Mentoring & Retaining Youth/Young Adults Extension Council Youth Leadership (ECYL) Topic #6...

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Transcript of Mentoring & Retaining Youth/Young Adults Extension Council Youth Leadership (ECYL) Topic #6...

  • Mentoring & Retaining Youth/Young AdultsExtension CouncilYouth Leadership(ECYL)Topic #6Produced by the Council Leadership Development Committee Missouri Council Leadership Development - a partnership of the Missouri Extension County Council Leadership Council andUniversity of Missouri Extension

    (c) 2007 University of Missouri Board of Curators. Updated October 2011. University of Missouri Extension does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, religion, age, disability, or status as a Vietnam-era veteran in employment or program. Funding for this project was made possible bya grant from the Surdna Foundation and theNational 4-H Council.

  • Extension Council Youth Leadership(ECYL)Topic #6LearningObjectives:

    Understand what factors contribute to a young persons success in serving on a local board or council.

    Identify how mentoring determines retention or attrition of young people.

    Grasp what youth are looking for in a council mentor.

    Understand and apply good mentoring practices.

    Demonstrate facilitation and group process techniques that engage younger members.

  • Mentoring & Retaining Youth/Young AdultsCharacteristics of a good mentor

    Guidelines for pairing youth with mentors

    When something isnt working

    Excerpt from 15 Points: Successfully Involving Young People in Decision-Making. (2006). Youth on Board, Inc.: Somerville, MA. http://www.youthonboard.org.

  • Mentoring & Retaining Youth/Young AdultsCharacteristics of a good mentorAbility to relate to young peopleEnthusiasmPatienceKnowledge baseOverall personality

    Excerpt from 15 Points: Successfully Involving Young People in Decision-Making. (2006). Youth on Board, Inc.: Somerville, MA. http://www.youthonboard.org.

  • Mentoring & Retaining Youth/Young AdultsGuidelines for pairing youth with a mentorKnow each other alreadyLive nearby (transportation to meetings)Male to male, female to femaleCommon vocations or interestsParental approvalAllow young people voice in the match

    Excerpt from 15 Points: Successfully Involving Young People in Decision-Making. (2006). Youth on Board, Inc.: Somerville, MA. http://www.youthonboard.org.

  • Mentoring & Retaining Youth/Young AdultsWhat if something isnt working?Designate a staff person to coordinateSchedule periodic check-ins with youth membersAsk for informal evaluations of pairings after a few council meetings Spend time with youth outside of meetingsInvolve parents

    Excerpt from 15 Points: Successfully Involving Young People in Decision-Making. (2006). Youth on Board, Inc.: Somerville, MA. http://www.youthonboard.org.

  • Mentoring Youth Representatives Actions to Ensure Youth Are:

    Informed + Engaged + Supported = Retained Members

    InformedEngagedSupported---------

  • Mentoring & Retaining Youth/Young AdultsAction StepIdentify two persons who will serve as mentors to new youth/young adult members.Record steps mentors will take to ensure young people are informed, engaged, and supported.

  • County Extension Council Training Module

    Extension Council Youth Leadership (ECYL)Produced by the Council Leadership Development Committee a partnership of the Missouri Extension County Council Leadership Council and University of Missouri Extension http://extension.missouri.edu/extcouncil/training/Funding for this project was made possible bya grant from the Surdna Foundation and theNational 4-H Council.

    Introduce Topic #6.

    *Read through learning objectives. Lets check for understanding. Does anyone have any questions about the learning objectives? Is it clear what you will learn from this session?Facilitate Human Map activity here. Activity can be found at:http://extension.missouri.edu/extcouncil/documents/ecyl/energizer-activities.pdf

    This activity helps us step back in time (a long distance for some; shorter for others) to consider the adults who had a positive influence on our lives. The stories illustrates the importance of mentors and suggests how essential caring adults are to the success of youth-adult partnerships.

    *In this section, we will discuss characteristics of a good mentor, guidelines for pairing youth with mentors, and how to address problems that may arise.*Pass out So Youre Going to Be a Mentor handout.http://extension.missouri.edu/extcouncil/documents/ecyl/so-youre-going-to-be-a-mentor.pdf

    Many people feel that being a mentor requires special skills, but mentors are simply people who exercise the qualities of good role model.

    Characteristics of a good mentor include:

    Relating to young people Enthusiasm Patience Knowledge base Overall personality

    What are some more characteristics of a good mentor that you would name?

    They give insights about keeping on task and setting goals and priorities. Mentors not only are successful themselves, but they also foster success in others. Mentors are available as a resource and a sounding board.

    *Its not always easy to pair youth with a mentor, but here are a few basic guidelines that can help when making matches. Try to look for a pair that knows each other already and lives nearby for easier transportation to and from meetings. Keep pairings male to male, and female to female consider common vocations or interests between youth and adults. Remember to get parental approval and allow young people a voice in the match.

    Ask participants if there are other guidelines they would add.

    *Despite best efforts, sometimes pairings between mentors and a young people just do not workout. What might be some signs that it isnt going well?

    Examples might include:One or the other complains about the pairingYouth are overly quiet or withdrawn during and before/after meetingsNo interaction between mentors and youth is observed during or before/after meetingsProbably the biggest sign of all would be youth not coming to meetings. (This is not the only thing that would prevent youth from attending--but ask!)

    Some tips include: Designate a staff person to coordinate a different pairing.Schedule periodic check-ins with youth members to make them feel more comfortable, and see how they like their mentor. A good way to prevent a problem is ask youth for an informal evaluation of their pairing after council meetings or spend time with youth outside of meetings. Make sure you are keeping parents aware of what is happening.*Once youth have been paired with a mentor, councils can take some actions that will enhance the likelihood of youth being retained in their position as representatives on County Extension Councils. Youth have to be informed, engaged, and supported. To put it in the for of an equation: informed + engaged + supported = retained.

    Lets go over each of these further.

    Informed What do youth need to know about the County Extension Council, its leadership, membership, annual schedule, meeting agenda, and process? How about the county extension budget, programs, priorities, and staff?

    This includes all the information youth need to be informed decision-makers on council.Supported How will the needs of youth be met by adults with whom they are serving?

    This involves making youth feel welcome at meetings, helping them gain confidence in speaking up during meetings, voicing their opinions and ideas, and supporting their efforts (even if it takes them a while to catch on).

    Adults checking in with youth after meetings to reflect on how it went. If conflict arises in council discussions, helping youth put the conflict in context. Other basics like meeting time and place, transportation to/from meetings, maybe even having food if they are coming straight from school/extracurricular activities. Remembering the value of humor and striving to develop genuine relationships with teens.Engaged How well council leaders facilitate the meeting so that youth are included and their voices are heard. Facilitation skills make all the difference. Good facilitators have many tactics for maximizing input and participation without putting anyone on the spot.

    Some techniques might include open-ended questions, like What do the rest of you think? or Lets hear from those who havent spoken on this issue yet. Meeting techniques such as breaking into small groups, going round-robin to give each person a chance to speak, or using Delphi technique or other group voting methods may be used.*It is now time to apply what youve learned about mentoring and retaining youth and young adults. Please return to your small groups by county once again to complete the necessary action steps.

    The group should identify two council members to mentor prospective/new young adult members. Groups should maintain the same recorder as in previous sections so that all action steps get recorded by the same person in the same place. The group should identify steps mentors will take to ensure young people are informed, engaged, and supported.Read through the action steps and ask for questions. Give groups about 10-15 minutes to discuss and record their action steps.

    Optional handouts for adults:Create a Training Plan http://extension.missouri.edu/extcouncil/documents/ecyl/create-a-training-plan.pdfUsing Structured Activities for Working with Groups - http://extension.missouri.edu/extcouncil/documents/ecyl/using-structured-activities.pdf

    Optional handouts for youth:Tips for Youth Leaders from Youth Leaders http://extension.missouri.edu/extcouncil/documents/ecyl/tips-for-youth-leaders-from-youth-leaders.pdf What do I do? Ive been nominated? http://extension.missouri.edu/extcouncil/documents/ecyl/what-do-i-do-ive-been-nominated.pdfSo Youve Got Yourself a Mentor http://extension.missouri.edu/extcouncil/documents/ecyl/so