Outline of Presentation International Overview of Islamic Finance. Product Tree of Islamic...

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Transcript of Outline of Presentation International Overview of Islamic Finance. Product Tree of Islamic...

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  • Outline of Presentation International Overview of Islamic Finance. Product Tree of Islamic Microfinance Partnership Based Modes in Islamic Microfinance Trade Based Modes in Islamic Microfinance Rental Based Modes in Islamic Microfinance MicroTakaful MicroTakaful Products for Islamic Microfinance Institutions. Presented by : Prof. Dr. Khawaja Amjad Saeed Principal: Hailey Collage of Banking & Finance The University of Punjab. Director Research: AlHuda: Centre of Islamic Banking & Economics
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  • International Overview of Islamic Finance
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  • Islamic products and services offered by Financial Institutions around the world. United States: 20 - Al Manzil Financial Services - American Finance House - Failaka Investments - HSBC - Ameen Housing Cooperative Germany:4 - Bank Sepah - Commerz Bank - Deutsche Bank Switzerlan d: 6 UK: 26 - HSBC Amanah Finance - Al Baraka International Ltd - Takafol UK Ltd - The Halal Mutual Investment Company - J Aron & Co Ltd (Goldman Sachs) Bahrain: 26 - Bahrain Islamic Bank - Al Baraka - ABC Islamic Bank - CitiIslamic Investment Bank Malaysia: 49 2 - Pure Islamic Banks (Bank Islam, Bank Muamalat) Rest - conventional banks Saudi Arabia: 17 - Al Rajhi - SAMBA - Saudi Hollandi - Riyadh Bank UAE: 13 - Dubai Islamic Bank - Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank - HSBC Amanah Qatar: 4 - Qatar Islamic Bank - Qatar International Islamic Kuwait: 9 - Kuwait Finance House Iran: 8 Egypt: 12 - Alwatany Bank of Egypt - Egyptian Saudi Finance Indonesia: 4 Sudan: 9 Pakistan: 21 India: 3 Bangladesh: 9 Turkey: 7 - Faisal Finance Institution - Ihlas Finance House Yemen: 5
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  • International Overview The size of Islamic Financial Industry has reached US$ 300 Bln. and its growing annually @ 15% per anum. 51 countries have Islamic Banking Institutions 27 Muslim countries including Bahrain, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, Brunei and Pakistan 24 non-Muslim countries including USA, UK, Canada, Switzerland, South Africa and Australia
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  • International Overview Leading foreign Banks have opened Islamic Banking windows or subsidiaries such as: Standard Chartered Bank Citibank HSBC ABN AMRO UBS
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  • International Overview In Feb 1999, Dow Jones introduced the Dow Jones Islamic Market Index (DJIM) of 600 companies world wide whose business complies with Islamic Shariah laws At present there are more than 105 Islamic Funds operational through out the world with a total fund base of over USD 3.50 billion
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  • International Overview Governments of Bahrain,Malaysia and now Pakistan have issued Islamic Bonds (Sukuk) in order to facilitate Islamic Banks in managing their liquidity. Issuance of these bonds has also paved the way for Shariah compliant Government borrowings
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  • International Overview Institutions like Accounting and Auditing Organization for Islamic Financial Institutions (AAOIFI) and Islamic Finance Services Board (IFSB) have been formed. These institutions are playing a key role in setting up and standardizing Shariah, Financial and Accounting standards for Islamic Financial Institutions. Due to these collective efforts Islamic banking is now recognized by IMF, World Bank and Basel Committee.
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  • Takaful Operators The number of Takaful operators worldwide is now estimated at: 108 Takaful companies 6 Retakaful companies In 35 Countries. Average growth rate higher than conventional insurance companies (around 25%). NonMuslims increasingly opting for Takaful products for commercial benefits.
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  • Takaful Geographical Spread South& East Asia :51% Middle East :32% Africa:12% Europe, USA & Others:5%
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  • Islamic Microfinance
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  • PRODUCT TREE Islamic Modes of Microfinance Trade Based Modes Partnership Based Modes Rental Based Modes Musharaka Mudaraba Murabaha Salam Istisna Ijarah Diminishing Musharaka
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  • Partnership Based Modes
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  • MUSHARAKA Characteristics All parties share in the capital All parties share profits as well as losses Profits are distributed as per agreed ratio Loss is borne by the parties as per capital ratio Every partner is agent of other
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  • MUSHARAKA PARTNER APARTNER B VENTURE Rs.1000 PROFIT Rs. 100 LOSS Rs.100 Rs. 60 Rs. 40 Rs. 50 May be in any agreed ratio Must be according to capital ratio
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  • MUSHARAKA PARTNER APARTNER B VENTURE Rs.2000Rs.3000 PROFIT Rs. 100 LOSS Rs.100 Rs. 50 Rs. 40Rs. 60 May be in any agreed ratio Must be according to capital ratio
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  • MUDARABA One partner (Rab al Mal) contributes capital and the other (Mudarib) contributes his skills or services to the venture Venture may for a fixed period or purpose Both share profit in pre-agreed ratio Loss is borne by Rab al Mal only, Mudarib loses his services
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  • MUDARABA RABBUL MALMUDARIB VENTURE SERVICES CAPITAL PROFIT LOSS 50 % ALL MONETORY LOSSLOSS OF SERVICES
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  • MUDARABA RABBUL MALMUDARIB VENTURE SERVICES CAPITAL PROFIT LOSS 40 %60 % ALL MONETORY LOSSLOSS OF SERVICES
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  • Trade Based Modes
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  • Basic Rules of Bai (Trade Base Mode ) Existence of Product/Commodity Ownership of Product/Commodity Possession of Product/Commodity Unconditional basis Product have value/Price.
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  • Basic Rules of Bai (Trade Base Mode ) Bai on Such product which is permissible in Islam. Product Must be Identify, clear with all demanding Qualities. Not based on any incident, struggle etc Price must be clearly identified.
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  • Bai There are many type of Bais but usually following are using in Islamic Microfinance. Murabahah Salam Istisna
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  • Murabahah Murabaha is a particular kind of sale where the seller discloses its cost and profit charged thereon. The price in this sale can be both on spot and deferred.
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  • Murabahah It is a contract wherein the institution, upon request by the customer, purchases a asset from the third party usually a supplier/vendor and resells the same to the customer either against immediate payment or on a deferred payment basis.
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  • Murabahah Basically, its not a mode of financing but a source to avoid interest Dealing Its not a type of loan, but a deal (Bai) Murabahah can be used as source of financing when client needs funds to purchase any product/Machinery etc.
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  • Murabahah Product Must be bought from third party for avoid buy back transaction Roll over is not Valid in Murabahah If actual cost can not be identified then Murabahah deal not possible.
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  • Salam Pay 100% amount in Advance. Product must be quantified, identified and Measured with quality. Date of delivery, Time, Place must be mentioned clearly in advance. Salam is not valid for a specific farm/land/garden.
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  • Istisna Not necessary to pay the 100% amount in advance Like Bai salam. Price must be decided on beginning of the contract. Qualities, features of that product must be clearly identified.
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  • Rental Based Modes
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  • IJARAH (LEASING) Ijarah is to offer for a consideration the usufruct of a thing of value from which benefit can be derived without consumption, while retaining the ownership of the leased assets and assuming risks pertaining thereto.
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  • IJARAH (LEASING) - The leased commodity remains in the ownership of the lessor and only its usufruct is transferred to the lessee. - Any thing which cannot be used without consuming the same cannot be leased out like money, edibles, fuel, etc. - Only such assets which are owned by the lessor can be leased out except that a sub-lease is effected by the lessee with the express permission of the lessor.
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  • IJARAH ( LEASING ) - During the entire term of the lease, the lessor must retain title to the assets, and bear all risks and rewards pertaining to ownership. - If any damage or loss is caused to the leased assets due to the fault or negligence of the lessee, the consequences thereof shall be borne by the lessee.
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  • IJARAH ( LEASING ) - The lessee is also responsible for all risks and consequences in relation to third party liability, arising from or incidental to operation or use of the leased assets. - The insurance of the leased asset should be in the name of lessor and the cost of such insurance borne by him. - A lease can be terminated before expiry of the term of the lease but only with the mutual consent of the parties.
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  • IJARAH ( LEASING ) - Either party can make a unilateral promise to buy/sell the assets upon expiry of the term of lease. - Alternatively, the lessor may make a promise to gift the asset to the lessee upon termination of the lease.
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  • IJARAH (LEASING) - The amount of rental must be agreed in advance - Contract of lease will be considered terminated if the leased asset ceases to give the service for which it was rent