Museum of Mexican American Civil Rights Welcome to the Museum of Mexican American Civil Rights...

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Transcript of Museum of Mexican American Civil Rights Welcome to the Museum of Mexican American Civil Rights...

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Slide 2 Museum of Mexican American Civil Rights Slide 3 Welcome to the Museum of Mexican American Civil Rights Museum Curator Hernandez v. Texas Chicano Movement Exit Mendez vs. Westminster. UFW Slide 4 Museum Entrance To Entrance United Farm workers (UFW) Slide 5 Room 3 Chicano Movement To Entrance Slide 6 Room 4 Mendez vs. Westminster Entrance Slide 7 Room 2 Hernandez v. Texas To Entrance Slide 8 Cesar Chavez Csar Chavez was born in Arizona. His family were farm workers. He attended 65 school because his parents could not find a permanent job. Csar Chavez was tired and knew something had to be done so he made the NFWA and demanded higher pay. His boycott and hunger strike helped a lot of farm workers. Return to Room Image acquired at: http://www.scott.k12.va.us/martha2/longhouses.htm Slide 9 NFW Flag The NFW flag was made by three people Csar Chvez, Richard and Manuel Chvez. They copied the eagle from the flag of Mexico. Csar Chvez wanted the eagle to be easy to reproduce. He picked the colors red for sacrifice white for hope and black for struggles of farm workers. Most of the farm workers were from Mexico so they understood the symbol that was easily understood by Mexicans. Return to Room Image acquired at: http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/prehistory/settlements /regions/northeast.html Slide 10 UFW March Most UFW (united farm workers) marches were in California. The last march with Csar Chvez was on April 29 1993. More than 50,000 mourner (a person who arenas a funereal) came to honor him. This march was the largest march of any leader. Return to Room Image acquired at: http://www.mayflowerhistory.com/History/indians5.php Slide 11 Chicano Movement http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=playe r_detailpage&v=-llwNYwTaHw http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-llwNYwTaHw Return to Room Image acquired at: http://gonewengland.about.com/library/blplimoth9.htm Slide 12 Mendez Conflict On September 1943 Sylvia Mndez and his to brothers went with her Aunt to enroll at 17 th street school in Westminster. Also she two cousins. Sylvia and her two brothers were denied at that school because they were dark skin and had a Mexican last name. But there cousins were accepted because they were lighter skin and had some French names. Sylvia Mndez had to go to a school ten blocks away. Sylvias parents sued the school. After that another family sued the school Brown Vs. Bore of Education. The Mndez family moved from Santa Ana to Westminster. Return to Room Image acquired at: http://www.culturecorner.org/Nov-19-05.html Slide 13 The Court Case On March 2, 1945, Mendez v. Westminster went to court. On March 18, 1946, Judge Paul J. McCormick said that the segregation in the school districts where not exiting. This victory helped other people like Brown vs. Board of Education to sue the schools. Return to Room Image acquired at: http://www.desertusa.com/ind1/ind_new/ind21.html Slide 14 Rodolfo Gonzales Return to Room He brought the first Chicano youth conference on march 1969. There a lot of Chicano activists and artists attended. He also known as a founder of the Chicano Movements. He's a boxer, poet and a political activists. He began his life as a fighter in Denver Colorado. Then in1960 he got interested in politics. He attended a poor people march in Washington DC in 1967. He made the Youth Liberation Conference from March 27 through March 31. Later he attended the Chicano Moratorium March and Rally march in Los Angeles. At the march he got arrested. Then he started another group called the La Raza Unida poltica party. They made a march and at the march there were gunfire and explosions. He had heart arrhythmia while he was driving and was paralyzed then he died. Image acquired at: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/14881/14881-h/14881-h.htm Slide 15 What Hernndez did Pete Hernndez was a 21year old kid who was a Mexican America cotton picker. He was drinking at a bar then he lost control so they had to kick him out. When he got to his house he got a gun and came back to the bar and shot Joe Espinosa on September 1951. He was accused of murder. The court didn't want to take his cases so his lawyer got all the Mexican names so he can his case. At the end he got the court cases but was still accused of murder and was on jail for life. Hernandez v. Texas, was a United States Supreme Court case that decided that Mexican Americans and all other races in the United States had equal protection under the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Return to Room Slide 16 Nazario Juarez Guillermo Ramirez Return to Entrance