Photography Undergraduate Mentoring Program (PUMP) Handbook

download Photography Undergraduate Mentoring Program (PUMP) Handbook

of 8

  • date post

    04-Apr-2016
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    218
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

description

A peer mentoring handbook for photography majors at UCF Daytona Beach.

Transcript of Photography Undergraduate Mentoring Program (PUMP) Handbook

  • MENTOR STUDENT HANDBOOK2014 - 2015

    UCF Daytona BeachCollege of Arts & Humanities

    U N I V E R S I T Y O F C E N T R A L F L O R I D A R E G I O N A L C A M P U S E S

  • 2014-2015 PHOTOGRAPHY UNDERGRADUATE MENTORING PROGRAM HANDBOOK

    -2-

    You help students achieve the potential within them that is hidden to others and perhaps even to the students themselves.

    You share stories with students about your own educational career and the way you overcame obstacles similar to theirs.

    You help students overcome their fear of a professor and help them to ask questions in a class or visit the professor during office hours.

    You show a student how you mastered time management to do well in your classes.

    You listen to a student describe a problem and explore resources at the university to deal with the problem.

    You help a new student understand a particularly tough bureaucratic rule or procedure and you explain it in a way that the student is willing to come back to you to learn about other difficult regulations.

    You help a new student understand how to use resources at the university, such as the Student Academic Resource Center (SARC online) or Student Services.

    You are Serving as a Peer Mentor When

    (Adapted: Rosen College of Hospitality Management, n.d.)

  • 2014-2015 PHOTOGRAPHY UNDERGRADUATE MENTORING PROGRAM HANDBOOK UCF DAYTONA BEACH

    www.ucfdaytona.com

    -3-

    I. HELPING YOUR MENTEE

    Set GoalsYou may help your mentee set goals by helping them understand a mnemonic device (memory strategy) for recalling the components of a well-designed goal. A SMART goal is one that is:

    Specific The goal is clearly stated and indicates what the student will do to achieve it.

    Example: I will achieve at least a B average this semester by spending 25 hours per week on my coursework outside of class.

    Measurable The goal is important and progress toward reaching the goal can be measured or tracked.

    Example: I will earn at least a B average this term and I will assess my progress toward this goal by keeping track of all grades earned in my courses.

    Actionable Identifies the actions or behaviors the student will engage in to

    reach the goal. Example: I will achieve at least a B average this term by (a) attending

    all classes, (b) taking detailed notes in all classes, (c) completing all assignments before the due dates, and (d) studying for all major exams.

    Realistic The goal is attainable and the student is aware of the time, effort, and skill it will take to attain it, as well as obstacles to be encountered along the way.

    Example: Achieving a B average this term will be a realistic goal because my courses are manageable and I only work part-time.

    Time-specific The goal has a deadline and a timeline that includes a sequence of short-range, mid-range, and long-range steps.

    Example: To achieve at least a B average this term, first I will obtain the information I need to learn by taking detailed notes in all classes and assigned readings (short-range step). Second, I will study my notes and readings before major exams (mid-range step). Third, on the day before my exams, I will hold a final review session for all information previously studied, and will review feedback after my exams are returned to improve future performance.

    Stay Motivated Strategies that you may use to help students stay motivated toward achieving their goals.

    Visualize reaching long-range goal. Picture the goals that really matter by creating mental images of future success.

    Put goals in writing. Students are more likely to remain aware of written

    (Adapted: A Handbook for Peer Mentors: College Tips & Success Strategies to Share with Students, Metz, Cuseo & Thompson, 2013)

  • 2014-2015 PHOTOGRAPHY UNDERGRADUATE MENTORING PROGRAM HANDBOOK

    -4-

    goals and likely to pursue them. Written goals serve as a contract that holds them accountable to their commitments.

    Keep a record of progress. A regular record of progress increases motivation because it provides feedback about whether or not students are on track and moving toward their goals.

    Reward yourself for reaching milestones. Students need to reward themselves for achieving the short and mid-range goals along the path to the ultimate goal.

    Use peers as a social resource for achieving goals. Harness the power of social support by surrounding yourself with peers who are committed to achieving their educational goals.

    Manage Time and TasksEffective task- and time-management involve three key processes:

    1. Itemizing listing key tasks that need to be completed toward a specific goal.2. Prioritizing beginning tasks in order of importance.3. Scheduling deciding when tasks are to be started and completed.

    Encourage students to rank tasks in order of importance:One strategy for prioritizing tasks is to divide tasks into: A, B, and C lists. The A list is for critical tasks-what must be done now. The B list is for important tasks-what should be done soon. Finally, the C list is for optional tasks what could or might be done later.

    Stay Motivated (continued)

    II. HELP MENTEE IDENTIFY CAMPUS RESOURCES

    Make use of campus resources by connecting students to the UCF Daytona Beach Resource Guide: http://issuu.com/ucfrcamarket/docs/992772_resource_guides-daytona_beach?e=0/2455885

    Connect with Key Members of the Campus Community

    Research shows that students who become socially connected with other members of the campus community are more likely to remain in college and

    (Adapted: A Handbook for Peer Mentors: College Tips & Success Strategies to Share with Students, Metz, Cuseo & Thompson, 2013)

  • 2014-2015 PHOTOGRAPHY UNDERGRADUATE MENTORING PROGRAM HANDBOOK UCF DAYTONA BEACH

    www.ucfdaytona.com

    -5-

    complete their degree. Tips for helping students make connections with the campus community, include the following:

    1. Connect with the campus administrator and meet Dr. Linda Thacker.2. Connect with Student Services and campus leaders who can direct you

    to key community members and potential job opportunities.3. Connect with peers who commute to campus from the same area.

    (Encourage students from same geographic area to carpool)4. Join a student organization, club, or volunteer service group, whose

    members may share the same personal interests or career goals as you do.

    5. Connect with motivated classmates with whom you could work together in teams to take notes, complete reading assignments, and study for exams.

    6. Connect with faculty by visiting faculty during office hours, talking briefly with them after class, or communicating with faculty by email.

    7. Connect with the Student Academic Resource Center for academic support: http://sarc.sdes.ucf.edu

    8. Connect with an academic advisor to discuss and develop future educational plans.

    9. Connect with a college librarian to get assistance on an assigned research project.

    Connect Students with Faculty

    Research shows that students who interact with faculty are more likely to remain in college and get more out of their college experience. As a peer mentor, you can help students connect with faculty:

    Encourage students to take advantage of faculty office hours. Share your personal experiences with students, including how you

    approached faculty and asked questions. Encourage students to attend faculty events such as scholarly

    presentations on campus. Advise students to participate in activities, such as field trips. Invite faculty as guest speakers for mentor-mentee group activity.

    (Adapted: A Handbook for Peer Mentors: College Tips & Success Strategies to Share with Students, Metz, Cuseo & Thompson, 2013)

    Helping and Connecting Students

    Helps You!

  • 2014-2015 PHOTOGRAPHY UNDERGRADUATE MENTORING PROGRAM HANDBOOK

    -6-

    III. DEVELOP MENTOR-MENTEE RELATIONSHIP

    Form Supportive Relationship with Mentee

    Periodically invite your mentee to an informal get-together at places that are comfortable and favorable to conversation. For your first get-together, you may suggest a brief meeting (no longer than an hour) so that it does not appear as though you are asking for a major commitment. You may go overtime if the conversation is going well.

    At your first meeting, learn about your mentees background, interests, experiences and goals. Keep track of what you learned in this first meeting and build on it to guide your future conversations.

    Encourage Communication with Mentee

    Communication and listening skills are important to the mentor-mentee relationship.

    Passive Listening is hearing the words with our ears, but not thinking about those words with our mind because the mind is partially somewhere else.

    Active Listening is a process that is critical in all mentoring roles. This process can be enhanced by: a) listening with focused attention on the students message; b) listing to both verbal and nonverbal (body language) messages; and c) listening with concern (interest and empathy).

    Faculty are more likely to remember students, who have approached them, and who show interest in their course material. Faculty are more likely to write letters of recommendation for students who they know.

    Connect Students with Academic Advisors

    Advisors not only assist students with class scheduling and graduation requirements. They also are a great source of information and can connect you to university resources. A few examples of support that an advisor can provide include:

    Assist students with choosing or changing