Michael Eric Dyson, “Come Hell or High Water” HAVE-NOTS. HAVES

Click here to load reader

download Michael Eric Dyson, “Come Hell or High Water” HAVE-NOTS. HAVES

of 13

  • date post

    17-Jan-2016
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    213
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Michael Eric Dyson, “Come Hell or High Water” HAVE-NOTS. HAVES

Slide 1HAVE-NOTS.
HAVES.
Excerpt from Come Hell or High Water: Hurricane Katrina and the Color of Disaster by Michael Eric Dyson. Copyright © 2007 by Michael Eric Dyson. Used by permission of Basic Civitas Books, a member of the Perseus Books Group.
The American economy produces more goods
and services than the
FACT:
Additional Information
The total value of the goods and services produced annually by a nation is
known as its gross domestic product, or GDP.
Here are some other ways of comparing the wealth of the United States to
that of other countries:
— In 2008, according to the World Bank, the GDP of the United
States was about $14.2 trillion, almost a quarter of the GDP of the
entire world.
— According to the International Monetary Fund’s estimates for 2009,
the United States ranked sixth in the world in GDP per capita—
behind Qatar, Luxembourg, Norway, Brunei, and Singapore.
— For a full list of countries and their GDPs, see
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/DATASTATISTICS/Resources/GDP.pdf
one man alone …
Bill Gates
Bill Gates
Additional Information 
Bill Gates, co-founder of the software company Microsoft, is one of the
wealthiest people in the world. In 2010, he was named the second-
wealthiest person, with a net worth of $53 billion.
Bill Gates’s personal net worth could provide 250,000 Americans with
$40,000 per year for five years. 
In 2007, the CEOs of the 15 largest corporations in the United States earned
500 times more than the average U.S. worker.
Bill Gates also runs one of the largest charitable foundations on earth. The
Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has an endowment of $33.5 billion and
donates $3 billion every year to improve healthcare and to reduce poverty
throughout the world.
About the Photo
A homeless man asks for help in New York City in 2007.
Additional Information
13.2% of the people in the United States live in poverty, including 19% of all
children. (That’s about 14 million children.)
In 2007, the poverty rate among African Americans (24.7%) and Hispanics
(23.2%) exceeded the poverty rate among non-Hispanic whites (8.6%) and
Asians (11.8%).
In 2007, the U.S. Census Bureau defined poverty as is a family of five living
on less than $25,694 per year, a single parent with two children living on
less than $17,346 per year, or a single individual living on less than $11,201
per year.
Additional Information
At the most expensive restaurant in the United States, a sushi restaurant in
New York City, people fork over more than $400 per person for a meal.
$400 could feed an average household in the U.S. for about a month.
A soup kitchen in
About this Photo
People stand in line at a soup kitchen in Detroit, Michigan, in
November 2008.
Additional Information
In 2008, 49.1 million people in the U.S. lived in “food insecure”
households—that’s 14.4% of the country’s adults and 22.5% of the
children.
Food insecure households go without food at times or settle for lower
quality diets.
Children from food insecure homes are more likely to develop
behavioral or learning problems than children from food secure
homes.
Statistically, rates of poverty and food insecurity are higher for
children of color than for white children.
Households headed by single mothers are 25 times more likely to be
food insecure than two-parent households.
Some 37 million people—one in eight Americans—received food aid
in 2009, up 46% from 2006 as a result of the recession.
The average
About the Photo
A high school student in English class in New York City.
Additional Information 
85% of adults age 25 and over in the United States have completed high
school, and 27% have completed college or a higher level of education.
And yet,
at a fifth-grade level.
Additional Information 
20% of high school seniors are functionally illiterate. A person who is
functionally illiterate may be able to read and write, but not well enough to
deal with the ordinary practical needs of everyday life.
Approximately three million people in the United States cannot read at all.
Workers who don’t have a high school diploma earn a mean monthly
income of $452; workers with a college degree earn a mean monthly
income of $1,829.
About 18 million of them are vacant.
Additional Information 
In the United States, a foreclosure crisis began in 2007, resulting in an
unprecedented number of vacant homes. Homes go into foreclosure when
mortgage holders are unable to make payments on their homes and
banks assume ownership of the property.
In addition, the financial crisis, which also began in 2007, as well as the
resulting recession, drove up unemployment and caused even more people
to default on their mortgages.
And yet, 3.5 million Americans will be homeless for
at least a few nights this year.
About the Photo
A family in their car in Los Angeles, California, in 1987.
Additional Information 
In the United States, 1.35 million children are likely to experience
homelessness in a given year.
On any given night in the U.S., about 670,000 people are homeless.
Lack of affordable housing is the main cause of homelessness for families.
During the recession that began in 2007, a combination of rising housing
costs and declining wages created conditions that made it harder for people
to find or stay in their housing.
The website for the National Coalition for the Homeless provides information
about homelessness, including its causes and consequences. See
http://www.nationalhomeless.org/factsheets/why.html
at the American Dream?
How deep are the roots of inequality?
What is the American Dream? • wealth • safety • happiness • What does it take to get ahead in the world? • values • support • Does race make a difference in who succeeds and who fails? • less than • more than • Are rich kids more likely to make it in life than poor kids? • graduation • incarceration • What can be done to give people equal opportunity to succeed? • chef’s kitchen • soup kitchen • What is the American Dream? • wealth • safety • happiness • What does it take to get ahead in the world? • values • support • Does race make a difference in who succeeds and who fails? • less than • more than • Are rich kids more likely to make it in life than poor kids? • graduation • incarceration • What can be done to give people equal opportunity to succeed? • chef’s kitchen • soup kitchen • What is the American Dream? • wealth • safety • happiness • What does it take to get ahead in the world? • values • support • Does race make a difference in who succeeds and who fails? • less than • more than • Are rich kids more likely to make it in life than poor kids? • graduation • incarceration • What can be done to give people equal opportunity to succeed? • chef’s kitchen • soup kitchen • What is the American Dream? • wealth • safety • happiness • What does it take to get ahead in the world? • values • support • Does race make a difference in who succeeds and who fails? • less than • more than • Are rich kids more likely to make it in life than poor kids? • graduation • incarceration • What can be done to give people equal
put your voice on record
RAWWRITE
Photo Credits
Images © 2010: Alamy Images/RubberBall: 2; Corbis Images/Lynn Goldsmith: 3; Landov, LLC/Xinhua: 4; Getty Images/Anderson Ross: 5; Getty Images/Spencer Platt: 6; Alamy Images/David Grossman: 7; Alamy Images/Design Pics Inc.: 8; Corbis Images/William Manning: 9; Falkland Road Inc./©Mary Ellen Mark: 10.
Raw Write Prompts (as seen in the background of this slide)