MODIGLIANI, Amedeo, Featured Paintings in Detail (2)

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  • MODIGLIANI, Amedeo

    Featured Paintings in Detail

    (2)

  • MODIGLIANI, Amedeo Jeanne Hebuterne In Red Shawl1917Oil on canvas, 81.6 x 129.54 cm Private Collection

  • MODIGLIANI, Amedeo Jeanne Hebuterne In Red Shawl (detail)1917Oil on canvas, 81.6 x 129.54 cm Private Collection

  • MODIGLIANI, Amedeo Jeanne Hebuterne In Red Shawl (detail)1917Oil on canvas, 81.6 x 129.54 cm Private Collection

  • MODIGLIANI, Amedeo Jeanne Hebuterne In Red Shawl (detail)1917Oil on canvas, 81.6 x 129.54 cm Private Collection

  • MODIGLIANI, Amedeo Jeanne Hebuterne In Red Shawl (detail)1917Oil on canvas, 81.6 x 129.54 cm Private Collection

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoThe Jewish Woman1908Oil on canvas, 46 x 55 cm Re Cove Hakone Museum, Kanagawa

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoThe Jewish Woman (detail)1908Oil on canvas, 46 x 55 cm Re Cove Hakone Museum, Kanagawa

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoThe Jewish Woman (detail)1908Oil on canvas, 46 x 55 cm Re Cove Hakone Museum, Kanagawa

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoThe Jewish Woman (detail)1908Oil on canvas, 46 x 55 cm Re Cove Hakone Museum, Kanagawa

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPortrait Of Maude Abrantes1908Oil canvas, 80.6 x 50.1 cmHecht Museum, Haifa

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPortrait Of Maude Abrantes (detail)1908Oil canvas, 80.6 x 50.1 cmHecht Museum, Haifa

    The painting has a haunting quality. The face emerges from blue-lilac and yellow-orange waves, which create an elegant yet unsettling atmosphere. The face is so pale that it seems to be bloodless, the eyes are closed as if in some secret grief, and the over-exaggerated sensuousness of the lips makes them look vicious. The lilac shadows around the eyes and the blue wash on the right eye add to the expression of anxiety and torment, creating a dissonance between suppressed morality and morbid sensuality.

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPortrait Of Maude Abrantes (detail)1908Oil canvas, 80.6 x 50.1 cmHecht Museum, Haifa

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPortrait Of Maude Abrantes (detail)1908Oil canvas, 80.6 x 50.1 cmHecht Museum, Haifa

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPortrait Of Maude Abrantes (detail)1908Oil canvas, 80.6 x 50.1 cmHecht Museum, Haifa

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPaul Guillaume, Novo Pilota1915Oil on cardboard, 105,0 x 75 cmMuse de l'Orangerie, Paris

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPaul Guillaume, Novo Pilota (detail)1915Oil on cardboard, 105,0 x 75 cmMuse de l'Orangerie, Paris

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPaul Guillaume, Novo Pilota (detail)1915Oil on cardboard, 105,0 x 75 cmMuse de l'Orangerie, Paris

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPaul Guillaume, Novo Pilota (detail)1915Oil on cardboard, 105,0 x 75 cmMuse de l'Orangerie, Paris

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPaul Guillaume, Novo Pilota (detail)1915Oil on cardboard, 105,0 x 75 cmMuse de l'Orangerie, Paris

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPaul Guillaume, Novo Pilota (detail)1915Oil on cardboard, 105,0 x 75 cmMuse de l'Orangerie, Paris

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPaul Guillaume, Novo Pilota (detail)1915Oil on cardboard, 105,0 x 75 cmMuse de l'Orangerie, Paris

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPaul Guillaume, Novo Pilota (detail)1915Oil on cardboard, 105,0 x 75 cmMuse de l'Orangerie, Paris

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoSleeping Nude With Arms Open (Red Nude)1917Oil on canvas, 92 x 60 cm Private collection

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoSleeping Nude With Arms Open (Red Nude) (detail)1917Oil on canvas, 92 x 60 cm Private collection

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoSleeping Nude With Arms Open (Red Nude) (detail)1917Oil on canvas, 92 x 60 cm Private collection

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoSleeping Nude With Arms Open (Red Nude) (detail)1917Oil on canvas, 92 x 60 cm Private collection

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoReclining Nude 1917Oil on canvas,60.6 x 92.7 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoReclining Nude (detail)1917Oil on canvas,60.6 x 92.7 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoReclining Nude (detail)1917Oil on canvas,60.6 x 92.7 cm Museum of Modern Art, New York

  • MODIGLIANI, Amedeo , Featured Paintings in Detail (2)

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  • MODIGLIANI, Amedeo Jeanne Hebuterne In Red Shawl

    The subject of this painting was Modiglianis longtime love and partner, Jeanne Hebuterne. The young woman renounced her family and her Roman Catholic background to be with the painter, and the couple soon had one daughter. After two years together, Modigliani died of the tuberculosis from which he suffered the majority of his life. Jeanne, grief-stricken and inconsolable, threw herself out of a fifth-floor window, killing herself and their unborn child. Complete with a long, thin frame and head cocked coyly to the side, the painting is done with such care and simple beauty that you can almost see Jeanne through Modiglianis eyes.

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoReclining Nude

    Modiglianis celebrated series of reclining nudes, begun in 1916, are influenced by Italian Renaissance representations of Venus and other idealized female figures.

    In this painting from 1917, the models stylized, outlined body spans the entire canvas; viewed close-up and from above, her hands and feet disappear outside the frame as her creamy skin glows against the dark red bed or couch.

    Unlike depictions of Venus from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century, in which mythological or allegorical attributes provide a context for the figures nudity, Modigliani provocatively presents his Reclining Nude without any such references, highlighting the figures eroticism.

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoSleeping Nude With Arms Open (Red Nude)

    In 1917, Modigliani held a one-man exhibition in Paris, which was closed within a few hours by the Paris Chief of Police, who considered the nudes shocking and scandalous. This painting was created in 1917, and thus it may be the culprit behind Modiglianis failure, as it was the only exhibition he ever held. Unlike his other more elongated forms, the nude body of the woman is graciously painted with flowing curves and a sensual texture; the mask-like face with eyes full of mystery, and a slight smile to the lips. It is not so scandalous and shocking as it is a celebration of the womans form and her sensual nature.

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPaul Guillaume, Novo Pilota

    Amedeo Modigliani met Paul Guillaume through the poet Max Jacob in 1914. Paul Guillaume was then just starting out as an art dealer, and he rented a studio for Modigliani in Montmartre. In 1915 and 1916 Modigliani produced four portraits of his patron. The portrait in the Muse de lOrangerie was painted at the home of the artists mistress, the British poet, Beatrice Hastings, who also lived in Montmartre.Paul Guillaume, aged just 23, is shown as an elegant young man, sure of himself, looking directly at the viewer. His figure stands out against the red background. His dark suit and hat contrast with his face and his white shirt. The planar rendering of the face and his well-defined features attract the eye, while his left hand is barely sketched.In this portrait Modigliani pays tribute to the young art dealer who was already regarded as the "new helmsman", like a sailor or one of the wise men guided by a star, a patron and visionary supporter of modern art in the years after 1910.

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoPortrait Of Maude Abrantes

    This painting is one of Modiglianis earlier works, and as such has much more of a traditional look. This painting is also indicative of the artists later style in the figures elongated neck and the still, somber emotion on her face. There is also much more detail in her clothing and her face than in Modiglianis later works, which are characterized by simple lines and few discernable features. Early on as an artist, Modigliani preferred life-drawn women subjects, many of whom engaged in love affairs with the handsome painter. One only wonders if this was one such subject.

  • MODIGLIANI, AmedeoThe Jewish Woman

    The Jewesswas the first painting Modigliani sold after settling in Paris in 1906. It was purchased by his friend and patron, Paul Alexandre, who was so taken with the work that he had Modigliani paint it into the background of three additional commissioned portraits. Although wearing a composed expression, the stark whiteness of the sitter's face contrasts harshly with her dark apparel, giving the composition and inner tension and suggesting strong emotions lying beneath the surface. The painting's melancholic overtones have invited comparison with the work of Picasso's Blue Period. The painting is also one of the few Jewish-themed works by Modigliani, who was of Sephardic Jewish descent and publically embraced his Jewish identity.

  • MODIGLIANI, Amedeo

    Modigliani was born in Livorno, Italy, into a family of Sephardic Jews who had little money but a rich cultural life. When he arrived in Paris at the age of 22, he had had eight years of academic training behind him, and possessed a great respect for the old masters and a passionate interest in literature, especially poetry.

    He settled in Montmartre, entered the private Academy of Colorossi, and frequented gatherings of avant-garde artists and poets. Even though he is reported to have had high esteem for Matisse and Picasso, his art, according to scholars, never had any affinity to either the Fauves or the Cubists. Modigliani admired 14th century Italian art (especially the Siena School of painting), and was interested in primitive art in general and African art in particular. African art was an avant-garde