McKay on peirce/LLED 489b files/McKay ElfHO.pdf Sandra Lee McKay Hello! Hello! Hello! Outline...

download McKay on peirce/LLED 489b files/McKay ElfHO.pdf Sandra Lee McKay Hello! Hello! Hello! Outline Defining

of 10

  • date post

    12-Mar-2020
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    2
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of McKay on peirce/LLED 489b files/McKay ElfHO.pdf Sandra Lee McKay Hello! Hello! Hello! Outline...

  • Sandra Lee McKayHello!

    Hello! Hello!

    Hello!

    Outline

    Defining Present‐Day English Use World Englishes

    Three Types of English Users  (Kachru, 1986)

    USA, UK,  Australia

    Philippines,  South Africa

    China,  Hungary

    Aim of World Englishes Model

  • Limitations to World Englishes  View

     Present‐Day use is far more complex  Growing number of standardized varieties of English  in both the Outer Circle and the Expanding Circle

     English functions as a second language  withnativizedforms in intranational and regional  domains (e.g. Europe)

     There are varieties of English within countries  Proficiency levels are also significant  Does not recognize the localized nature of English  language use for bilingual/multilingual individuals

    Formal

    Careful

    Consultative

    Casual

    Intimate

    Advanced

    Adept

    Intermediate

    Basic

    Rudimentary

    Pakir’s Expanding Triangles of  Singapore English  Cline of Formality Cline of Proficiency

    English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) Pragmatic Features (Seidlhofer,  2004)  Misunderstandings are not frequent

     Resolved by a change of topic or negotiation  (rephrasing, repetition)

     Interference from L1 interactional norms is very rare  Suspension of expectations regarding norms

     Interlocuteurs adopt a “let‐it‐pass principle”  Overtly consensus‐oriented  Cooperative  Mutually supportive  Robust 

    Grammatical Features (VOICE  database)  Characterized by use of grammatical forms which,  though often emphasized in classrooms, do not cause  communicative problems:

    They should  go, no?

    I lost bookThe boy  which I met

    She like  chocolate

    I like black  colour

    I want that  we go  swimming

    We do  swimming

    We have to  study about  English

    Grammatical Features (VOICE  database)  Characterized by use of grammatical forms which,  though often emphasized in classrooms, do not cause  communicative problems:  Dropping the third person present‐tense –s  Confusing the relative pronouns who and which  Omitting or adding indefinite or definite articles  Failing to use correct tag questions  Inserting redundant prepositions  Overusing verbs of high semantic generality  Replacing infinitive‐constructions with that‐clauses  Overdoing explicitness

  • Phonological Features (Jenkins,  2000)  Breakdowns in ELF communication are usually  between speakers of different L1 backgrounds

     Most due to pronunciation problems  Jenkins identified a phonological Lingua Franca Core

     Suggested pedagogical focus of ELT classrooms

    Phonological Features most crucial  for ELF communication

    Global Spread of English  Homogeny position

     Globalization homogeny of culture  Favourable (Crystal, 2003)   Unfavourable (Phillipson, 1992)

     Imperialism  Colonization  Loss of other languages

     Heterogeny position  Globalization pluricentricism of language and culture

     World Englishes perspective

     Neither position accounts for hybridity, fluidity, and  human agency

    English as an International Lingua  Franca (EILF)

    E.g. EILF in rural Japan (Kubota  &McKay, forthcoming)

    Locals assume migrants should speak English

    Global role of English exerting  invisible symbolic power

    “You can’t soar into the  world with Portuguese… Improving Japan with  Portuguese won’t let the  country soar into the  world” (teacher)

    RECENT FINDINGS

  • Imagined Communities as  Incentives for English Learning

    Investing in English  reap benefits of  social and intellectual mobility

    If Afghan children learn  English, they will be able to  discuss their problems with 

    people of the world (Pakistani  student)

    If I learn English, I can go to  the United States and earn a  good salary (Luz, age 25, Peru)

    I dream my children might  someday live abroad in a 

    “bigger world”‐ even if they  have to live aboard as beggars  (less affluent mother, South 

    Korea)

    Imagined communities in ELT  business: British Hills, Japan  A leisure language‐learning complex that seeks to  simulate an “authentic” English speaking  environment

     Sales slogan: “more English than England itself”  Depicts a Britain far from the  multilingual/multicultural Britain of today: “replaces  reality, becomes its own reality” (Seargant, 2005)

     http://www.british‐hills.co.jp/english/

    Role of Identity in Language  Learning

    Institutional Identities (Harklau, 2000) Peer‐based Identity (Duff,  2002)

  • Identity and Agency  Desire and language ability to adopt the “right” way of  acting must be taken into account 

    Technology and Language Learning

    Almon: Chinese immigrant  teenager (Lam, 2000)

    •Designed his own home page •Joined an electronic community interested in Japanese pop culture.

    Almon: Chinese immigrant  teenager (Lam, 2000)

    “I’m not as fearful, or afraid of the future, that I  won’t have a future. … When I was feeling negative,  I felt the world doesn’t belong to me, and it’s hard  to survive here…. I didn’t feel like I belong to this  world… But now I feel there’s nothing much to be  afraid of. … It’s not like the world always has power  over you.  It has [names a few chat mates and e‐mail  pen pals] who helped me to chance and encouraged  me” (interview, October 5, 1997)

    Fanfiction (Black, 2006)

    http://www.fanfiction.net/book/Twilight/

    Obstacles to using technology in  the classroom  Teachers uncomfortable being displaced from a  position of expertise

     Technical requirements not met  Slow internet connection  Old computers needing to be rebooted  Children without access to home computers  Insufficient number of computers  Large class sizes

  • Overcoming obstacles to using  technology in the classroom  Teachers need time and training  Reconceptualization of “literacy” in a broader  framework including technology

     Up‐to‐date hardware

    CHALLENGES AHEAD

    Inequality of Access in English  learning

    Less affluent families often cannot afford  special English learning programs

    Economic divide often reinforced by  Ministries of Education

    Inequality Example:  English was a key component in the national  modernization program (1976)

     Policy was to strengthen English language teaching in  elite schools  Elite schools produce English‐proficient personnel  needed to modernize nation

     Economically‐developed provinces given autonomy to  create own curricula, syllabi and textbooks

     Early learning of English is promoted  State mandates determine access to English

    Chin a

    Inequality Example:  (Choi, 2003)  Department of Education asks schools to adopt Chinese as  the medium of instruction (1997)

     Allows a minority of elite schools to continue English  instruction  Cost‐effective strategy of training in English skills for those  who had the economic and cultural capital to benefit from it

     Majority of students barred from the “language of power and  wealth” as a business strategy

     Parents struggle to send children to expensive  international school or overseas to gain perceived  economic capital of learning English 

    Hong Kong  Inequality Example: South (Park and Abelman, 2004)  English is a “class marker” in South Korean society  English language market: $3,333 million per year  Study abroad programs: $833 million per year

    Korea

  • Inequality Example:  (Leibowitz, 2005)  University instruction shifted from Afrikaans to  English in 1990s

     Many black students had little English school experience  under apartheid  Mother‐tongue instruction in townships  Emphasis on domestic and agricultural work

     Lack interpersonal and academic skills needed in academic  discourse

    South Africa  Inequality Example:  (Ramanathan, 1999)  Students from lower castes lack exposure to both  English and the discourse of schools

    India

    Critical Issues of Access A Tendency of Othering in EILF  Pedagogy

    Effects of Othering The Question of Standards

  • Two Views of Standards EXONORMATIVE  (determined by outside  context of use)

     Concern to maintain  mutual intelligibility

     Quirk (1984): tolerance for  variation in language use  is educationally