Overview Present the past, present & future of VoIP. Focus: –Technology...

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Technology Overview What is VoIP –The “Real Time” transmission of voice signals using the Internet Protocol (IP) over the public Internet or private data network. Process of Data Transfer –Voice signal is “packetized” –Voice becomes data: dismantled > compressed > transferred > decompressed > assembled

Transcript of Overview Present the past, present & future of VoIP. Focus: –Technology...

Overview Present the past, present & future of VoIP. Focus: Technology Cultural Factors Economic Factors Regulatory Factors Technology Overview What is VoIP The Real Time transmission of voice signals using the Internet Protocol (IP) over the public Internet or private data network. Process of Data Transfer Voice signal is packetized Voice becomes data: dismantled > compressed > transferred > decompressed > assembled The Past Three fundamental technologies that need to exist: Telephone Internet/Intranet (public or private) Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) The history of the Telephone The history of the Internet TCP/IP Invented by Dr. Vint Cerf in 1972 Defines the form of net data packets and how they travel to their destinations The Past (continued) VoIP started in 1995 by VocalTech, Inc. in Israel Worked from computer to computer In 1998 the first PC to phone calls took place Supervening Necessity No regular telephone service Developed to circumvent legacy networks monopoly Just want to avoid a long distance bill. The Present The Present: Business adoption and cultural impact Economic & Financial impact Regulation Business and adoption of VoIP Lower the cost of communicating Converge telephone infrastructure with existing data network Cultural Impact? Call center jobs moving away from the U.S. 250,000 jobs moved since 2001 Need to support products Operating Hours Outsourced staff is highly educated The Present (continued) Economics and Finances Four groups are affected by VoIP U.S. Federal Government FCC has taken the regulatory right from the individual states The technological nature of VoIP - distributed network This affects local tax revenue AT&T sends part of their calls over the Internet The Present (continued) Legacy Networks Verizon has lost 9 million phone lines in the northeast (16% of total) AT&Ts revenue is down 18% since 2001 Bells have lost 28 million phone lines since 2001 Resemble the railroads WW2 - move from train to automobile and airplane The Present (continued) Cable companies (the ultimate ITSP) Pressure from Satellite - need to expand to stay competitive Already have a wired connection to the home Can offer bundled services Cable television Hi-speed Internet Service Telephone Service Businesses who adopt the technology (#4) Benefits are there for large companies / not for small COs. Most say that the real benefit is the enhanced data network. The Present (continued) More on the regulatory role of the U.S. federal government Take the regulation away from the states ITSPs must pay 911 emergency assistance tax ITSP are worried that they will be regulated like legacy networks The CALEA (Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act) (1994) Electronic surveillance for telecommunication service providers Does this Act (and the 1996 telecommunications Act) open the door for the U.S. government to regulate the Internet? The Future Increased number of users ,000 users (in the U.S.) ,000,000 users (in the U.S.) Expand to other platforms Mobile market and PDAs Transform the traditional cell phone Use of WiFi networks One number - Persistent Personal Profile It may be possible to connect with one universal number ( , phone, fax, etc.) No longer dependent on a fixed geographic location Converging Media Data, Voice, Images, Video Conclusion