PERSONAL NARRATIVE)WRITING PROJECT) complete anarrative) writing) piece,) specifically) a)...

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  • PERSONAL  NARRATIVE  WRITING  PROJECT   COMPLETE  UNIT  PLAN  WITH  LESSONS  

    Intended  for  use  in  a  seventh  grade  English  Language  Arts  classroom  

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Copyright  ©  2009  Thomas  Kawel.  All  rights  reserved  in  all  media.  

    thomas.kawel@gmail.com  •  http://teach.albion.edu.thomaskawel    

  • Personal  Narrative  Writing  Project   1  

     

    PREFACE   Following  is  a  complete  unit,  including  all  reasonable  materials,  preparing  seventh  grade  students  to  successfully   complete   a   narrative   writing   piece,   specifically   a   personal   narrative   memoir,   as   outlined   in   the   Michigan   Department   of   Education   GLCE   v12.05,   W.GN.07.01.   Based   upon   a   novel   by   Avi,   The   True   Confessions   of   Charlotte  Doyle,   the  unit  does   rely  on   specific   aspects  of  his  piece;  because  of   its   structure,  however,   the  unit   should  be  quite  easily  adapted  to  suit  different  needs  and  different  texts  —  assuming  the  chosen  novel  is,  in  fact,   a  narrative  piece  written  as  a  memoir.  Strong  emphasis  is  placed  on  VOICE  and  PERSONAL  STYLE,  the  proper  use  of   QUOTATION  MARKS  and  the  conventions  of  WRITTEN  DIALOGUE,  and  the  use  of   IMAGERY  and  SENSORY  LANGUAGE.   PERSPECTIVE  WRITING,  POINT  OF  VIEW,  and  ELEMENTS  OF  PLOT  are  also  touched  on  considerably.  

    Motivating  many  students  to  develop  a  concrete  idea  to  write  on  can  be  terribly  difficult,  especially  if  the  teacher   is  working   in   a   secluded   community   that  does  not   see  many   children   leave   even   the   city   limits.   Stressing   the   high,  or  even  priceless,   value   that  each  of   the   students  has   in   the  classroom,   school,   and  global   community   is   absolutely  necessary.    One  cannot  assume  that  each  student  understands  this  fact  up  front  and  the  promotion  of   self-­‐worth   in   the   English   classroom   can   only   increase   a   student’s   achievement.   Through   the   construction   of   strong   relationships   with   the   students,   an   English   teacher   can   assist   greatly   with   focusing   the   students’   imaginations  and  the  development  of  truly  impressive  work.  

    Employing   the  use  of  pre-­‐writing   tools   is  helpful   and   structuring   the  writing  around   two  drafts,   a   few  days  of   workshop,  and  a  final  period  of  typing  the  final  copy  was  practiced  successfully  during  the  first  run  of  this  unit.  I   suggest  conferencing  privately  with  each  student  during  the  development  stage;  it  will  help  you  understand  each   student’s  goals  and  it  will  help  the  student  to  dig  deeply  and  focus  their  piece  on  a  single  event.  

    While  the  unit  seems  collected  and  neat  in  its  presentation,  here,  the  actual  practice  can  become  an  incredibly   clustered  series  of  events.  Depending  on  each  situation,  certain  parts  of  this  unit  may  need  to  receive  more  time   than  what   is   provided   for   in   these   pages.  One  may   need   to   spend   considerable   time  working  with   quotation   marks  and  dialogue   structure.  Keep   in  mind,  however,   that   the  greatest   focus   should  always  be  placed  on   the   development   of   a   strong   idea   and   the   skills   employed   during   drafting   and   writers’   workshops.   This   unit   is   purposed  around  strengthening  students’  IDEAS  and  VOICE  in  their  writing.  

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Personal  Narrative  Writing  Project   2  

     

    DRIVING  QUESTION   What  is  my  PERSONAL  NARRATIVE  MEMOIR  and  how  can  I  write  a  successful  piece?  

      SUB-­‐DRIVING  QUESTIONS  

    • What  is  a  PERSONAL  NARRATIVE  MEMOIR?   • What  are  PLOT  ELEMENTS  and  how  can  I  use  them  to  strengthen  my  writing?   • How  do  I  determine  the  proper  placement  of  QUOTATION  MARKS  in  my  writing?   • What  is  DIALOGUE?   • How  do  I  properly  use  QUOTATION  MARKS  in  order  to  show  DIALOGUE  in  my  writing?   • What  is  IMAGERY  and  why  is  it  important  to  my  writing?   • What  does  PERSPECTIVE  mean  and  what  does  it  mean  to  write  from  a  POINT  OF  VIEW?   • “I  don’t  have  anything  exciting  that  ever  happened  to  me!  What  am  I  supposed  to  write  about?”   • What  are  CHARACTER  TRAITS  and  how  do  writers  use  them  to  add  depth  to  their  characters?  

      MICHIGAN  EDUCATIONAL  TECHNOLOGY   STANDARDS  FOR  STUDENTS  2009   By  the  end  of  the  8th  grade,  students  will…  

    • 6-­‐8.CI.1:   apply  common  software   features   to  enhance  communication  with  an  audience  and   to   support   creativity  

    • 6-­‐8.CT.2:  evaluate  available  digital  resources  and  select  the  most  appropriate  application  to  accomplish  a   specific  task  

    • 6-­‐8.CT.4:  describe  strategies  for  solving  routine  hardware  and  software  problems   • 6-­‐8.TC.1:  identify  file  formats  for  a  variety  of  applications   • 6-­‐8.CT.2:  use  a  variety  of  technology  tools  to  maximize  the  accuracy  of  technology-­‐produced  materials  

       

  • Personal  Narrative  Writing  Project   3  

     

    GRADE  LEVEL  CURRICULUM  EXPECTATIONS   Students  will…  

    • R.WS.07.02:   use   structural,   syntactic,   and   semantic   analysis   to   recognize   unfamiliar   words   in   context   including  idioms,  analogies,  metaphors,  similes,  knowledge  of  rots  and  affixes,  major  word  chunks/rimes,   and  syllabication.  

    • R.WS.07.06:   fluently   read   beginning   grade-­‐level   text   and   increasingly   demanding   texts   as   the   year   proceeds.  

    • R.NT.07.01:  identify  how  the  tensions  among  characters,  communities,  themes,  and  issues  are  related  to   their   own  experiences   in   classic,  multicultural,   and   contemporary   literature   recognized   for  quality   and   literary  merit.  

    • R.NT.07.02:   analyze   the   structure,   elements,   style,   and   purpose   of   narrative   genre   including   mystery,   poetry,  memoir,  drama,  myths,  and  legends.  

    • R.NT.07.03:   analyze   the   role   of   antagonists,   protagonists,   internal   and   external   conflicts,   and   abstract   themes.  

    • R.NT.07.04:  analyze  author’s  craft   including  the  use  of  theme,  antagonists,  protagonists,  overstatement,   understatement,  and  exaggeration.  

    • R.CM.07.02:  retell  through  concise  summarization  grade-­‐level  narrative  and  informational  text.   • R.AT.07.01:  be  enthusiastic  about  reading  and  do  substantial  reading  and  writing  on  their  own.   • W.GN.07.01:  write  a  cohesive  narrative  piece  such  as  a  memoir,  drama,  legend,  mystery,  poet