing Park on the south waterfront, the realignment of Woodlawn and Ft. Dickerson at Chapman Highway, the redesign of Cum-berland Avenue and his favorite project, the Urban Wilderness.

“That’s what I’ve pushed more than anything and I want to stay very focused on that,” Pavlis said.

Rogero will host the annual budget luncheon at noon Friday, April 26, at Ijams Nature Center, Mead’s Quarry, spotlighting the fi rst phase of the South Loop Trail, which connects Ijams Nature Cen-ter, Forks of the River Wildlife Management Area, William Has-tie Natural Area and Marie Myers Park and is part of the Urban Wil-derness project.

Burchett will roll the county budget out May 1, but says there won’t be any refreshments.

“We’ll just be going around to the districts, giving presentations. It’s too dadgum expensive to feed a bunch of people.”

More on A-3

around you but what happens in you. Students watched a clip from the UT/Air Force game during which Johnson suffered the injury.

NEIGHBORHOOD BUZZ

Jordan promoted at Clayton Homes

David Jordan is now vice president for corporate ser-vices at Clayton Homes.

Jordan and his wife, Pam, live in Halls. He began his career at Clayton Homes in 1983 and has held various positions with increasing re-sponsibilities,

including serving as corporate controller since 2001.

As vice president, he will continue to direct corporate accounting, risk management, community relations, philan-thropic outreach and facilities services. Jordan serves on the advisory council of blount-Achieves and as a member of the board of Innovative Education Partnership, representing Clay-ton Homes as lead corporate project manager for the Clayton-Bradley STEM Academy.

He holds both bachelor’s and master’s degrees from UT.

By Sandra ClarkA drunk driving simulator will

be at Powell High School next week, part of a program called Ar-rive Alive! with support from the Powell Business and Professional Association.

The simulator will be at Powell High School Monday, April 29, from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m.

UNITE’s Arrive Alive program

uses a high-tech simulator, impact video and a number of other re-sources to educate students about the dangers of drunk driving and texting while driving. The simula-tor allows students to experience, in a controlled environment, the potential consequences of drunk and distracted driving.

One of the most commonly recognized driving distractions is

cellphone use. About 89 percent of all Americans have a cellphone, according to CTIA – The Wireless Association.

Drivers under age 20 have the highest proportion of distraction-related fatal crashes, according to the National Highway Traffi c Safety Administration. Their lack of driving experience can con-tribute to critical misjudgments if

they become distracted.Also next week, Chick-fi l-A and

Bojangles will promote seat beltusage by distributing coupons inthe parking lot.

At a wrap-up assembly on Fri-day, students who sign a commit-ment card are eligible to win $50gasoline cards and seniors canwin a $500, $1,000 or $2,000scholarship.

Arrive Alive! Driver simulation at Powell High April 29

A-2 • APRIL 22, 2013 • POWELL Shopper news

After serving the Knoxville area for years, we have been forced to close our doors forever. We have lost our lease, and are holding a

MILLION DOLLAR WALL-TO-WALL SELL-OUT!

NO ITEM WILL BE SPARED!

GOING-OUT-OF-BUSINESS SALEDON’T BE THE ONE TO MISS IT!

Due to the urgency of this sale, there will be no special orders, holds, or lay-a-ways! For your convenience, we offer many ways to buy: 90 days same as cash, up to 36 months to pay (w.a.c.), Master Card, Visa,

Discover, or cash. On-the-spot fi nancing still available.Stop by Mynatt’s Furniture if you have any questions about this going-out-of-business sale and

we will be glad to help you. Thank you for your past business.It has been a pleasure dealing with you over the years.

1 Week Only!

First Come, First Sold!EASY CREDIT TERMS •

865.922.7557(Halls Crossroads)

6805 Maynardville Hwy

FURNITURE

Emory Road

Neal Drive

Fountain Valley

I-75

Maynardville H

wy.

N

HA

LL

S CR

OSSR

OA

DS

Mynatt’sFurniture

don’t miss this event!Total Wall-To-Wall Sell-Off!

Save up to 50% or more onBRAND-NAME FURNITURE & MATTRESSES!

THE ENDIS NEAR!

FINALWEEKS!

EVERYTHING MUST GO!lost our

lease! MUSTVACATE!

CURIOCABINETS

from$229

DOUBLERECLINING

SOFA$699

VISCOMEMORY FOAM

MATTRESSfrom

$298

LIFTRECLINERS

from$588

WHEN THE FURNITURE IS GONE, SO ARE THE SAVINGS!

OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY HAS BEEN MARKED DOWN FOR LIQUIDATION!

HERE ARE JUST A FEW EXAMPLES: Sofa & Loveseat $588

4-pc Bedroom Suite $298 • Corner Sectional $988 • Bunk Beds $145Lamps $18 • Recliners $188 • 5-Pc Oak Dinette $298

Twin Mattress $58 • Coffee Table & 2 End Tables $88 • Full Mattress $68Queen Mattress $96 • King Mattress $377 • 4-Drawer Chest $68

Reclining Sectional $1,598 • Rugs $37 • Blankets $37Bed Frames $25 • Sheet Sets $18

POWELL Shopper news • APRIL 22, 2013 • A-3

Schedule YourSchedule YourSpring Maintenance Today withSpring Maintenance Today with

LASTS AND LASTS AND LASTS.™

Heating & Air Conditioning

LASTS AND LASTS AND LASTS.™

• Complete inspections, maintenance & repairs for all air conditioning & heating equipment

• Money-saving high-effi ciency system upgrades!

• FREE ESTIMATES on new equipment• FINANCING through TVA Energy Right program

We Offer:We Offer:

• Maintenance plans available.

Over 20 years experience

SALES • SERVICE • MAINTENANCE5715 Old Tazewell Pike • 687-2520

“Cantrell’s Cares”

Cindy Taylor

The Knoxville Purple Heart Chapter 356 met at Shoney’s Restaurant on April 16. Some attendees had suffered great physi-cal losses in service to our country.

Purple in Powell

tion and nonfi ction.”The Powell Branch Li-

brary will host Hunter’s book signing for “A Mouse’s Tale” 2 p.m. Saturday, May 11.

Copies of Hunter’s other books will be available.

Hunter is already hard at work on his next novel, “Tempest at the Helm,” due next year. It is a sequel to “Tempest at the Sunsphere.” Hunter’s books are also available as e-books.Reach Cindy Taylor at ctaylorsn@gmail.

com

David Hunter

But none dwelt on that. Gerald Clark was wound-

ed in World War II and is listed in the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor.

“I am so proud of my age,” said Clark. “I’m proud to be 87 years old.”

According to Clark, of the 16 million veterans who returned home from World War II, four million are still living.

“We’ve fi lled up a lot of national and private cem-eteries.”

Approximately 1.7 mil-

Three members of the Knoxville Purple Hearts Chapter 356 are combat-wounded Iraq veteran

Mark Brogan, WWII combat-wounded veteran Gerald Clark and combat-wounded Iraq veteran

Bradley Walker. Photo by Cindy Taylor

lion Purple Hearts have been awarded since 1932.

Chapter 356 of the Purple Hearts meets at noon each third Thursday at Shoney’s off Emory Road. The chap-ter is open to veterans of all branches of service who have earned a purple heart. A lifetime membership is $50.

■ ‘A Mouse’s Tale’David Hunter is back in

action with his new-est book, “A Mouse’s Tale.” One review calls it “delicious-ly dark.”

H u n t e r agrees.

“This book is probably darker than any I have written before and is more autobiographical than any of my other fi ction. It is fi ction that is based on re-al-life experiences. Some-times that makes it hard to draw the line between fi c-

Cover of Hunter’s newest

novel. Photo submitted

Powell Middle School band director Janet Roach attended the UT/Air Force game in 2006 at

which Inky Johnson was injured. Roach is pictured with Johnson and student Dalton Thomas.

‘Never give up’ From page A-1

“I believe everything happens for a rea-son. You can’t live with regrets and you can’t go back and wonder what if,” said Johnson. “Don’t play that game.”

Eighth grader Dalton Thomas heard about Johnson from his mom, Beth, who was one of Johnson’s nurses when he was recuperating at UT Hospital. Dalton plans to try out as a running back for the Powell High football team next year and was ex-cited to meet Johnson.

“I’ve been waiting to meet him since my mom fi rst told me about him,” said Dalton.

Johnson shares his story with students and community groups. He brought cop-ies of his book, “Inky.” He says he still misses the game but in spite of physical restrictions, “life is great.”

“Anytime you get to wake up, that’s astart. I have been blessed with opportuni-ties to speak and try to motivate others. Iwant to make a difference in this world.”

Teachers Adam Wright, Drew Carpen-ter and Janet Roach witnessed the hit thatchanged Johnson’s life.

“There was a silence that came over thecrowd,” said Carpenter. “100,000 peoplewere holding their breath. It was an eeriequiet. His story is super encouraging tothe students.”

Johnson attends UT football games asoften as possible. He calls Knoxville hissecond home.

“I’m a Vol for life. God has been goodto me and that Power T means a lot to me.Go Vols!”

‘Bride’s Night Out’ is Friday“Bride’s Night Out,” the third annual North Knoxville’s Best Bridal Show, will

be held 6-9 p.m. Friday, April 26, at Beaver Brook Country Club, 6800 Beaver Brook Road. The event is free for brides-to-be and one guest. Admission for additional guests is $5 each.

In addition to lots of vendors, this year’s event will feature a “cocktail party” after-work atmosphere with live music on the patio. Free heavy hors d’ouevres and drink specials throughout the night will be provided by Beaver Brook.

Info: http://www.northknoxbridal.com/ or on Facebook, https://www.facebook.com/#!/events/486877824686635/?fref=ts. “Bride’s Night Out” is sponsored by the Shopper News and South Central Media – Power 95.7 and B-97.5.

Barnyard TalesKathryn Woycik

Two beautiful barns can be seen as you drive along Gilbert Road in Knoxville. They have become a signa-ture of The Episcopal School of Knoxville.

ESK headmaster Jay Sec-or shared some of the barns’ known history. Prior to the school’s purchase, the prop-erty was a farm. The general utility barn was built in the 1930s and served the farm’s needs. The tobacco barn

The barns at The Episcopal School of Knoxville

This swirl pattern named Mon-

key Wrench appears on the

utility barn. It was selected by

the students mostly because

of its name. Photos by K. WoycikThe quilt square on the front of the former tobacco barn is the Cross and Crown pattern. On the

side is the Hunter Star pattern. Both were painted by the 7th grade students.

replaced with what is now the Bishop’s building.

The 100 acre property on Gilbert Road was purchased for the school in 2000. Se-cor recalls having a series of parties that year to sponsor the school. In its early years, the 4-H school had a chicken and pig program. Two pigs, Wagner and Petuna, lived in the former tobacco barn. Pigs were among the contes-tants entered at the Tennes-

see Valley Fair. After the winter break

this past January, three beautiful quilt squares were added to the barns. ESK communications director Melissa Anderson wanted to share their story along with art teacher Philip Hoffman.

The idea of adding the quilt squares came from Debbie Martin, treasurer of the Par-ents Association. She thought it would be a fun project for the students. She presented

the idea to Hoffman. He agreed after mulling it over. The project was funded by the Parent’s Association.

Hoffman involved his three 7th grade classes. He decided to have three sepa-rate quilts made by each class. Each class, comprised of 16 students, researched many patterns and selected several of their favorites. Hoffman picked the top three.

He wanted students to

come up with their own de-signs; choose the patterns within the main pattern, the colors and the amount of colors being used. The 8x8 wooden structures were primed and sealed front and back. The project took ap-proximately 10 weeks to com-plete and has brought much excitement and pride to the school.

Share your barn story by emailing [email protected].

was added sometime in the 1960s. The farmhouse was

It’s Spring!It’s Spring! Time to think about opening your pool! Join us for our

Join us at both locations on Join us at both locations on SAT, APRIL 27SAT, APRIL 27 for our for our

SPECIAL SIDEWALK SALE EVENTSPECIAL SIDEWALK SALE EVENT

Thinking about installing a pool?

Hours: Mon-Fri 9am-5pm • Sat 9am-2pm

Century Pool Supply Co.Century Pool Supply Co.

Spring Opening SaleSpring Opening Sale Wed, April 24 - Sat, April 27

20% OFF20% OFF (in-stock merchandise)

Above Ground Pool

3641 Magnolia Ave 546-7288

6705 Maynardville Hwy 925-3235

Join us at the Halls location for our

Door Prizes & Refreshments

Weather permitting

A-4 • APRIL 22, 2013 • POWELL Shopper newsgovernment

Halls • Powell • Fountain City • West Knoxville • Maynardville • Luttrell ׀ www.cbtn.com

Betty Bean

It didn’t take long for Knox County Democrats to fi gure out that Linda Haney is a doer.

That’s a doer in the – “Got a tent that needs pitch-ing? Need food for a potluck din-ner? Need volunteers to deliver Meals on Wheels?” – sense.

The new president of the Knox County Democratic Party and her husband, Dan, are worker bees, not drones.

“I didn’t make any prom-ises other than I will do my best and give it my all,” she said. “We will reach out into the community and bring new people into the party who can help us fi nd vi-able candidates. It’s a 2-year term and I have no aspira-tions for anything more.”

Worker bee chairs county Democrats

Linda Haney

The Haneys were motor-cycle enthusiasts who rode from their home in Florida to attend Honda Wing Dings here. They fell in love with East Tennessee, and when they decided to leave Flori-da after Hurricane Andrew in 1993, it didn’t take them long to fi gure out where they wanted to go. They’d started a highly portable mom-and-pop business selling protective eyewear to mo-torcyclists and didn’t want to endure the punishing winters in Linda’s native Il-linois. So they became “half backs.”

“We thought, ‘What a perfect place to live. We can go to motorcycle rallies and

be closer to home.’ That’s re-ally what brought us here,” Linda Haney said.

They eased into local pol-itics after going to a Demo-cratic Party meet-up and talking to party chair Jim Gray.

“He invited us to get in-volved, and Dan jumped right in. I helped him. If someone needed something done, we did it. Let’s don’t talk about it a whole long time, let’s just do it. I be-came a precinct chair, and then we were district repre-sentatives. That was prob-ably about 10 years ago.”

Knox County Democrats elected Haney 97-40 over Cindy Walker, who had been party treasurer.

“I never really thought I’d be in this position,” Haney said. “I was asked to step up to it and I had to think about it for a while. I had worked with (former party chair and now state Rep.) Gloria

Johnson and I really liked the direction she was taking the party.

“I decided I would be a good person to step up and keep things moving in the right direction, so I went forward and tried my best to win. I took advice from a lot of people who had been candidates. I went to every meeting and every club that was related to anything having to do with the party. A friend made a video and we made and distributed fl yers.

“People came out and saw me and supported me, so I was very pleased with that.”

Haney’s election was a rejection of her opposition’s suggestion that the party needed to “move away” from Johnson, who was elected state representative last year and represented one of Tennessee Democrats’ few success stories.

NOTES ■ Daniel Brown, former mayor and current City Council mem-

ber, will speak to the Third and Fourth District Democrats at

6 p.m. Tuesday, April 23, at the Bearden Branch Library, 100

Golf Club Road. Info: Lorraine Hart, 637-3293.

■ Trustee John Duncan will speak to the 8th District Republi-

can Club at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 23, at Carter High School.

VictorAshe

The remaining state prop-erty at the former Lakeshore Mental Health Institute was to be transferred to the city at the end of March, but that date has slipped to the end of April, according to deputy mayors Bill Lyons and Eddie Mannis.

Lakeshore transfer moves ahead

In fact, with only eight days left in April, it could slide into May, but both are confi dent it will happen despite efforts of state Rep. Steve Hall and Sen. Stacey Campfi eld to sell the land to private developers. Their bills have gone nowhere.

Talks between the city and state have gone on for nine months. Mannis says roughly 66 acres will be transferred to the city with the exception of Willow and Greenbrier cot-tages.

Mannis and Lyons said plans have not been fi nalized for the use of the historic main administrative building be-yond its not being demolished or neglected.

Both said the city plans to work closely with Lakeshore Park LLC, the board which oversees much of the current park and includes members such as attorney Thomas McAdams, Pilot Oil CEO Jimmy Haslam and Margaret Ritchie, along with the mayor.

A Memorandum of Under-standing between the state and city will have to go to City Council for approval to be-come effective.

This transfer will be a ma-jor step in the development of the city park system and represents the fulfi llment of dreams when over half of the land was fi rst transferred to the city in the early 1990s un-der the late Gov. McWherter and Mayor Ashe.

The park will only attract further use and attention as its signifi cance grows. There will be a cost to its acquisition which City Council should

Sherri Gardner Howell

If you live in the Far-ragut community, you are used to living with miscon-ceptions. Oh, Farragut… where’s your BMW? Far-ragut? You people are just a bunch of rich snobs. Your kids went to Farragut? You have good schools because your schools get every-thing!

I do not live within the boundaries of the town of Farragut. However, like many of us who live in West Knoxville, I consider myself a Farragut resident because my children graduated from Farragut High School.

We shop in Farragut, pull for the Admirals and against the Bulldogs, enjoy the parks and neighbor-hoods. For the most part, the misconceptions don’t bother me, because I see them as rooted in good things about my commu-nity.

Education is a priority. Churches are welcoming. Housing values give you an opportunity to save for your future. Neighborhood streets are well-main-tained, people are friendly, options for shopping, eating and playing are plentiful.

So, my fi rst reaction to hearing Bill Johns’ pro-posal that Farragut pass an ordinance requiring every homeowner to own a gun and ammunition was:

What? Did he say Far-ragut?

My second response was a prayer. Please, oh please, oh please – don’t let this hit the national news.

The ordinance that Johns proposes would have no teeth, no enforcement properties. It is what he calls a Symbolic/Marketing Ordinance. He maintains that the benefi ts to the town would be an instant real estate property value bump, a decrease in crime and a beacon to companies leaving other cities that are enacting stronger gun legis-lation to come to Farragut.

I respectfully disagree. I believe that this ordinance has no value except to make this wonderful community look like something it is not. We are not a bunch of gun-brandishing, irrespon-sible yahoos.

The police lieutenant in Kennesaw, Ga., where this is a law, said the town now

Not in my town

has “sort of a Wild West image,” which, he said, is not true.

One of the store owners in Kennesaw is quoted in a Bloomberg article as saying his best-selling T-shirt is one with two crossed pis-tols that says: “It’s the Law in Kennesaw.”

Is that the Symbolic/Marketing image the people of Farragut want? Not me.

Johns said in the guest column that started all this that the ordinance “would be welcomed by 85 percent or more” of the town’s citizens. When asked the source of the number, Johns said it was based on personal perception, the fact that the community al-ways votes in a conservative manner and the success of businesses like Gander Mountain.

The reporter in me had many questions about the “hows” of this ordnance. How would people “opt out?” If I send in an “opt out” request, does that be-come public record? What is the opinion of the town attorney?

In the end, I heard from Bill Johns, and three of the fi ve on the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: Dot LaMarche and Ron Honken and Mayor Ralph McGill. I take comfort in their responses, as all three said they would not support it. Alderman Bob Markli has said he will bring it for discussion to the board and is in favor of it. Alderman Jeff Elliott has said he was not in favor of it.

Mayor McGill did not mince words: “If Alderman Markli wants to bring this to the board’s attention, we will discuss it. I don’t think you will see a consensus that would force our hand into developing this idea into an ordinance. I want to have no part of this. This serves no purpose other than to create controversy where there is none.”

Amen.

fully inform itself about as it votes to accept the property.

There will be public hear-ings on updating the master plan for the enlarged park.

■ Democratic state Rep. Gloria Johnson skipped the vote April 8 on the constitutional amendment to prohibit a state income tax in Tennessee.

In fact, she was in the House Chamber when it came to a vote and declined to vote yes, no or present and not vot-ing.

When asked about it, she emailed, “This amendment is just Republicans wasting time and money to score political points. They need to learn how to govern and quit play-ing politics. I do not intend to play their games.”

Johnson, in my view, erred in not voting one way or the other. She will fi nd it diffi cult to explain why she sat in her chair and could not lift her fi nger to push one of the three buttons. She was not elected to skip votes whatever she thinks the motives are.

Republicans are not alone

in playing games as Demo-crats have been known to do it too. Persons opposed to a state income tax will tell you it is only a 45-year-old state Su-preme Court decision which bars an income tax. A future Supreme Court could rule differently, which was what Gov. Sundquist and many Democrats hoped 13 years ago when they pushed a state income tax.

Johnson failed to state whether she favors or opposes such a tax. Gov. Bredesen, a Democrat, opposed it.

Also, Johnson would be wise, in a district which voted by over 1,000 votes for Mitt Romney last year, to soften her attacks on Republicans when she won by less than 300 votes and will be a target in 2014.

If she wants a second term she needs to offer herself as a Schumpert, Bredesen, Ritchie type Democrat who have all won here.

Refusing to vote on a Re-publican bill will not help her if she faces a credible GOP candidate in 2014.

Commissioner Ed Shouse congratulates Eagle Scouts Samuel Stoddard and Andrew Wilson. Photo by T. Edwards of TEPHOTOS.com

Honoring Eagle Scouts

the church, while Stoddard helped at Bearden High School’s drama and band rooms. In the fall, Wilson

plans to attend Nashville Auto Diesel College, with a dual major in collision re-pair and auto mechanics,

while Stoddard will go toPurdue University to studymechanical engineeringand business.

Bearden High School se-niors Samuel Stoddard and Andrew Wilson celebrat-ed advancement to Eagle Scouts at Ebeneezer United Methodist Church. Both are in Troop 141 led by Scout-master Richard Huchison

Knox County Commis-sioner Ed Shouse presented a proclamation in honor of their accomplishments. Ma-rine Corps League Detach-ment No. 924 Commandant Laimon W. Godel Jr. award-ed a special medal to them.

Wilson’s Eagle Scout project involved upgrades at

POWELL Shopper news • APRIL 22, 2013 • A-5

ADDICTION MEDICINEWEIGHT LOSS

PRIMARY CAREAddiction is a treatable disease.

We are part of the cure, NOT the cause.

EXPRESS HEALTH CARE865-882-9900

expresshealthcare.webs.com

posture can also affect spinal development in children.

Signs of scoliosis are a high hip or uneven hips, a high shoulder, the head being off center, head tilt, back and leg pain, fatigue and stooped posture.

Chiropractic care works on correcting scoliosis and relieving symptoms and complications associated with scoliosis. To see if chiropractic may be able to help you, call 938-8700 today for a complimentary consultation.

By Dr. Donald G. Wegener

Scoliosis is a lateral curvature of the spine. Scoliosis affects boys and girls between the ages of 8 and 18. It is more common

with girls.

There are several causes of scoliosis, the two most common are congenital and habitual. Congenital scoliosis occurs when someone is born with a lateral curvature of the spine.

Habitual causes are environmental or situational depending on the habits of the individual. Carrying backpacks improperly can contribute to a spinal distortion. Poor sitting habits and practicing poor

NEWS FROM POWELL CHIROPRACTIC

Scoliosis

Dr. Wegener

Dr. Donald G. WegenerPowell Chiropractic Center

Powell Chiropractic Center7311 Clinton Hwy., Powell

865-938-8700

www.keepyourspineinline.com

MAY 3 & 4, 2013at

The Episcopal School of Knoxville

DON’T MISS THE FUN!Family Entertainment!

BANDS • CONTESTS • BBQwww.rockytopbbq.com

Space donated by

KENDRA CHANTELLE

Friday night headline entertainmentwill be American Idol fi nalist and

Loudon County native

currently on tour with her band

LAW DOGS | Betty Bean

Working-class hero

Billy Stokes was play-ing quarter tonk with a guy named Moses when he had a sudden fl ash of clarity.

A 1970 Rule High School graduate, Billy had gotten a job tending bar at Sam & Andy’s after the University of Tennessee had invited him to take a quarter off, and somehow that quarter stretched out into a year and a half as he whiled away slow afternoons between lunch and happy hour with his friends.

“It dawned on me that in 18 months, none of us had moved an inch. So I went back to school and got my degree,” he said.

Forty-plus years later, he’s a lawyer with a repu-tation for being aggressive, competent, thorough, and for winning some huge set-tlements. A politically ac-tive Republican who doesn’t mind occasionally going off the reservation – like when he supported Madeline Rogero for mayor in a non-partisan city race – he’s got a Rule High School baseball cap on one side of the shelf behind his desk and a Jel-lico cap on the other side.

In his desk drawer sits a picture, soon to be framed, of the tiny shotgun house in Lonsdale where he grew up. He’s also got a picture of the Howard Johnson’s where his mother waited tables and the ET&WNC truck his father drove for a living.

On another wall there are pictures of him with presi-dents, senators and gover-nors, including several from his stints as state commis-sioner of employment secu-rity and as special assistant

to the governor during the Don Sundquist administra-tion, including one of him dressed in full Santa Claus drag sitting on the back of his Harley-Davidson.

“I’m an old school dude. I like to ride motorcycles, go fi shing and am pretty much true to my southern Appa-lachian roots. I’m probably a typical Scots-Irish male. Whether you got money or I got money, we’re all even. Doesn’t matter who you are.

“Redneck? That’s all right with me. Pretentious is probably not something anybody calls me – I hope. RINO (Republican In Name Only)? I don’t care. Mad-eline Rogero was by far the best candidate in that fi eld of three. A chief executive needs to be a competent manager.”

Growing up His family originally

came from Saxton, Ky., just across the state line from Jellico, before they moved to Knoxville. His mother, Thelma, is 89 and still liv-ing independently. His fa-ther, J.P., died in 1999 and was a truck driver for a com-pany called East Tennessee/Western North Carolina – ET-WNC.

“We called it ‘Eat Taters and Wear No Clothes.’ ”

When he was little, he spent weekends in Jellico with his grandparents while his mother waited tables in the D&M, which formally stood for Davenport and Miller, but was popularly called the Devil’s Mansion. He’s the youngest of three children, and Stokes says his family was faring much

better fi nancially by the time he hit adolescence.

“Jimmy Hoffa negotiated a national contract for the Teamsters, and I was the only kid at home, so I had it a lot easier than my brother and sister. I grew up work-ing-class, and that’s what we need more of today.”

So how did this son of a Teamster become a Repub-lican?

“You’ll have to remember – Hoffa didn’t have much use for the Kennedys. A lot of Teamsters were Republi-cans at that time.”

After he fi nished up at Rule, Stokes enrolled in Maryville College to play football, but injured his “good” shoulder. He’d al-ready had surgery on his left shoulder after his senior season.

That forced a decision: “Being short and slow, I

decided to quit football and go to UT.”

Becoming a copAfter his Sam & Andy’s

epiphany, he went back to school full-time, support-ing himself by working at the General Products ware-house. He graduated in 1975 with a major in psychology and minors in political sci-ence and sociology, and started thinking about what to do next.

Like so many Lonsdale boys before him, he became a cop.

Theondrad “Sarge” Jack-son, a retired sergeant from both the U.S. Army and the Knoxville Police De-partment and proprietor of Sarge’s BBQ on Texas Av-enue (famous for its C’mon

Billy Stokes in his office with Rule High School and Jellico ball caps on the shelf behind him. Photo by Betty Bean

Back Smoke) helped him get hired under a federal pro-gram at KPD. He was there for less than two years when the new safety director de-cided to eliminate the pro-gram.

“I got laid off in June of ’76, and started law school in September of ’76. That’s when I met Richard Bean.”

He counts the director of the Richard Bean Juvenile Detention Center as one of the three most infl uential men in his life, along with his father and longtime Republican political boss Loy Smith. Two old police offi cers, Rass Scruggs and Calvin Housewright, rec-ommended that Bean hire Stokes while he was in law school.

“I benefi tted from the good ol’ boy system. I worked 3-11 and Juvenile Judge Richard Douglass gave me the key to his of-fi ce with his law library and I’d sneak over to the court side to study. During fi nals, Richard would go home and eat supper and then come in and work for me while I’d go sit in the judge’s of-fi ce and study. We were on the quarter system, so we’d go through this every two or three months, and Rich-ard would take care of me because he wanted me to get through law school. We were kindred spirits. I brag about working full-time through law school, but if Richard hadn’t helped me, I never could have done it.”

Stokes got his law degree in 1979 and joined the Army JAG Corps, where he served three years.

Another thing Bean did for him was to introduce him to Bay Crawford, a schoolteacher from Roa-noke who worked at Shan-nondale Elementary School. They’ve been married for 33 years, have two daugh-ters, three granddaughters and a grandson on the way. They are also active mem-

bers of Second Presbyterian Church.

Entering politicsStokes came back home

in 1982 and went to work for Bond, Carpenter and O’Connor, and became president of the 5th District Republican Club (at Bean’s urging). In 1984, Bean and Loy Smith urged Stokes to run for county GOP chair. He served nearly four years.

“It required me to be a lot more partisan than I nor-mally am. I’m an old school conservative and I believe that compromise is not only possible but benefi cial. Howard Baker and Bob Dole are my heroes.”

He has good memories of his two years with Sun-dquist, particularly of work-ing with leaders of both parties on the 1996 Work-ers Compensation Act, and of taking on the state’s tire recycling program. His fa-vorite memory is the time he spent as Tennessee’s point person on the Ocoee Olympic events at a time when the Atlanta Olympics committee was considering pulling the plug on kayak-ing and canoeing.

He returned to Knox-

ville in 1997, and two things happened that altered his world:

Loy Smith died suddenly, and Stokes’ law partner, Da-ryl Fansler, a Democrat, ran for chancellor. Stokes sup-ported Fansler, upsetting many Republicans.

After Fansler departed for the bench, Stokes put together the highly success-ful fi rm that has become Stokes, Williams, Sharp & Davies.

In 2004, he took on something that he calls “a serious miscalculation,” running against state Rep. Jamie Hagood for state Sen-ate and losing badly.

“I’d suffered a pretty seri-ous injury the year before in a fall-down, and I decided that life is short and you bet-ter grab it fast. I had some people encouraging me, and a lot of great help and I’d al-ways wanted to serve in that capacity.

“But I ran an inept cam-paign. I wish I hadn’t gotten beat quite so badly and I let a lot of good people down, but otherwise I’ve moved on.”

And then he grinned:“Tim Hutchison got beat

worse.”

You’ve heard our opinion, what’s yours?

facebook.com/ShopperNewsNow

A-6 • APRIL 22, 2013 • POWELL Shopper news

Mission Statement: To improve the quality of life of all those God places in our path by building on our experiences of the past, pursuing our vision for the future and creating caring life-long relationships.

Offi ce is independently owned and operated.

Larry & Laura BaileyJustin Bailey

Jennifer Mayes947-9000

2322 W. Emory Rd.www.knoxvillerealty.com

1-800-237-5669

We’re back inPOWELL!

NEW LOCATION:1715 Depot St. • 567-2654

www.amazingwigsboutique.comFormerly “Across The Creek”

New Wig

Arrivals!

FTN CITY – Convenient location! Close to I-75 & shopping. Move-in ready. This 2BR/2BA, 1-level has 1-car gar. A must see. $105,000 (835692)

POWELL – 3BR/1.5BA rancher featuring: LR, eat-in kit, DR, rec rm w/wood stove, mstr w/half BA & 15x14 offi ce off mstr. Fenced yard, plenty of stg w/attached 1-car carport, detached 2-car carport & detached 19x19 gar w/carport stg on either side. $155,000 (835832)

POWELL – 3BR/2.5BA, 2-story w/bonus. Featuring: Hdwd & cork flooring, LR w/cork floors & gas FP. Wired for surround sound, mstr suite w/shower & whirlpool tub, covered front porch & back deck. Several energy effi cient updates. Fenced backyard. New roof to be installed. $219,900 (822342)

HALLS – 3BR/2.5BA features: Rec rm down w/stone FP & half BA/laundry rm, LR/DR combo, covered back deck, stg bldg on corner wooded lot. Updates: HVAC 1yr, water heater 1yr, windows in 2003. $129,900 (801011)

HALLS – 3BR/2BA brick rancher on 3.3+ acres w/barn. Fea-tures: formal LR, den off kit, offi ce & utility rm. Barn was formerly used as apartment w/utility rm, hay loft & pull-in bay. Level lot great loca-tion convenient to Emory Rd & I-75. Reduced $219,900 (810044)

HALLS – Convenient location! 2BR/2BA planned unit develop-ment features: Open flr plan, 2-car gar, sun rm/fam rm, LR w/gas FP & private setting in back. Several updates including: Tile backsplash in kit, new comfort height toilets & newer roof in front. $149,900 (838447)

HALLS – 2-story, 3BR/2.5BA w/bo-nus features: Granite countertops throughout, lg eat-in kit, formal LR/office on main, formal DR, fam rm open to kit w/gas FP, lg mstr suite w/dbl vanity, shower & whirlpool tub. Great level corner lot. Flooring allowance w/accept-able offer. Reduced. $249,900 (819912)

HALLS – 5BR/3BA w/bonus. Features: BR w/full BA on main, bonus rm up w/wallk-up attic stg. Eat-in Kit wired for Jenn-Air in island & has 2 pantrys, crown molding, 22x12 screened porch overlooking private wooded backyard. $299,900 (820066)

HALLS – All brick, 4BR/3BA, 1.5 story w/neighborhood pool, tennis court & lake. Open split BR fl r plan, mstr suite w/tray ceilings, sep vanities, whirlpool & shower. Home theater rm w/furniture & equipment. Full BA up w/4th BR or offi ce. Sur-round sound throughout, lots of stg. $359,900 (816984)

HALLS – 33+ acres great devel-opment potential or multiple homesites. Seller will divide. $549,900 (810054)

N KNOX – Shadow fl r plan, the largest in subdivision. This 2BR/2BA w/2-car gar features: 19x14 courtyard, eat-in kit, LR/DR combo, mstr suite w/ walk-in closet & window seat. New 2012 roof & gutters. Redurced. $119,900 (821642)

N KNOX – Convenient loca-tion close to shopping & res-taurants. This 3BR/2BA rancher sits on wooded lot at end of street. 1-car attached gar. $124,900 (823001)

POWELL – Convenient lo-cation! 1+ acre. This 3BR farm house features: 1-car attached, 2-car detached gar, 2-stg bldgs & tons of stg in walk-out unfi nished bsmt. $99,900 (838646)

CrossCurrents

LynnHutton

Marvin West

You have seen what I did to the Egyptians, and how I bore you on eagles’ wings and brought you to myself.

(Exodus 19: 4 NRSV)

Who sent you to bring me in from the cold?Logic points to the dark prince of fl ame, butwhen did reason ever explain resurrection?A gift so painfully given comes only from the One who understandsall hurts, all joys, whose handswe fall into, who raises uson the wings of eagles.

(“How Are You Fallen?” from “Guardians,” Laura Still)

The phrase was coined by a Knoxville author whose name I have long since forgotten. He wrote about a char-

In from the cold

acter who was “freezing to death in front of a roaring fire.”

I think that – on one oc-casion or another – most of us are guilty of that par-ticular sin.

He meant that we hu-mans sometimes refuse the comfort, the joy, the peace, the love that is offered to us free for the taking. Call it stubbornness, or stupid-ity or blindness. Call it be-

Sometimes there is no way to win.

Jimmy Cheek, chancellor of the University of Tennes-see, might not win a popular-ity vote from football fans.

Innocent though he may be, Jimmy is perceived as part of the problem. His goal of academic excellence, making UT one of the top re-search schools in the country, is thought to be a stumbling block, even a blockade to football success.

One of my favorite fans has made a study of Dr. Cheek. That he consorted with Flor-ida Gators for 34 years is ap-parently a serious offense. That he had trouble deciding whether Bruce Pearl was right or wrong was waffl ing at its worst. That he was slow to stop milking the athletic de-partment for funds indicated a lack of understanding.

Cheek got his latest X as host for the awards banquet recognizing outstanding

Chancellor awards, Vandy coach, other tidbits

achievement. Nineteen ath-letes were honored for awe-some academics. They rep-resented basketball, softball, tennis, golf, swimming, track, volleyball, even rowing.

Alas, Dr. Cheek searched everywhere, high and low, but could not fi nd super foot-ball scholars.

***A segment of the popula-

tion is uncomfortable with-out constant change. Tra-dition doesn’t mean much. Anything older than last Tuesday is out of date.

The restless bunch may not want to paint the Wash-ington Monument like a bar-

ber pole but there is an urge to “tweak” Tennessee football uniforms. The correct color of orange shirts and white pants is just so old-fashioned.

Some argue that change is a marketing plus. Some say “give the kids whatever they want.” Some just want any-thing different, like Oregon.

Some loved the Hallow-een black jerseys of 2009. They found that coach oh, so exciting.

Some are researching cam-oufl age and progressive color combinations Butch Jones used in Cincinnati. They do believe change is in the air.

OK, I am old-fashioned but I can tolerate subtle al-teration. Just don’t mess with the basics, orange, white, checkerboards and power T. What say you?

***I try to avoid it but I

thought of Lane Kiffi n 2009 and that triggered another

invasive thought: Vanderbilt coach James Franklin, 41, sometimes acts like Lane.

Franklin, man of the year according to the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame, is very popular among Vandy fans. They are so happy to have ex-perienced back-to-back bowl games, even if one was in Nashville. Vanderbilt is still celebrating the historic nine-win season, even though the schedule was soft. Vanderbilt really liked that 41-18 rip job on the Volunteers. Imagine taking a knee to avoid run-ning up the score. Hey, hey, hey.

Beating Tennessee is seri-ous business. Taunting Ten-nessee fans must be fun.

It so happens the Tennes-see power T was upside down in a Vandy video about re-cruiting results. It could have been passed off as a typo-graphical error except it was twice upside down.

Franklin went into the Vandy stands during a spring scrimmage and presented a black sweatshirt to a boy wearing an orange shirt. The coach suggested a cover-up.

Franklin denies disdain for all things orange. He says

he has tremendous respect for UT history, tradition, etc. He says he is trying to build the black and gold. In so do-ing, if he tears off a little or-ange hide, it is incidental – collateral damage.

His latest recruiting line is “Make a decision based on the big picture and not the shiny things that people get excited about: weight room, size of stadium and things like that.”

Nothing personal, mind you.

***Tennessee and Alabama

conducted football coaching clinics on the same weekend. We had trouble counting but the Vols attracted somewhere between 500 and 1,000 high school coaches. The Tide drew maybe 1,600.

Tennessee offered Pey-ton Manning as star attrac-tion. Alabama also had an NFL look, Sean Payton, Dick Vermeil, Chuck Pagano and Herm Edwards.

Butch Jones was promi-nent at the UT clinic. Some guy named Saban spoke in Tuscaloosa.Marvin West invites reader reaction. His

address is [email protected].

ing crippled, or fearful or broken. Whatever one calls it, sometimes it is true.

We allow ourselves to freeze to death in front of a roaring fire. We are unable – for whatever reason – to believe that someone (or Someone!) has loved us, loves us now and will love us in the future. Forever, steadfastly, extravagantly.

The alternative, of course, is to do that which we are so fearful of doing: taking a chance. Permit love to sneak up on us, to take us by surprise and to give ourselves over to it wholeheartedly.

The same can be said for a life in Christ.

We can run from him, or hold him at arm’s length

or actively push him away. But if we are willing to be in relationship with Christ, we can come to know peace and joy. We can learn ful-fillment and usefulness. We can figure out what it means to trust, to grow, to give, to love.

That means, of course, that we will have to allow ourselves to be brought “in from the cold.”

There is risk involved, and uncertainty, to be sure.

But love is a fire that will warm and protect and heal, a gift that will nur-ture and encourage and tend.

Love is a hand that we fall into, and a home that will abide.

Common Core is the internationally competi-tive academic standards that prepare students for college or entry-level jobs. In 2010, Tennessee joined 47 other states in creating standards in math and English that hold all K-12 students to the same quality educa-tional level. If students move from one state to another, they will face the same expectations and approach. Knox County began applying new math standards this year and will add English next year.

Skills students learn are needed for success in today’s workforce: teamwork, critical thinking and problem-solving. In math, they don’t just learn 3x3=9 but consider differ-ent ways this problem could be solved. They must also explain how they reached the an-swer.

In English, stu-dents are urged to think critically. They interpret what is writ-ten and justify the reasoning behind their interpretation. Close reading and in-terpretation skills ap-ply in all disciplines.

Common core stan-dards are more rigor-ous; students learn im-portant concepts at an earlier age. They place more emphasis on real understanding than on memorization. They are coordinated within each grade level so that con-cepts are built on each year.

More information about the new stan-dards and examples of tests can be found at www.tncore.org.

News from SOS

POWELL Shopper news • APRIL 22, 2013 • A-7

By Cindy TaylorFirst Baptist Church Pow-

ell has been reaching people throughout the county with church plants and off-cam-pus locations. From April 28 to May 12, the church is inviting everyone to visit the Powell location for a Life Ac-tion Revival Summit.

The Life Action team will present messages and wor-ship focused on God’s life-giving truths through a se-ries of evening services and seminars.

The summit will begin at 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. Sundays beginning April 28 and con-tinue at 6:30 p.m. Monday – Thursday with special ser-

vices on Saturdays. It will feature instructional teach-ing, family seminars, music, and programs for children and youth. The focus will be on living out biblical values and principles practically. Church receptionist Amy Combs attended the summit in the past.

“The summit is biblically oriented and focused on God’s word,” said Combs. “The practical application of theology for me as a mother, daughter, sister and Chris-tian was fantastic.”

First Baptist Church Powell is located at 7706 Ewing Rd. in Powell. Info: 947-9074.

First Baptist Church Powell mission department members discuss the upcoming summit: e lder Tim McGhee, ministry director Tom Langston, minister to internationals Emmanuel Ihim, missions and evangelism secretary Melanie McCarty and inner-city ministry director Richard Brittain. Photo by Cindy Taylor

First Baptist Powell to host revival summit

Do You Need Help?D Y N d H l ?

www.caretn.com

We Can Help. Call Today.

DAYSPRING CO-OP

is

NOW ENROLLING for

2013-2014 Schoolyear!

906 Callahan Drive

We invite you to come to our

OPEN HOUSEand SCIENCE FAIR

April 25 • 6:00pm - 7:30pmOur co-op offers ABECKA and A.C.E. curriculum. We meet 4 days

a week and offer field trips and extra-curricular activities. For more information call Cheryl Gibson 266-9507

By Wendy SmithThe Knox Area Rescue

Ministries’ equation for helping the homeless is “Rescue + Relationships = Restoration.” The relation-ship part of the equation is what most folks don’t know about, says KARM donor relations director John Gar-gis.

“Our ultimate goal is for the homeless to end up in a church.”

Gargis spoke to the Saints Alive! senior group at First Baptist Church of Knoxville last week. Knoxville’s home-less population is expand-ing, and the fastest-growing segment is women with children, according to his video presentation. KARM has had to adapt and grow to be able to serve over 225 people each day.

The shelter at KARM can house up to 250 men and 100 women. The women’s dormitory was recently ex-

panded, and Gargis is proud of attractive space that now includes a community room.

“You can’t just say, ‘Jesus loves you. Here’s your mat. Go lie on the fl oor.’”

The former women’s dor-mitory has been converted into a family emergency residence that offers tempo-rary housing to women with children. Local churches take over when families come to KARM, he says.

He’s also proud of Launch Point, a four-week program that prepares KARM clients to live and work in the com-munity. Participants spend two weeks fi nding their gifts and two weeks working on God’s plan for their lives, he says. At the end of the class, each participant is assigned a mentor. A new transitional housing unit further pre-pares men for independent living.

Gargis showed the group

renderings of a new KARM courtyard that is currently under construction. The area will provide a safe, en-closed space with shade and seating, and will be a suit-able location for daily wor-ship services.

KARM provides a job training program through the Abundant Life Kitchen, a partnership with Second Harvest Food Bank of East Tennessee, and Clean Street janitorial services. A cater-ing company also creates profi ts that help run KARM.

KARM Thrift Stores em-ploy clients and put $2.5 mil-lion back into the nonprofi t each year, says Gargis.

■ First Baptist has 1,300 active members, and approximately 100 of those are over 80, says Dave Ward, minister of pastoral care.

■ Saints Alive! meets on fourth Thursdays for lunch and education or en-tertainment, says found-

John Gargis of Knox Area Res-cue Ministries talks to the First Baptist Church of Knoxville’s Saints Alive! group. Photo by

Wendy Smith

KARM adapts to meet needs of homeless

i ng member Jim Lyle. The meeting also provides an opportunity for the Golden Notes, First Baptist’s senior choir, to practice. The choir traveled to Branson, Mo., last weekend to perform in nursing homes.

WORSHIP NOTES

Food banks ■ Cross Roads Presbyterian

hosts the Halls Welfare Ministry food pantry 6-8 p.m. each second Tuesday and 9-11 a.m. each fourth Saturday.

■ Glenwood Baptist Church, 7212 Central Ave Pike, is accepting morning appointments for the John 5 Food Pantry. Info/appointments: 938-2611.

■ Knoxville Free Food Market, 4625 Mill Branch Lane, distributes free food 10 a.m.-1 p.m. each third Saturday. Info: 566-1265.

■ New Hope Baptist Church Food Pantry distributes food boxes 5-6:30 p.m. each third Thursday. Info: 688-5330.

■ Bookwalter UMC offers One Harvest Food Ministries to the community. Info and menu: http://bookwalter-umc.org/oneharvest/index.html or 689-3349, 9 a.m.-noon. weekdays.

■ Ridgeview Baptist Church off ers a Clothes Closet free of cost for women, men and children in the Red Brick Building, 6125 Lacy Road. Open to the public 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. every second Saturday.

Meetings, classes ■ Knoxville Fellowship

Luncheon meets at noon each Tuesday at Golden Corral. Info: www.kfl-luncheon.com.

Special programs ■ The Church at Sterchi Hills,

904 Dry Gap Pike, invites all musicians and singers to visit and possibly join the worship team. Sunday service starts at 10:30 a.m.

■ Powell Presbyterian Church, 2910 W. Emory Road offers Wednesday Night Community Dinner for $2 at 6 p.m. followed by “After Dinner Special”: April 24, “The Andy Griffith Show”; May 1, “Military Care Packages”; May 8, 15, 22: “Bingo.” Come for the food and stay for the fun. Info: www.powellpcusa.org.

Youth programs ■ Beaver Ridge UMC is

holding registration for its children’s weekday programs: Preschool, Parents Day Out or Summer T-N-T. Info: 531-2052 or email [email protected] or [email protected]. Info packets are also available in the church family life center. Website: www.beaverridgeumc.org.

Camping out for doughnutsPowell High School students Logan Davison, Tim Niemeyer and Chase Davison camped out in Farragut for two nights in order to be among the fi rst 100 customers in the door at the new Krispy Kreme Doughnuts on Kingston Pike. Each received a card that gives them one dozen free doughnuts each month for one year. “It’s just fun,” said Logan. “And we were told we could use the coupons at the Krispy Kreme on Broadway.” Photo by S.G. Howell

Medical professionals needed for Clinton RAM

A Remote Area Medical Clinic is scheduled for Sept. 21-22 in Clinton, and dentists, dental assistants and hygienists, vision professionals, physicians and nurses are needed.

The signups begin Wednesday, May 1, and must be done online.

Info: www.RAMUSA.org, email [email protected] or call 254-2370.

7049 Maynardville Pike • 922-4136

Count on us.

June 3 -July 26

A-8 • APRIL 22, 2013 • POWELL Shopper news kids

K K K K K K K K K

K K K K K K K K K K

K K K K K K K K K

K K K K K K K K K KAt Kellems you get what you pay for...a cubic yard is a cubic yard!

Wholesale Mulch Yard

BEST TOPSOIL & COMPOST IN TOWN!

1100 E. Emory Rd.

“Making great products at even better prices makes it easy!” ~ Tim & Katy Kellems

Is Growing Again!

865-977-7500

NOWOPEN!

Buy Direct From The Manufacturer & Save!Buy Direct From The Manufacturer & Save!Product 1/2 Yard Scoop Cubic Yard 5 Yards & Up 10 Yards & Up

GRAND OPENING SPECIALS – 1100 E. Emory Road

Economy Colored Mulch Black Brown (when available)

HardwoodPremium BarkBlack BeautyEnviro Black Brown & Brick Red

$15.00$10.00$12.00$17.00$17.00

$28.00$18.00$23.00$33.00$33.00

$25.00$18.00$20.00$30.00$30.00

$25.00$16.00$18.00$28.00$28.00

Plus much, much more!

New Economy Colors

starting at $28/Yard

By Cindy TaylorPowell High School senior

Clay Payne was presented the Johnny Mauer Award by the Optimist Club of Knoxville on April 12. It is given to a se-nior at each school who best combines academic achieve-ment and athletic accom-plishment in a varsity sport.

During his high school ca-reer, Payne played baseball and was named All District in basketball for the Pan-thers, but has decided to pur-sue baseball in college.

“I like both sports but felt like I had a better opportu-nity for a scholarship in base-ball,” said Payne, who has signed to play with Jackson State on a full scholarship.

His coaches say as a base-ball player he is versatile and can play most any position.

“I have coached Clay all four years,” said Powell High baseball coach Jay Scarbro. “He is hard-working and fun to coach because he is willing to do whatever you ask of him whether in the classroom or on the fi eld. He is outstand-ing and just about everything you could want in a player.”

Clay’s parents Lee and Kristian Payne are Powell High graduates.

Powell’s got ‘Skills!’

Cosmetology students at Powell High School have got

Johnny Mauer Award win-

ner and Powell Panther Clay

Payne Photos by Cindy Taylor

Alyssa Rossini gets an ear checkup from Knox County Schools

audiologist Aimee Biddle.

Breanna Loy will participate

in Skills USA as an observer.

Juniors Hailey Oldham and

Alex York will participate

in Skills USA Occupational

Suitcase Design.

Senior Calla Chrysler applies makeup to junior Lakin Orick in

preparation for state Skills USA competition.

Payne wins Mauer Awardit goin’ on! They competed at the Tennessee Valley Fair, placed at regionals and are headed to the Skills USA state competition in Chattanooga, where they will represent Powell High in Cosmetology, Nails, Es-thetics and Occupational Suitcase Design.

Skills USA is a partnership of students, teachers and in-dustry working together to ensure America has a skilled workforce by helping stu-dents excel at their craft.

Alex York, Calla Chrysler, Hailey Oldham, Lakin Orick and instructor Lisa Marie Butcher will make the trip to Chattanooga this week. Bre-anna Loy will participate as an observer.

“I am so proud of my girls and the time and effort they have put towards their achievements in cosmetol-ogy,” said Butcher.

Mobile hearingThe Knox County Schools

system-wide screening and hearing services van is on the move. Last week the van stopped at Powell Elemen-tary.

Students in kindergarten and 3rd grade along with 1st graders new to the Knox County school system were given a free hearing screen-ing. This is a state-mandated routine service performed yearly by the Pupil Personnel Department of Knox County Schools.

“Undetected hearing loss can impact a child’s educa-tion by how he or she is able to perform in the classroom academically,” said Knox County Schools special edu-cation supervisor Teresa Clark.

A printed report was made available to the parents of students who were screened. Parents with concerns about their child’s hearing can con-tact the Hearing Services de-partment at 539-3046.

Closing chorusThe Powell High School

chorus presented its spring chorale last week. All choral members performed except for the Powell High School Singers. This was the fi nal performance of the school year for the combined groups.

The Powell High School Singers will close out the sea-son with a performance at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 7. Admis-sion is free.Reach Cindy Taylor at ctaylorsn@gmail.

com

Powell High School cosmetology students going to the Skills USA competition are Breanna Loy, Hai-

ley Oldham, Alex York, Lakin Orick, Calla Chrysler and instructor Lisa Marie Butcher.

POWELL Shopper news • APRIL 22, 2013 • A-9

An experienced gastroenterologist giving comprehensive care.

7551 Dannaher Drive

Powell, TN 37849

Dr. Pickholtz is an experienced gastroenterologist dedicated to providing

comprehensive care to patients with a variety of gastrointestinal disorders.

His areas of interest include diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic

procedures, including ERCP, diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory bowel

disease and hepatitis C treatment.

Paul S. Pickholtz, M.D., FACP Board Certified in Gastroenterology

Call for an appointment: 865-859-7330

Tennova.com

1-855-836-6682Member of the medical staff

Shopper-News Presents Miracle Makers

Knox County Council PTA Nominate a Miracle Maker by calling (865) 922-4136.

Acknowledging the

Children of todayBy Sandra Clark

Cindy Bosse is proud of her staff and students at Sterchi Elementary School.

A Farragut resident and veteran edu-cator, Bosse would be fi rst to say a great school is a team effort. She, like many others, feels slightly uncomfortable with the moniker “Miracle Maker.”

Yet when Knox County Schools asked for proposals for a technology grant, a 9-member team (three teachers, two parents, librarian, GT coach, principal and assistant principal) at Sterchi made the very best presentation.

That’s the opinion of this writer who trekked to the central offi ce to review all 28 requests. (Ironically, for technology proposals, all are on paper and stored in a cardboard box on the 14th fl oor.)

Read Sterchi’s summary:“What makes Sterchi stand above

the rest is acknowledging the differ-ence between the children of yesterday and those of today.

“Jackson and Sydney (kids used as examples) are Digital Natives. They are engaged through technology.

“We are primed to take the next steps to seamlessly integrate further technology into the daily learning process. We would welcome the op-portunity to be a pilot school for Knox County Schools’ new comprehensive, instructional technology initiative to support personalized student learning for all our students and then to readily share our experience.”

Tech-rich worldBosse says the integration of tech-

nology throughout her school will support a personalized learning envi-ronment. That’s good for teachers and great for kids.

“Our goal is to enable students to develop the necessary skills to thrive in a fast-paced, continuously evolving, technology-rich world,” she wrote.

“Teachers are growing daily in their understanding, vision and readiness to implement a comprehensive, in-structional technology initiative as a next step in their journey to ensure success for every child.”

Bosse then outlined a day in the lives of two fi ctional stu-dents – 4th grad-er Jackson and his 1st grade sister, Sydney, in the spring of 2014 after Sterchi has implemented the technology grant.

Those scenarios use words that I don’t know. For instance, I can’t help but see a Promethean ActivBoard bursting into fl ames. Maybe that’s the

reason for its name.At any rate, the method of instruc-

tion is very, very different from the way previous generations learned.

Sterchi is truly preparing for the children of today.

Current practiceBosse says the Sterchi staff al-

ready uses many tools of technology.“Our teachers currently differ-

entiate instruction through small groups, Fast Math, Voyager, Ticket to Read, Accelerated Reader, novel studies, and web quests.”

This year Sterchi started two new after-school programs:

All Star Tutoring is for students in grades 3-5 who were

identifi ed based on standardized test scores and teach-er recommenda-

tions. The goal is to increase achieve-

ment and shrink the gap between the economical-

ly disadvantaged and non-economi-cally disadvantaged students.

The All SySTEMs Go after-school program challenges the highest achieving 4th and 5th grad-ers. Students meet with the media

Sterchi’s technology coach Lou Jones, students Max Tsetsakis and Megha Patel, and princi-pal Cindy Bosse spend time in the school’s library. The school was one of 11 selected for Knox County Schools’ technology grant. Photos by Ruth White

Sterchi School got a $200 boost last week from the Fountain City Business and Professional Association. President Andrew Hartung and board member John Fugate met with assistant principal Jessica Schaefer (standing) and Family Fun Night co-chairs Stacey Cox and Stephanie Riff ey in the school’s media center. Family Fun Night raised $8,000 which will be used to purchase school technol-ogy. “We enjoy being able to put money back in to this community,” said Fugate.

specialist and GT coach for science, technology, engineering and math projects.

Sterchi is not a struggling school. The school report card shows an A in academic achievement in all subjects. And even though 44 percent of the students receive free or reduced price meals, Sterchi ranked fi fth among all Knox County elementary schools in percent of students profi cient or ad-vanced in reading, science and social studies, and sixth in the county in math. The Value Added state report card grades are an A in math, reading and social studies and a B in science.

“Our school has developed a powerful, collaborative culture that capitalizes on everyone’s strengths,” Bosse wrote.

ImplementationBosse said the technology will not

be rolled out by grade level or sub-ject. No, at Sterchi the implementa-tion plan is called “all hold hands and jump in together.” She threw in some more verbiage to impress the committee (It worked!), but isn’t that a wonderful statement?

“All hold hands and jump in to-gether.”

And that, my friends the politi-cians, must be the theme for fund-ing the technology component of this year’s school board budget.

Let’s acknowledge the difference between the children of yesterday and those of today. And give these kids the tools to learn.

A-10 • APRIL 22, 2013 • POWELL Shopper news

FARM FRESH PRODUCE

FRESH MEAT ITEMS NOT AVAILABLE IN ALL LOCATIONS – VISIT WWW.MYUGO.COM FOR THESE LOCATIONS

OUR MISSION IS TO SERVE TELL US HOW WE’RE DOING! [email protected]

Due to our unique purchasing opportunities, quantities may be limited.So Shop Early for the Best Bargains.

EBT GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

100% SATISFACTIONMORE BARGAINS FOR ANY BUDGET.We now have Gluten Free, Sugar Free, and Organic Products. Items are

limited and vary by store and available while quantities last.We specialize in liquidations, closeouts & irregulars.

QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED. Not all items available in all locations

14 CTLIGHT PINK LEMONADE SINGLES .... 2 FOR $1.00

DRYER SHEETS - 40 CT ...................................79¢

CHICKEN OR TURKEY GRAVY - 7.5 OZ ....................... 79¢ HASHBROWNS - 32 OZ ................................$1.19

PIZZA - 10 OZ ..............................................$1.00

LIGHT TUNA POUCH - 2.5 OZ. ..........................69¢

FRESH BUTTERY TASTE SPREAD - 15 OZ. ....$1.79

8 OZ.CHICKEN PASTA WITH PEAS AND CARROTS ....$1.00

USDA BONELESS BOTTOMROUND ROAST..............

$2.99 LB.FAMILY PACK FRESH 73/27 GROUND BEEF (3 LBS. OR MORE) ..

$2.49 LB.FAMILY PACK FRESH 73/27GROUND BEEF PATTIES

$2.69 LB.JAMESTOWNBONELESS HAMS .............

$1.49 LB.

JAMESTOWNSPIRAL HAMS ..................

$1.29 LB.USDA FAMILY PACK BEEF CUBE STEAK ORBEEF STEW MEAT .............

$3.29 LB.

USDA CHOICE BLACK CANYON ANGUS

BONELESS TOP SIRLOIN STEAK

$$339999 $$119999

35534024

CAROLINABBQ SAUCE

ASSORTEDFRUIT CUPS

PRICES GOOD APRIL 21 THRU 27, 2013

FAMILY PACK FRESHSIRLOIN

PORK CHOPS

FAMILY PACKCHICKEN

DRUMSTICKS

10 LB. CHUB FRESH73/27 GROUND

BEEF

AUTO LEMONDISH DETERGENT

BACKYARD GRILLIN VEGGIE

BURGERS

SAVORY SAUTE

EXPRESS

BUFFALO CHICKEN DIP

MAYO

IDAHOPOTATOES

FRESH EXPRESS OLD FASHION OR

3 COLOR SLAW

BABY PEELEDCARROTS

YELLOW ORZUCCHINI SQUASH

COMPAREAT

$2.76

FLAVOREDSAUTÉSAUCE

65 OZ.

12 OZ.

130 CT.

17.5 OZ.

6 OZ.

10 LB. BAG 16 OZ.

BAG

16 OZ. BAG

ORANGE, LIME, OR SUGAR-FREE LIME OR CHERRYGELATIN

HOMESTYLE FROZENREADY TO BAKEBISCUITS

$$112929FRESH SIRLOINPORK ROAST ....................

$1.29 LB.

FAMILY PACKCHICKEN THIGHS ............99¢ LB.

TURKEY CHEDDAR

SUBS

6 OZ.

ASSORTED FROZEN FRUIT - 10-12 OZ .........$1.19

FRESH GRADE ALARGEEGGS

DOZEN

2FOR

$$11

$$110000$$229999

COMPAREAT UP TO

$3.48

COMPAREAT

$1.88

COMPAREAT

$3.50

COMPAREAT

$1.50

3.7 OZ.

9999¢¢

$$1100 00

LB. LB.LB. LB.

30 OZ.

$$1179798 OZ.

WOW$$110000$$110000 LB.

.44-3 OZ.

WOW

WOW WOW

4FOR

$$11

$$114949WOW WOW

$$110000WOW

$$119999WOW $$119999WOW

WOW

WOW WOW WOW

$100

$$15159999

7979¢¢WOW

WE NOW SELL BLACK CANYON ANGUS USDA CHOICE BEEF

www.myugo.comFind us in Halls Crossing next to Fred’s

PRICES GOOD APRIL 21 THRU APRIL 27, 2013Gift Card

6818 Maynardville Highway •922-4800Sun 10-6 •Mon-Sat 8-9

POWELL Shopper news • APRIL 22, 2013 • A-11

7537 Brickyard Rd, Powell • 865-859-9414

The mistakes gold sellers make most

often, and how you can avoid getting the “golden fl eece” Yvette

Martinez

As Featured on WBIR

LIVE AT 5 and WVLT

Visit www.wbir.com to read the full article featuring Knox Gold

Exchange

Ts

ofcan“g

Ao

Laa

Vito r

CASHCASHGOLD!GOLD!for your

I-75N, Emory Rd. exit. Left on Emory, left on Brickyard at BojanglesHours: Mon-Fri 10am - 5pm • Sat 10am - 1pm

*This ad must be present at time of sale. One per customer. 10% cash not included on coins or diamonds.

aturing Knox GExchange

fea

When you sell your gold.* 10% EXTRA CASH

Powell Vacuum • 7225 Clinton Hwy • Powell • 938-5070

Bring in your old, worn-out vacuum and trade it in for $50-$100 on a new RICCAR vacuum!

BUY 2 GET1 FREE!

Vacuum bags &

beltsExpires

April 30, 2013

All RICCAR purchases include:• FREE bags (6ct) for your Riccar• FREE cleaning and service for the fi rst year of ownership• 2-5 yr. WARRANTIES

Great savings on vacuum cleaners from RICCAR, the vacuum that is

made with American pride!

Spring Cleaning TimeIS HERE!

Now is your chance to own a RICCAR with its legendary cleaning performance and

durability.

4521 Doris Circle, Knoxville, TN 37918 • Monday - Friday 8am - 6pm

Tires Alignments BrakesMaintenance Services – WE DO IT ALL!

AC DELCO Batteries $7999

Family-Owned • Honest • Reliable

ProCare

Installed. Most vehicles. Expires 5/6/13

185-65R14 ........... $69195-60R15 ........... $69205-65R15 ........... $79225-60R16 ........... $79 235-75R15 ........... $89

Like us on Facebook

Includes tire rotation and vehicle inspection.

$49.99 value. Most vehicles.Expires 5/6/13

WHEELALIGNMENT$10 Off

Reg. $59.99Most vehiclesExpires 5/6/13

WITH TIRE PURCHASE

$20 Off

BRAKESPECIAL

$8999Reg. $119.99

Per Axle. Most vehiclesExpires 5/6/13

We will beat anyone’s tire prices, guaranteed.

865-377-4069

TIRE SPECIALS

INSTALLED

11222

OIL CHANGESPECIAL$2199

Ray Varner

2026 N. Charles Seivers Blvd. • 2026 N. Charles Seivers Blvd. • Clinton, TN 37716Clinton, TN 37716457-0704 or 1-800-579-4561457-0704 or 1-800-579-4561

www.rayvarner.comwww.rayvarner.com

SPECIALS OF THE WEEK! SAVE $$$

Dan Varner

Price includes $399 dock fee. Plus tax, tag & title WAC. Dealer retains all rebates. Restrictions may apply. See dealer for details. Prices good through next week.

Travis Varner

'13 Ford Taurus SEL, Leather, moonroof, low miles! R1321 ............$24,950'12 Ford Flex LTD, Loaded, factory warranty!!! R1319 ......................$27,550'12 Ford E-350 XLT, 15 passenger van, 1 owner, like new! R1324 .....$22,450'12 Ford Fiesta S, Auto, power windows & locks, 40 mpg!! R1361 .....$12,990

Powell’s baseball team has rebounded from a sub-.500 start to a 14-9 overall record. In recent games, Powell beat Soddy-Daisy 7-2, lost to Pi-geon Forge 9-5 and defeated CAK at Lindsey Nelson Sta-dium.

In district competition, the Panthers beat Central twice, 11-0 and 9-0.

“We put the ball in play,” said head coach Jay Scarbro. “Our pitchers threw strikes and didn’t give anyone free passes. We did a really good job of throwing strike one and attacking their hitters.”

The Central series con-cluded Powell’s district sea-son. The Panthers fi nished 6-4 in district play and will fi nish either third or fourth in the district standings de-pending on how things play

Cory Chitwood

April wraps regular season

out with other teams.Up next for Powell is a

game against Karns Tuesday, April 23. It will not, however, count as a district game. The Panthers will also be playing in a tournament at West High School on Friday and Satur-day. After that, it’s just the district tournament.

“We hope to be playing our best going into May 3,” said Scarbro.

Softball: The Panthers are currently sitting at 13-

By Ruth WhiteLook out wrestling

world: a powerhouse is on the rise and his name is Mason Shields.

In March, Shields par-ticipated in the Amateur Athletic Association (AAU) National Tournament for youth wrestling in King-sport and won the national title in the Tot Division for the 35-pound weight class.

This month, he com-peted in the NUWAY Na-tional Championship in Battle Creek, Mich., where he went up against kids a year older than him in the AAU tournament. Mason won the championship and received a trophy as long as his torso.

Mason wrestles with Praetorian Wrestling in Knoxville and has done ad-ditional training with the Knoxville Youth Wrestling Club.

On route to the AAU nationals he placed fi rst in the regional tournament and second in the state tournament. His brother Matthew, 8, also won the regional tournament in the Midget Division (50-pound weight class). His wrestling partner Mason Jakob, 6, won fi rst

Mason Shields at the NU-

WAY National Champion-

ship tournament earlier this

month. Photo submitted

Shields shines at wrestling nationals

in the Bantam Division (40-pound weight class) at regionals and came in third at state.

Mason is in kindergar-ten at Brickey-McCloud Elementary and is in his second season of wres-tling. His primary coach is Phillip Maxwell and he has also been training with Rick Jakob and Junior Hernandez.

By Libby Morgan“Tom Parkhill is a premier

iris hybridizer,” says Ruth En-nenga, secretary of the East Tennessee Iris Society.

Well said.Parkhill’s fi nest iris yet,

“Chief John Jolly,” is in the running for the most presti-gious award in the world of American irises.

He’s been cross-pollinating irises for over 60 years and, since 1956, has been devel-oping his craft in his sunny backyard just up the road from Ijams Nature Center in Island Home.

Raising irises

Tom Parkhill with his lifelong passion, irises. The variety here is

Poorman. Photo by Libby Morgan

Chief John Jolly, Parkhill’s

award-winning iris hybrid,

and many of his other variet-

ies, are the result of six de-

cades of cross-pollination. Photo submitted

13 overall, but a 7-4 district record should give Powell a decent seed in the district tournament.

Despite some tough losses, the Panthers have a shown a few promising signs going into postseason play. Powell took on Karns last Tuesday, one of the district’s top teams this year, and held the game to a 6-7 loss. The day prior, Powell beat Hardin Valley by an impressive score of 12-2. Powell also beat Campbell County 12-2 the previous week.

Soccer: The PHS boys soccer team has posted one of its best records in recent years and is looking to secure a third-place fi nish in the dis-trict standings.

The Panthers are 4-3-1 overall, coming off two big

wins against the Emory Road rivals. Powell beat Karns 3-2 and Halls 4-0.

The Panthers lost just 1-0 to the district’s top team and local powerhouse Oak Ridge. The Powell soccer attitude is the brightest it’s been in a while.

“We are excited about how well we have been playing as a young squad and see-ing how we have been able to compete in big games,” said head coach Kevin Van Pelt.

Powell has one district game remaining, against Clinton, Tuesday at PHS. A win over the Dragons would lock up a third-place fi nish for Powell, just behind Har-din Valley and Oak Ridge. After that it’s on to the dis-trict tournament, where the Panthers hope to make a real impact.

“(We’re) preparing for our best postseason performance yet,” said Van Pelt.

Iris show and sale is SaturdayLocal iris enthusiasts, members of the East Tennessee

Iris Society, will host their annual show and sale Saturday, April 27, at Knoxville Center Mall near the Trout Court.

Show chair Geraldine Couturier of the Strawberry Plains area says anyone is welcome to bring cut iris by 8:30 a.m. for the competition, but the entry must be a named variety. Other unnamed irises can be displayed, and iris experts will be on hand.

Arrangements featuring irises is also a category in the show. There are several categories, including “novice,” for those who have never won an award before for their ar-rangements. These also must be brought to the show early before the judging begins.

After the judging, iris starts, called rhizomes, will be for sale from 1-4 p.m.

“We raise a right smart amount of money for the soci-ety at this sale, but we don’t charge near enough for the varieties. Some of them sell for $40 other places. We usu-ally charge four dollars. I think we’re going to go up to fi ve this year,” says Tom Parkhill.

The iris society will also be selling at Bloomsdays at the UT Gardens May 11 and 12. Chief John Jolly has often

made the cut in the American Iris Society’s judging with an Honorable Mention in 2005, the Award of Merit in 2008, and the Wister Medal last year.

Parkhill’s gorgeous variety with buff yellow “standards,” the top part of the bloom, and reddish-brown-edged white “falls,” the petals below, with “rays” and “dots,” is his best yet, and, according to com-ments he says he has received from AIS panel members, one of the three best ever in the history of the 93-year-old na-tional organization.

It is eligible for consider-ation for three years for the coveted Dykes Award, a dis-tinction given only once each year. Parkhill will fi nd out in August whether Chief John Jolly takes him to the pinnacle this time.

Parkhill carefully cross-pollinates between two prom-ising varieties, collects and

grows the seeds, and waits to see the distinctive bloom.

“I’ve got one out there now that’s a goner. I’m not impressed with it at all,” says Parkhill. “I’m gonna dig it up and make room for some-thing else.

“I won’t have to think of a name for it. It’s diffi cult to come up with names when there are two to three thou-sand iris variety names regis-tered every year.

“My other award winner is Miah Jane. It’s all one color, known as a ‘self,’ and is a soft vibrant blue.”

Miah Jane won the AIS Award of Merit in 2007.

Parkhill sure isn’t in it for the money.

“I sell about enough to pay for about half of my new stock,” he says, referring to purchases of other promising varieties from other hybridiz-ers like him.

Geraldine Couturier, longtime daylily and iris grower, says society mem-bers will buy the newest and the best varieties, grow them, and then share with other members, gaining new color, form and size traits to put into the mix.

The East Tennessee Iris Society is open to new mem-bers, says Ennenga, and

meets most non-winter sec-ond Mondays at Bethel United Methodist Church at 5955 W. Emory Road. Call Ruth En-nenga at 803-6338 to confi rm the date and time if you’d like to join them.

Irises are just now coming into bloom here in Knoxville.

“Bloom time is the absolute worst time to transplant irises from the plant’s point of view,

but it’s also when people can see the blooms and it makes them want to buy them,” says Parkhill. “So I’ll be digging a lot next week.”

Parkhill and his fellow iris society members will be at their annual show and sale next Saturday at Knoxville Center Mall and at Blooms-days at the UT Gardens on May 11-12.

Open to members & non-membersOpen to children up to the age of 18

Practices start May 28 Morning & evening practice times available

2-week FREE TRIAL period

at Beaver Brook Country Club

For more details call Leslie 679-1548

Sign ups Sunday, April 28 • 2pm - 4pm at Beaver Brook Country Club

A-12 • APRIL 22, 2013 • POWELL Shopper news

Your guide

toReal Estate!Real Estate!Real Estate!

(865) 992-TEAM (8326)

4378 Suite A, Maynardville Highway • Maynardville

MARK MAHONEY(865) 244-8870

370 Old Leadmine Bend Rd., Sharps Chapel – Super clean, partially furnished. 16x72 mobile home with add ons. Lrg fenced lot w/2 carports & 2 storage bldgs. Big sunroom w/wood stove & cooling. Walk to boat launch & Helms Ferry on Norris Lake. $68,700. MLS#838550

Panoramic Dr, Lot 25, Maynardville – New development with paved roads. Great views of beautiful Norris Lake on this nice, corner lot. Lot perks for 3BRs. Owner/Agent $34,900. MLS#746651

Panoramic Dr, Lot 63, Maynardville – New development with paved roads. Great views of lake and mountains. Has city water available. Owner/Agent $19,000. MLS#818626

(865) 992-TEAM (8326)4378 Suite A, Maynardville Highway • Maynardville

ROGER PEPPER Realtor(865) 216-6753 • [email protected]

159 Summers, Maynardville. All THREE CABINS! – FAMILY RETREAT or live in one and possibly rent the other two. 3 homes in beautiful mountain setting. Walk back in time along the tranquil stone bordered pathways between the cabins. Includes a

16x24 workshop and 2 strg sheds. 2/10 mile to Norris Lake and 4/10 mile to Hickory Star Marina. Log cabin has FP & hdwd fl rs. All homes have H&A. Lots of extras.

MLS#834279. $249,000.

(865) 992-TEAM (8326)4378 Suite A, Maynardville Highway • Maynardville

Eddie & Debbie Perry Realtors(865) 414-9782 • [email protected]

www.fi rstteamonlake.com• [email protected]

[email protected]

Top 10 Reasons To Use A Real Estate Agent 1. Professional representation and protection

of your best interests 2. Access to qualifi ed buyers 3. Marketing tools to sell your home 4. Less aggravation and hassle 5. Protection from legal pitfalls 6. Exposure to Multiple Listing Service 7. Knowledge of legal documents 8. Negotiation of top dollar for your home 9. Ability to close the transaction10. Peace of mind and time-saving

Call today for your free

Market Analysis!

Rhonda Vineyard218-1117 It’s the experience that counts!

HALLS (Joshua) – Well-maintained rancher with unfi n-ished basement. 1850 SF of open fl oor plan. 3BR/2BA, eat-in kitchen + DR, breakfast bar, gas FP, hdwd and tile fl ooring, cathedral ceilings, lots of cabinets, pantry, master BA w/whirlpool tub & W/I shower. Covered back porch. MLS#833703. $219,900

Ftn. City (Greencrest) – Charming home. Great Fountain City location. Over 1000 SF, 3BR/1.5BA, hard-woods, updated kitchen & baths. Stone fi replace, big, screened-in porch, large yard. MLS#840766. $114,900

Halls (Lazy Creek) – Well-maintained end unit. Over 1000 SF with 2BR/2BA, laminate fl ooring in the living areas. Gas, log fi re-place, galley kitchen, walk-in closets, back porch is fenced and covered. MLS#837067. $69,900

Beverly McMahan & Leah Edmondson 922-4400

8018 Phyllis Dr. - Benjamin Knob S/D. All brick & like new! Level, landscaped corner lot. $25,000 updates include: New dimensional roof, BA vanities w/granite tops, toilets, fl oor coverings, water heater, gar door & opener, security system, front storm door, dishwasher, handicap accessible master bath. $133,900.

8206 EWING RD. HUD #481-289690 POWELL – Brick tri-level on lg wooded lot. 3BR/2.5BA. Needs some work. Now accepting bids from owner/occu-pants. FHA fi nancing w/insured escrow. $100 down incentive, 203K eligible. Equal Housing Oppor-tunity. Call Beverly to place a bid. $133,000.

8942 NORRIS FREEWAY HUD # 481-203701 BACK ON THE MARKET! 6BR/3 full BA. 1.52 acres. Converted gar still has gar door. Vinyl replacement windows. FHA fi nancing w/insured escrow, 203K eligible, Equal Housing Opportunity. Call Bev-erly to place a bid, $130,000.

4540 Hooks Ln. - Harrell Place. Just listed and just like new. All brick rancher w/level fenced lot, New laminated fl rs in LR & BRs, ceramic tile in kit & BA, vaulted ceiling in LR, new french door in DR, Whirlpool tub w/ceramic tile surround in mstr BA. $134,900. Call Leah 679-3905

It’s the experience that counts!

Fountain City! $169,900! Mins. to UT & Downtown! Full bsmt, possible sep living quarters w/additional kit, full BA &

BR in bsmt, over 2,600 SF, 3 or 4 BRs & bonus rm, 2 full BAs, sep LR & fam rm, Library, formal DR, updated kit, brick FP in bsmt, covered deck & covered patio, fenced backyard, gorgeous lot. Conv. to new Virginia College, bus-line, schools & shopping. MLS# 836935

DeborahHill-Hobby207-5587

www.deborahhillhobby.com

Halls/Powell! $229,900! Just listed! You can be happy here! Immaculate home w/over 2,300 SF, 3BRs + bonus

rm, 2.5BAs, huge LR, formal DR w/hdwd, eat-in kit w/hdwd & work island, screened porch & BBQ deck. Heated/cooled offi ce or workshop off oversized 2-car gar. Gorgeous lot w/mature landscaping on cul-de-sac street. MLS# 838236

Cumberland Estates! $145,900! ESTATE SALE! Brick ranch on level lot w/sunroom, approx 1,600 SF, 3BR/2BA w/

whirlpool tub & sep shower in mstr BA, lg great rm & DR, kit w/white cabinets, refrig, sun rm or den, all hdwd fl oors except for BRs & sun rm, stg building, 2-car gar. MLS # 839037

Fountain City! $99,900! Approx 1,480 SF, 3 or 4 BRs, 2 full, updated BAs, LR/DR combo, eat-in kit, hdwd fl oors thru-out,

carpet in den or 4th BR, cedar lined closets, laundry rm, covered patio, level, fenced backyard, huge lot! Conv to Ftn City Lake & Park, schools, shopping, Ktrans bus line & library. MLS # 840589

Rhonda Lyles368-5150

[email protected]

HOME ON 1.5 ACRES – Great piece of property in a conv location of West Knoxville. Near schools, hos-pitals, shopping, restaurants. FP in grt room, updated kitchen & BAs. Loft upstairs in addition. Screened-in porch. Only county taxes. MLS#839020. $149,900

IN THE HEART OF FTN. CITY & GREAT BUSINESS – If you ever wanted to own your own shop, this is it! It’s a beautiful beauty salon today, but could be a perfect offi ce or shop of any kind. 76’ of road frontage. Very close to very busy intersection. This commercial bldg is a must see. MLS#836403. $249,900

OPEN FLOOR PLAN – Huge great room, dec gas FP, french door to patio open to lrg eat-in kit. Bay win-dow area, lrg laundry, extra offi ce area or mother-in-law suite on main. Formal DR, lrg master has spa tub, dbl vanity, W/I closet. All good size BRs w/lrg closets. Very lrg bonus & extra strg. On cul-de-sac. Sec sys, custom blinds, sealant pkg on gar. Conv located to schools & parks. Mins to Turkey Creek. A must see. MLS#834967. $239,900

29.50 ACRE HOMESITE – Mins from downtown Clinton. Nestled on a wooded, private area. 5BRs, master on main, 3.5BAs. Completely up-dated w/hdwd fl oors, granite counter tops, S/S appl, lots of beautiful win-dows overlooking in-grnd pool. Lots of timber & wildlife. Less than 30 min from marinas & Norris Lake. A must see! MLS#830934. $459,0 00

EXCELLENT CONDITION! – Open fl r plan. 3BR, master on main. 1-level ranch. Split BRs, 2-car gar, level lot, low maintenance S/D. Nice, private deck overlooks pasture. 100% fi -nancing for USDA/Rural Devel quali-fi ed buyer. MLS#840544. $119,000

TW0-STORY – 3BR, craftsman-style. Beautifully painted, open fl oor plan. Cherry cabs, extra strg. Conv located to schools, shopping, Smoky Mtns or downtown Knoxville. 100% fi nancing for qualifi ed USDA/Rural development buyer. MLS#840539. $139,000

www.KnoxHomeSite.com

Outreach Program (BHOP) at UT Medical Center Cancer Institute to increase awareness of the life-saving benefi ts of early detection of breast cancer. It is the 11th year that the program has received funding from the Avon Foundation for Women to support its work.

■ David Korda was appointed vice presi-dent of the architecture and engi-neering fi rm Barge Waggoner Sumner and Cannon Inc. at the annual meeting on

April 13. Korda has 16 years of experience providing structural engineering design for diverse construction projects, such as industrial power-generation facilities, commercial and retail developments and retaining structures. Korda holds both master’s and bachelor’s degrees in civil engineering from UT.

POWELL Shopper news • APRIL 22, 2013 • A-13 business

Home of the $595 CARPORTEveryday Low Price!

938-93007729 Clinton Hwy.Powell, TN 37849

[email protected] • www.byc1.net

Established 1995

Direct Cremation, $1,188.24

(865)947-42423511 W. Emory Rd., Powell, TN

(Powell Place Center)

DDoogwwwoooooddd Crremmaatiioonnn,, LLLLLCCCC..C

Basic Services $480 • Crematory Fee $250Transfer Of Remains $395 • County Permit $25

Alternative Container $35 • Tax On Container $3.24

Legal Document Express922-7467 • [email protected]

Deeds and Title Reports

Last Will and Testament

Power of Attorney

Living Will

Probate of Estates

Agreed Divorce

• Fast, reliable service

• 30+ years experience

• Reasonable rates

• Supervised and reviewed by

licensed attorney

• Attorney representation

provided as needed

We make house calls!

CallCall

Honest, Reliable Service Since 1971

925-3700

SSoutheastoutheastTERMITE AND PEST CONTROL

Termites?

Spa days make moms happy.

Tennova.com859-7900

Gift certificates available.

Windsor Gardens is an assisted living community designed for seniors who need some level of assistance in order to experience an enriched & fulfi lled life. Our community offers older adults personalized assistance & health care in a quality residential setting.

Come…let us treatyou like royalty.

North Knoxville’s Premier Assisted Living Community

(865) 688-48405611 CENTRAL AVE. PIKE

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED AT EXIT 108 (MERCHANTS RD.) OFF I-75

• Locally Ownedand Operated

• Three Apartment Sizes• Three Levels of Care• 24 hr Nursing Onsite• Medication Management• Activities Program• VA Benefi ts for Veterans

& Widows

I-75 North

Merchants

Cen

tral

Ave

. CedarTexaco

Applebee’sComfort Inn

BPDays Inn

WindsorGardens

WindsorGardensASSISTED LIVING

www.windsorgardensllc.com

Clark joins Clayton Motor Co.Doug Clark of Powell has joined Clayton

Motor Co. at 4500 Clinton Highway. He has been in car sales since 1988, working for many years with Burgin Dodge which oper-ated out of this location.

“‘Buy here, pay here’ is our slogan for late model used cars,” Clark said. The dealership is open 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturdays. Info: 686-7760 or 850-1540. Doug Clark

By Alvin NanceThrough the hard work of

KCDC em-ployees, the city of Knox-ville and our partner or-ganizations, many of Knoxville’s n e i g h b o r -hoods are exper ienc-

ing transformations, and during National Community Development Week April 1-5, we gathered to celebrate this progress.

On April 1, KCDC joined with the city of Knoxville to celebrate a project that has been a priority for both agen-cies for many years: Five Points Revitalization. We in-vited approximately 50 elect-ed offi cials and community leaders to Paul Hogue Park in the heart of Five Points to share our vision of a revital-ized neighborhood.

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero and our KCDC board of commissioners chair Cul-ver Schmid detailed what has already been accomplished and our plans for future de-velopment.

“Cities are great if they have great neighborhoods,” said Mayor Rogero. “The city of Knoxville remains com-mitted to the revitalization of

Nance

News from Knoxville’s CommunityDevelopment Corporation (KCDC)

Offi cials inspect the Five Points development . Photo submitted

Progress for Five Points Skinner elected to

Blount boardPowell resident Lisa Hood Skinner is vice chair of

the Blount Chamber Foundation.Greg Wilson, Maryville regional

president of First Tennessee Bank, is the chair, while Michelle Hankes, president/CEO United Way of Blount County, is secretary/treasurer.

Skinner is a senior vice president of Ackermann PR. She and husband Dr. Steve Skinner co-own with Dr. Tinsley Youmans the Knoxville Animal Clinic, 5312 Homberg Drive in Bearden.

Skinner

Celebrating 86 years of gardening The Noweta Garden Club recently attended the 86th annual meeting and convention of the Tennessee Federation of Garden Clubs. At the event are Lana McMullen, Carole Whited, Majorie Gardner, (seated) Jane Jennings and Noweta Club president Peggy Jones, Carolyn Keck, Debbie Johnson and Regena Richardson. Club members are pictured next to Jones’ education exhibits on Native Plants in the Smokies. Photo by Ruth White

■ Randy Fields of Messer Construc-tion Co. has been appointed by Knox-ville City Council to the Public Assembly Facilities board of directors.

Council member Finbarr Saun-ders said, “Randy will bring a fresh perspective to the board. It was my honor to appoint him to this position.”

■ Uno Express Pizza has opened at McGhee Tyson Airport. It is located just past the security checkpoint across from Quiznos Subs. Uno will off er a variety of personal pan pizzas as well as breakfast and dinner calzones. It will be open for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

■ Tracy Hicks has been named

general manager of the Hilton Garden Inn Knoxville/University. Currently under con-struction, the 7-story prop-erty will include a full-service restaurant

and bar, along with conference space. It’s adjacent to UT in the Cumberland Avenue district. Hicks has worked in hospital-ity management, including a stint as general manager of the historic General Morgan Inn and Conference Center in Green-eville and 10 years of service at the Martha Washington Inn in Abingdon, Va.

■ The Avon Breast Health Outreach Program has awarded a $60,000 one-year grant to the Breast Health

Randy Fields

David Korda

Tracy Hicks

Five Points and is partnering with KCDC in this effort.”

“With the help of our community partners, we have made signifi cant steps towards breathing new life into Five Points,” Schmid said. “We have a vision for its future as a vibrant part of Knoxville.”

Much has already been done in this area to improve affordable housing and to identify community needs and resources available to residents.

■ In 2011, KCDC opened the Residences at Eastport, an 85-unit, LEED Platinum-certifi ed senior housing de-

velopment in Five Points. ■ Senior housing duplexes

were also constructed in 2011 adding 20 housing units to the community.

■ In August, 183 units of Walter P. Taylor were demol-ished as part of a fi rst phase to replace older public hous-ing in Five Points with new units.

As part of the second phase of redevelopment in the area, KCDC is currently constructing 20 family-style, in-fi ll housing units in vacant or blighted lots that will fi t in with the architectural char-acter of the neighborhood.

At the Five Points celebra-

tion event, we cut the ribbon on a brand new single-family residence on the corner of Chestnut and Wilson streets. KCDC also recently opened up a new duplex that has already been leased to two families, and plans call for a total of three duplexes, two single-family residences and two six-plex residences, which will be managed by KCDC.

Our residents want more for their families and their neighborhood. Through our strategic plan and help from our residents and commu-nity partners, we will create a better future for Five Points.

Griffi th honored at KCDCCraig Griffi th was honored recently for 10 years of service

on the Knoxville’s Community Development Corporation’s (KCDC) board of commission-ers as he completed his term in March.

“Craig has been a pillar of the KCDC board for the past 10 years, displaying expert guidance and judgment,” said Alvin Nance, KCDC executive director and CEO.

Griffi th was fi rst appointed to the KCDC board in 2003 by then-Mayor Victor Ashe. He was reappointed by both Mayor Bill Haslam and Mayor Madeline Rogero.

Griffi th previously served as the public affairs director for the city of Knoxville and deputy to the mayor from 2000 to 2003.

Premier Surgical hires Matt WestMatthew West has joined Premier Surgical Associates

as chief operating officer. He previouslywas director of Carolinas Gastroenterol-ogy Centers in North Carolina.

West earned his master’s degree inhealth care administration and an MBAfrom the University of Alabama at Bir-mingham with his undergraduate workat Furman.

He will oversee operations at PremierSurgical’s five physician practices andcentral billing office, working for CEO

Kevin Burris. He is originally from Knoxville. He andhis wife enjoy tennis, biking and traveling.

West

Griffi th

BUSINESS NOTES

Catch up with all your favorite columnists every Monday at www.ShopperNewsNow.com

A-14 • APRIL 22, 2013 • POWELL Shopper news

THROUGH SUNDAY, APRIL 28

Dogwood Trails and Open Gardens, open all day. Dogwood Trails: Chapman Highway, Farragut, Fountain City, Holston Hills, Lakemoor Hills, Se-quoyah Hills, Westmoreland. Garden Byways: Deane Hill, Halls/Timberline, Island Home, Morningside and North Hills. Several residential and public gardens and camera sites also. Info: www.dogwoodarts.com.

THROUGH SATURDAY, MAY 11

Union County High School Greenhouse open, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday though Friday; 9 a.m.-noon Saturday. Large assortment of vegetable plants, bedding plants, container arrangements. Info: Linda Baxter, 992-0180.

TO SATURDAY, JUNE 1

Registration open for American Museum of Sci-ence and Energy’s Science Explorer Camp for rising 5th (10 years old), 6th and 7th graders. Info: www.amse.org.

THURSDAYS THROUGH NOVEMBER

New Harvest Park Farmers Market, 4775 New Harvest Lane, 3-6 p.m. Venders include local farmers, crafters and food trucks. Info: http://www.knoxcounty.org/farmersmarket/index.php.

MONDAY, APRIL 22

High Tower & Hoop Growing Techniques: “How to extend your spring and fall growing seasons,” 5 p.m., Seven Springs Nursery, 1474 Hwy 61 E; “Farm-ers Markets” and the farmers perspective, 6 p.m. and a demonstration on “Preparation of Produce for Public Tasting,” 6:30 p.m., UT Extension Offi ce, 3925 May-nardville Highway. Info: 992-8038.

TUESDAY, APRIL 23

Healthy Choices, a plant-based free cooking class, to help prevent/reverse some cancers, diabetes, heart disease and obesity, 6 p.m., North Knoxville 7th-Day Adventist Church fellowship hall, 6530 Fountain City Road. Space limited. To register: 314-8204 or www.KnoxvilleInstep.com.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24

Central High/Halls High baseball game at Tommy Schumpert Park, 5:30 p.m. All gate receipts will benefi t the Chris Newsom Memorial Scholarship Fund.

THURSDAY, APRIL 25

Open Door Book Review, 1 p.m., Fountain City Branch Library, 5300 Stanton Road. Speaker: Dr. John Romeiser will review “Beachhead Don,” a collection writings by WWII correspondent Don Whitehead.

FRIDAY, APRIL 26

“Bride’s Night Out,” North Knoxville’s Best

Bridal Show, 6-9 p.m., Beaver Brook Country Club, 6800 Beaver Brook Road. Free for Brides-to-Be and one guest; additional guests, $5. Info: http://www.north-knoxbridal.com/ or on facebook https://www.facebook.com/#!/events/486877824686635/?fref=ts.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 26-28

Baseball tournament, rec teams only – T-ball and 6U coach pitch through 8U-14U – Halls Community Park. Info: 992-5504 or [email protected].

SATURDAY, APRIL 27

Country Music Show and Spaghetti Dinner, 4-8 p.m., Powell Masonic Lodge #582, 7700 Fersner Road. All invited.

Auction with concessions and vendors, 3 p.m., Son Light Baptist Church, 6494 Sonlight Way. Proceeds help support the Guatemala Mission Team. Info: Mi-chelle Kitts, 387-8269.

Fountain City Lions Club annual pancake break-fast, 8-11 a.m. in the Lions Club Building at Fountain City Park.

Biscuit and Gravy breakfast fundraiser, 8-11 a.m., hosted by Luttrell Seniors, Union County Senior Center. $5 per person. Everyone welcome. Info: Linda, 216-1943.

Heiskell Elementary School reunion, 1-5 p.m., old school building, now the Heiskell United Methodist Church and Community Center. There are no charges; donations appreciated. Bring pictures and memories. Info: Bobbie Kennedy, 257-1283, or Janice White, 548-0326.

Historic Homes of Knoxville bus tours: 9 a.m.-noon; 1-4 p.m. Reservations required. Info/tickets: 523-7521 or www.KnoxTIX.com.

Spring 2013 Iris Show and Plant Sale, “Volun-teer Pride,” presented by the East Tennessee Iris Society (ETIS), an affi liate of the American Iris Society. Sale, 9 a.m. until all plants are sold; show, 1-4 p.m. Knoxville Center mall. Free admission.

Gospel singing 7:30 p.m., Judy’s Barn, behind Big Ridge Elementary School off Hickory Valley Road in Union County, featuring area gospel singers. Free admission. Info: Jim Wyrick, 254-0820.

SUNDAY, APRIL 28

Book signing by Dr. Mike Smith, Senior Pastor of Central Baptist Church of Fountain City, for his new book, “Mount and Mountain, Volume 2: A Reverend and a Rabbi Talk About the Sermon on the Mount,” 1-3 p.m. in the church media center.

The Singing Crossroads in concert, 6 p.m., Union Missionary Baptist Church, Ailor Gap Road. Ev-eryone welcome. Info: 924-7750.

TUESDAY, APRIL 30

International dinner to celebrate World Friend-ship Day, hosted by the Friendship Force club, 6:30 p.m., Palisades Clubhouse, 501 Rain Forest Road off Gleason Road. Wear an outfi t representative of another country and bring an international dish to share. Info: 693-0322.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1

Free concert by the Singing Seniors, a 60-voice choir, 10:30 a.m., Powell UMC, 323 West Emory Road. The public is invited.

Deadline to enter samples of handmade crafts to participate in the New Member Jurying Process at the Appalachian Arts Craft Center, 2716 Andersonville Highway 61 in Norris. Jurying packet available at the center. Info: 494-9854 or www.appalachianarts.net.

THURSDAY AND FRIDAY, MAY 2-3

Spring Dance Showcase hosted by Knox County Schools, 7 p.m., Performing Arts Auditorium at Aus-tin-East Magnet High School, 2800 Martin L. King Jr.

Ave. Admission is $5. All welcome. Pre-show din-ner, 6 p.m., for those interested in info about the KCS Performing Arts Magnet program. Dinner reserva-tions: Olivia Riggins, 594-3792, by Monday, April 29.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, MAY 3-4

Rummage sale, starting 8 a.m., New Hope Mission-ary Baptist Church, 7115 Tipton Lane off of East Beaver Creek Drive. Follow signs from Central Avenue Pike.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, MAY 3-5

Baseball tournament, open/travel teams – T-ball and 6U coach pitch; 8U-14U – Halls Community Park. Info: 992-5504 or [email protected]

SATURDAY, MAY 4

Caring for the Caregivers, a resource fair for senior adults and caregivers of all ages, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Wallace Memorial Baptist Church, 701 Merchant Drive. Speakers: Bob Coyne and Blake McCoy. Several exhibi-tors. Free and open to the community. Info: 688-4343, www.wmbc.net.

Free women’s self-defense class, noon, Over-drive Krav Maga & Fitness, 7631 Clinton Highway. Info: www.overdrivema.com or 362-5562.

Gospel singing 7:30 p.m., Judy’s Barn, behind Big Ridge Elementary School off Hickory Valley Road in Union County, featuring area gospel singers. Free admission. Info: Jim Wyrick, 254-0820.

Churchwide rummage sale, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m., Fountain City UMC, 212 Hotel Ave. Rain or shine. $3 Brown Bag-a-Bargain, noon-2 p.m.

Spring Craft and Vendor Sale, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Norwood Baptist Church, 1725 Wilson Road.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY, MAY 4-5

“Skirmish on the Holston,” Civil War Living History and Reenactment weekend, Historic Ramsey House, 2614 Thorngrove Pike; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. both days. Admission: $5, adults and children 13 and up; children 12 and under free. Info: Sandy, 546-0745 or [email protected].

TUESDAYS, MAY 7, 14, 21, 28

“Girl Talk” classes, for mothers/caregivers and daughters ages 9-12 years, sponsored by the Univer-sity of Tennessee Extension and Maynardville Public Library, 6-8 p.m., Maynardville Public Library, 296 Main St. Info/to register: Rebecca Hughes, 992-8038.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 8

Rook card games, 10 a.m., Luttrell Seniors; Union County Senior Center.

FRIDAY, MAY 10

Painting demonstration by Brett Weaver, nation-ally recognized plein-air painter and featured artist for Artists on Location, 7 p.m., Knoxville Museum of Art. Info: www.knoxart.org.

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, MAY 10-11

Benefi t sale, Cornerstone Baptist Church, 2500 Mynatt Road in Halls. Info: 687-9012. Leave a message.

SATURDAY, MAY 11

Fountain City Art Center Garden Party/Lun-cheon/Benefi t, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Ginger and Bill Bax-ter’s Gardens, 3901 Sam Cooper Lane. Reserved seats: $35. Info/reservations: 357-2787; [email protected]; 213 Hotel Ave.

Send items to [email protected]

ShoppernewseVents

POWELL SERVICE GUIDE

To place an ad call

922-4136

ROOFINGRE-ROOFS • REPAIRS • METAL

WINDOWS • SIDING24 Hr. Emergency Service

Will work with your insurance companyInsured, licensed & bonded • Locally owned & operated

Member BBB since 2000FREE ESTIMATES!

524-5888exthomesolutions.com

We buy all homes661-8105 or [email protected]

CASH for your

@ iill

CashFast $$$Fast $$$

for your

HOUSEHOUSE!!

ALTERATIONS BY FAITH

For Men, Women & ChildrenCustom-tailored clothes for ladies of all sizes PLUS kids!

Call Faith Koker • 938-1041

Blank’s Tree Work

All types of Tree Care & Stump Removal

FULLY INSUREDFREE ESTIMATES 924-7536

Will beat written estimatesw/comparable credentials.

BREEDEN’S TREE SERVICE

Over 30 yrs. experienceTrimming, removal, stump grinding, brush

chipper, aerial bucket truck.Licensed & insured • Free estimates!

219-9505

DAVID HELTON PLUMBING CO.

All Types of Residential & Commercial PlumbingMASTER PLUMBER

40 Years Experience � Licensed & Bonded

922-8728 � 257-3193

Lawns starting at $25

18 YRS EXP • FREE ESTCall Bryan 659-7890

LAWN CARE: Mowing • Seeding • Fert

LANDSCAPING: ADDITIONS Mulching • Clean-up • Maint

EXCEL LAWN & LANDSCAPING

CERAMIC TILEINSTALLATIONFloors, Walls & Repairs33yrs. experience, excellent work

Call John: 938-3328

MOWINGCommercial/Residential, Licensed/Insured

Serving North Knoxville 20 years

938-9848 • 924-4168

Green Feet Lawn Care

FREE ESTIMATESLIFETIME

EXPERIENCE

HankinsHankinsTree Service

Owner Operator Roger Hankins

497-3797

Pruning • LoggingBush Hogging

Stump RemovalInsured

HAROLD’SGUTTER SERVICEWill clean front & back.

$20 and up. Quality work guaranteed.288-0556

GGUUUUGUUUUHill Lawn Care

& MoreMowing • Weedeating

Hedge/Bush Trimming • BushhoggingPlowing • Discing • Mulching

Bobcat Work • Topsoil • Fill Dirt

Jeff Hill389-2017 • 388-4346 • 922-0530

Lawncare &Mowing ServicesSpring clean-ups, mulch, over-seeding, mowing, blowing & trimming. FREE ESTIMATES

809-1301

MOBILE MOWER REPAIRDon’t wait weeks for a repair. Make an appointment today! Briggs & Stratton Certifi ed.

Service on the spot

We come to your home

659-1893

ESTATE SALE

April 26 & 278am - 6pm

Rain or shine!140 Valley Lane, Claxton. Across from the Bull Run steam plant. Furn, W/D, ‘08 PT Cruiser, Jim

Beam bottles, vintage soda bot-tles, exotic hand fans, framed

pics, everyday household items, antique tools, dishes & more!

SPROLES DESIGNDESIGN& CONSTRUCTION

Concept to CompletionRepairs thru Additions

Garages • Roofi ng • DecksSiding • Painting

Wood/Tile/Vinyl Floors

938-4848 or 363-4848

Experienced in carpentry, drywall,

painting & plumbing

Honest & Dependable

Reasonable rates.

References available

Small jobs welcome

Dick Kerr 947-1445

POWELL Shopper news • APRIL 22, 2013 • A-15

NEWS FROM WORKOUT ANYTIME

By Shana Raley-Lusk

Before he was the owner of Workout Anytime in Powell, John Heifner spent 20 years as a registered nurse with a grow-ing career in the health indus-try. During his time working in the emergency room and the in-tensive care unit, John came to realize that most of the health problems that he saw in his pa-tients were preventable.

More than just an average gym

Silver Sneakers Participating

Health Plans in TN: ■ AARP MedicareComplete® by United Healthcare

■ AARP Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan

■ Amerigroup

■ BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee

■ HealthSpring

■ Humana

■ UnitedHealthcare®

■ Windsor Health Plan John Heifner, owner of Workout Anytime in Powell. Photos submitted

“Diabetes and cardiovascular disease are rampant, but they are preventable,” John said. “Cancer is a huge killer, but 60 to 70 percent of it is preventable through a healthy lifestyle.”

Now, John’s mission is to help pass that message along to others through Workout Any-time, where membership is rea-s o n a b l y p r i c e d and fl exi-ble enough to fi t most any bud-get and lifestyle. Membership costs only 15 dollars per month and requires no long-term con-tracts. This approach truly sets Workout Anytime apart from other local competitors.

“This gives us a vested inter-est in the success of our mem-bers. We want them to see re-sults and keep coming back,” John says.

John’s philosophy for a healthy life is quite simple. He approaches health from a three-part perspective: mind, body, and spirit.

“If even one of these is out of whack, it will impact the other two areas and prevent you from living life abundantly,” John says.

As a Christian establish-ment, Workout Anytime ap-proaches health from a Biblical standpoint.

“This is my ministry now,” says John. “The

body truly is a tem-ple, and it is im-portant to take care

of it. I want to pass that on to others.”

Now in its third year, Work-out Anytime now has 2,500 members and a strong presence in the Powell community.

“We are the number one franchise in this system as far as measurable results,” says John.

In two weeks, the fi tness club will begin offering the Sil-ver Sneakers program for local seniors.

“We have spent a lot of time getting this program as an op-tion for our community,” says John. “We are so excited to fi -nally be able to offer it here.”

Through the program, six in-surance carriers will make no-cost memberships at Workout Anytime available for seniors as a preventative measure for good overall health.

“This will be a huge benefi t for the senior community,” says John. “These members will get a key card, just like all of our other members.”

With 24-hour access and lo-

cations throughout the South-east that all members can uti-lize, Workout Anytime makes staying in good health as con-venient as possible.

Seniors interested in tak-ing part in the Silver Sneakers program can visit the Powell location to sign up and get ad-ditional information.

“This is an excellent pro-gram and we are so pleased to be able to offer it to the seniors here in Powell,” Johns says.

Info: www.workoutanytimepowell.com, or fi nd them on Facebook.

OUR GREAT AMENITIES WILL KEEP YOU ENERGIZED & MOTIVATED! Extensive Cardio Area

Nutrition & Weight Loss Programs

Complete Weight Area

Personal Training

Athletic Training

Convenient 24 Hour Access

Month-to-Month Membership

Over 30 Boot Camp Sessions

Available per Week

Tanning & Infared Massage Therapy

Come Celebrate Our 1st Year Anniversary!

John Heifner, Owner

OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY, 365 DAYS A YEAR!

3547 W. EMORY RD. POWELL, TN865-441-4471

Join online at workoutanytimepowell.com

Save over 50 % on enrollment

by liking us on Facebook and then following the “Join Now”

directions on our website: Workoutanytimepowell.com.

If you are covered by United Healthcare Insurance you may be eligible for a

free gym membership! Please call for more information.

Infrared

Independently Owned & Operated

by bringing this ad when you

join. A savings of $50.00 and the

FIRST MONTH FREE!

POWELL HAS SILVER SNEAKERS PROGRAM!Finally!

A-16 • APRIL 22, 2013 • POWELL Shopper news

Items and Prices are specifically intended to apply locally

where issue originates. No sales to dealers or competitors.

Quantity rights reserved. 2013 K-VA-T Food Stores, Inc.

Food City is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

SALE DATESSun., April 21 -

Sat., April 27, 2013

Recognizing...ADMINISTRATIVEPROFESSIONALS DAY!

Wednesday,April 24th

ThanksBouquetEach

599

899

©AG

C, LL

C

40% Off all Gibson greeting cards

Visit the carddepartment today!

Selected Varieties

Russell StoverBoxed Candy12 Oz.

With Card

599

Selected Varieties

Brookside DarkChocolate7 Oz.

With Card

2/600

Administrative Professionals Day

Lunch for 2SpecialIncludes 2 Hot Bar Meals& 2 16 Oz. Drinks

With Card

1000

1 Mylar and 5 Latex

Thank You Balloon BouquetEach

Yellow Triple Rose Bud Vase

Each

1299

Food City Fresh

SplitFryer BreastFamily Pack, Per Lb.

With Card 99¢

Delicious!

Red, RipeStrawberries16 Oz.

With Card 2/500

100

Food City Fresh, 75% Lean 25% Fat

GroundBeefPer Lb. for 3 Lbs. or More

With Card 249

Genuine

SweetVidalia OnionsPer Lb.

With Card 69¢

93

S Varieties,Pepsi Products

elected 12 Pack, 12 Oz. Cans

BUY MORE!SAVEMORE!

3/$12FOR

Less than 2 are $4.99 each.

2/$9FOR

Selected Varieties

Simply Juice1.75 Lt.

2/600With

Card

Selected Varieties

Edy’sIce Cream

48 Oz.

SAVE AT LEAST 5.99 ON TWO

With

Card

Frozen, Ultimate or

DiGiorno Stuffed Crust Pizza

24.1-36.8 Oz.

599With

Card

Selected Varieties

Nabisco Ritz Crackers

9.5-16 Oz.

SAVE AT LEAST 3.99 ON TWO

With

Card

Selected Varieties

All SportBody Quencher

8 Pk., 20 Oz. Btls.

299With

Card

Kern’s

Old FashionedBread

20 Oz.

SAVE AT LEAST 2.59 ON TWO With

Card

Selected Varieties

Betty CrockerHamburger Helper

4.7-8.7 Oz.

SAVE AT LEAST 1.99 ON TWO

With

Card

Selected Varieties

GainLaundry Detergent

50 Oz.

499With

Card

LOW PRICE LOCKDOWN

LOW PRICE LOCKDOWN

Check us on Pinterest!Find us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter! View us on YouTube!foodcity.com

ReCO