Module 2 Infant Toddler

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Module 2 Infant Toddler. Responsive Routines, Environments, and Strategies to Support Social Emotional Development. Agenda. I. Introduction and Logistics II. Brief Review of Module 1 III. Careful Observation - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript of Module 2 Infant Toddler

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Module 2 Infant ToddlerResponsive Routines, Environments, and Strategies to Support Social Emotional Development 1

AgendaI. Introduction and LogisticsII. Brief Review of Module 1 III. Careful Observation IV. Responsive Routines and SchedulesV. Responsive EnvironmentsStrategies to Build Emotional LiteracyStrategies to Build Social SkillsWorking in Partnership with FamiliesBringing it All TogetherX. Summary and Action Planning

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Learner ObjectivesParticipants will be able to discuss why it is important to be intentional about supporting social emotional development in infants and toddlers

Participants will be able to describe the importance of caregiving routines and identify strategies for using them to support social emotional development

Participants will be able to identify key ways in which the physical environment can promote social emotional development in infants and toddlers

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Learner Objectives (contd) Participants will begin to examine the environments in which they work and begin to make plans to adapt them more fully to meet the needs of infants and toddlers in their care

Participants will be able to define emotional literacy and describe the kinds of interactions between adults and infant and toddlers that support emotional literacy

Participants will be able to identify strategies for helping to build social skills in infants and toddlers4

istockkphoto.com/GervilleHall5

Istockphoto.com/DamirCudic

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CSEFEL Pyramid Model 77

CSEFEL Definition of Social Emotional Development The term social emotional development refers to the developing capacity of the child from birth through five years of age to form close and secure adult and peer relationships; experience, regulate, and express emotions in socially and culturally appropriate ways; and explore the environment and learn - all in the context of family, community, and culture.

Caregivers promote healthy development by working to support social emotional wellness in all young children, and make every effort to prevent the occurrence or escalation of social emotional problems in children at-risk, identifying and working to remediate problems that surface, and, when necessary, referring children and their families to appropriate services.

Adapted with permission from ZERO TO THREEs definition of infant mental health, 20018

Activity: Key Points from Module 1Social Emotional Development within the Context of RelationshipsTrue/False Review

9Social Emotional Development within the Context of Relationships ReviewSocial Emotional DevelopmentTrueFalse 1) Few infants are born biologically ready for relationships.x Babies are born biologically ready for relationships. 2) Even if a caregiver has had a very difficult upbringing, each new relationship is a clean slate and working with infants and toddlers will bring a caregiver an opportunity to make up for a lifetime of unhappiness.X All of us bring our experiences in prior relationships, particularly with our parent(s), to each new relationship, including those with the babies and toddlers we care for. 3) We may not always know why we do something with young children but there is a right way and a wrong way for children to behave, even babies and toddlers.XBecoming aware of the influence of past and present relationships on our own behavior is an important step in understanding what is driving our response and behavior with individual children

10Social Emotional Development within the Context of Relationships Review (contd)Social Emotional DevelopmentTrueFalse4) Three major elements of social emotional development in infancy include experiencing, expressing and regulating emotions; forming close and secure relationships; and being able to explore and learn. xThree major elements of social emotional development in infancy include experiencing, expressing, and regulating emotions; forming close and secure relationships, and being able to explore and learn.5) Temperament is something that should be eliminated from a child who cannot stop crying.xObserving and understanding the temperament of individual babies can help caregivers know how to be responsive to each one. 6) Attachment is something that a baby either does have or doesnt have, when he meets other people.xAttachment develops as a result of multiple interactions that occur over time between a baby and another person.11Social Emotional Development within the Context of Relationships Review (contd)Social Emotional DevelopmentTrueFalse7) Regardless of a familys cultural beliefs or what a family might prefer, a parent must understand that infants and toddlers are expected to behave according to the care providers values. They also must understand that all rules are put in writing so that busy caregivers do not have to be delayed by talking with parents.xDeveloping strong relationships with families and understanding their cultural beliefs and values give caregivers information they can use to more effectively support social emotional development.8) There are so many influences in childrens lives that the loving messages that a responsive, sensitive caregiver sends to an infant or toddler cannot possibly impact that child for more than a brief time.xWhether positive or negative, the messages that caregivers communicate in many different ways to babies are enormously powerful. 12Activity

Infant-Toddler Observation Tool

istockphoto.com/NatalyaKozyreva

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How Schedules and Routines Support Social Emotional DevelopmentThey are an important part of each day

They meet childrens basic needs

They provide opportunities for learning and development

They help develop a sense of security and control

They provide predictability

They support competence and confidence

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ActivityResponsive Routines Inventory

http://office.microsoft.com/en-au/default.aspx

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Routines - Eating

http://office.microsoft.com/en-au/default.aspx

http://office.microsoft.com/en-au/default.aspx

17Routines - Diapering http://office.microsoft.com/en-au/default.aspx

18Routines Sleeping/Resting http://office.microsoft.com/en-au/default.aspx

19Routines Greetings/Goodbyes Allison Silberber, 2007

20 Arrivals and DeparturesOpportunities to Support Social Emotional DevelopmentAllowing time for hellos and good-byeSpecial goodbye areaFamily photos/objectsTalk about feelingsRitualsGamesBooks (purchased and homemade - Mommy Comes Back)

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Responsive Environments Caregivers are the ones responsible for setting up the physical space, choosing activities and play things and engaging in the interactions that make up the learning experiences for infants and toddlers.

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A Well Designed Infant-Toddler EnvironmentSupports the social emotional needs of infants and toddlers as well as their language, cognitive, and motor development

Encourages responsive care from adults

Supports peer relationships

Is developmentally appropriateage appropriateindividually appropriate culturally appropriate

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EnvironmentsGrossmont College Child Development CenterCourtesy of Harvest Resources

25EnvironmentsWorld Bank Childrens CenterCourtesy of Harvest Resources

26EnvironmentsNew Hampshire Technical Child Development CenterCourtesy of Harvest Resources

27EnvironmentsWorld Bank Childrens CenterCourtesy of Harvest Resources

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Activity

Infant and Toddler Environments Planning Document 29

Emotional Literacy .is the capacity to identify, understand and express emotion in a healthy way.

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Emotional Literacy . is the capacity to recognize, label, and understand feelings in self and others.

Adapted with permission, Cradling Literacy, 2007

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Strategies to Develop Emotional Literacy in Infants and ToddlersUsing the adult/child relationship to expand anindividual childs awareness of his emotions or feelings:Verbally acknowledging and labeling emotions expressed by children in careAssisting infants and toddlers with regulating their emotionsTalking about the fact that feelings can changeUsing questions about feelings to seeif a child can respond32

Strategies to Develop Emotional Literacy in Infants and ToddlersFinding opportunity in the group setting to talk about feelings:Taking advantage of teachable moments when children experience difficulties with peers and need adult support to resolve themStaying close to support children in difficult encounters with other children

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Strategies to Develop Emotional Literacy in Infants and Toddlers2. Group setting (cont.):

Showing positive feelings for both children in conflictLetting children know through your calm approach that conflict is to be expected and that it can be resolved with help Helping children learn to put into words how they think others are feeling and to express empathy for those feelingsEncouraging negotiating so that each child feels that she/he has been heard and that their feelings have been taken into considerationClarifying rulesY35

Strategies to Develop Emotional Literacy in Infants and Toddlers 3. Using enriching language tools:Choosing books, music, finger plays with a rich vocabulary of feeling wordsUsing puppe