Market Trolley

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Universal trolley that enables the user to adjust the width/length to stack various sized crates. A cord threads through each corner and when pulled by the user, the tension clamps in the crates. After transporting the crates to the stall area, the user has the option to either leave the crates on (use as part of the stall) or remove them, close up the trolley and place it out of sight until required. (Jan-Feb 2011)

Transcript of Market Trolley

  • HUMAN FACTORS ANDETHNOGRAPHY

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY2

    Introduction

    Initial Research Findings

    Analysis of Initial Research

    Area of Interest Research

    Area of Inquiry

    Ergonomics Research

    Concept Sheets

    Change to Area of Inquiry

    Ergonomic Research for New Area of Inquiry

    Trolley Prototype V1

    Testing V1 Prototype

    Average Stall Sizes

    Trolley Prototype V2

    CAD Model of Prototype

    Orthographic Drawings

    In this research document...Page

    3

    4-10

    11

    12-16

    17

    18-19

    20-22

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    24-27

    28-30

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    33-36

    37-38

    39-40

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY3

    Introduction

    With the brief in mind, I will first visit several markets that sell food, products, antiques, etc. At each market, I will use photography as a main tool of documentation but will also be taking notes of different experiences and answers I get from the stallholders. From my observations, I will be able to examine how customers and stallholders interact within the market place and therefore see if there are any problems that may need to be researched further.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY4

    INITIAL RESEARCH FINDINGSBorough Market is one of Londons largest and oldest food markets, dating back to 1014. Even after being closed by the parliament of 1755, the Southwark residents revived the area by buying back the triangular plot of land that is now the heart of the market.

    In the centre of the market, the layout of the stalls is cleverly planned to work alongside the buildings pillars so that space is saved to allow the customers to move freely around without feeling

    too compact. It also means that the traders can more easily set up, bring in stock and remove waste products. Mixtures of natural and artificial lights diffuse throughout the entire area along with a constant change of interesting smells. The temperature maintains the same as outdoors plus it is sheltered from the rain. Being a semi open-air market, the atmospheric conditions make

    the users and workers overall experience more comforting. Therefore contributing to keeping a friendly well being within the traders. BOROUGH M

    ARKET

    Most of the customers that visit are tourists but there is still a large group of nearby restaurant chefs and amateur cooks that come to buy the fresh produce. Even though haggling/bartering is legal in high street stores, it is uncommon for people to do. Whereas in a

    market place, haggling/bartering is seen as a norm and socially accepted.

    Borough Market was and still is important to society. Whether it being more important to attract tourists or local companies, the market place will always be needed.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY5

    WASTE AND STORAGE

    Marked pathways direct the stallholders straight to either an area for the card and plastic crates to be stored or to the selection of waste bins. The waste system there

    also encourages the stallholders to recycle or re-use whatever they can by allocating different types of waste to specific bins, therefore reducing the amount of landfill waste.

    Having these systems at Borough Market makes the stallholders day simpler by reducing the time it takes to setup in the morning, replenish throughout the day and

    takedown at the end of the day.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY6

    MARKET STALLS

    There are around 3-4 types of market stalls in Borough Market. In the top photo is the traditional market layout, which is mainly in the Jubilee market area. Neighbouring the stallholders together like this creates stronger security as the

    stallholders can easily watch over each other, which is especially helpful when there is only one worker on the stall.

    The middle and bottom photo includes very different types of stalls compared to the standard layout. The middle photo shows an enclosed stall, meaning that the customer has to ask over a high counter to view or purchase the product. The bottom photo shows an uncommon layout for a market stall, the layout is more of a miniature store so that customers are encouraged to browse the products on show. However, this type is more vulnerable to theft.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY7

    CUSTOMERS

    The markets layout allows easy movement around each area for the customers. Even at peak times, customers can still easily browse different stalls. There is also seating provided so that customers are encouraged to buy the ready-made food at the market.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY8

    QUALITY

    One of the biggest elements that attract customers to Borough Market is the attention to quality. This

    is achieved by many factors but one of the main aspects that make me want to revisit is the ability to talk to the skilled traders and ask them about where the product was sourced and manufactured. With food and drink products especially, you can ask for the traders personal opinions on how to store, prepare, what other products work well with it, etc.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY9

    SPIT

    ALFI

    ELDS

    MAR

    KET

    However, if the stallholders want to add any more structural properties they have to provide for

    themselves, usually they make good use of the plastic and card storage crates they brought the products in as part of the stall. They usually provide themselves with little tools to clip or hang products as well. I also saw this occurring especially at Stratford Market, which spreads from the inside of the shopping centre to the exterior. At Stratford, I have seen stallholders use storage crates to make up over half of their stall.

    CONSTRUCTION At Spitalfields Market, the stallholders are supplied with the standard metal framing and lighting to create their stalls.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY10

    MISCELLANEOUS

    There arent many market places with public toilets but Spitalfields supplies this service for customers. Whereas at Borough Market I couldnt find any public toilets so you would have to go into a nearby pub or restaurant.

    Another point worth mentioning is the decreasing amount of people that carry round cash. A small

    amount of stallholders have taken this developing problem into account and now supply card payments as an option. The owners of Spitalfields have also taken this account and have installed ATMs at various points within the complex.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY11

    ANALYSIS OF INITIAL RESEARCHI have also been noting down the activities of one other market in Stratford. As I walk through Stratford Centres market nearly everyday, I have noticed how the stallholders there use most of the plastic and card crates not only as a tool to transport products but to build up to 50% of their stall and even pieces of unsteady furniture. Stratford probably does this the most out of the markets I visited but many other markets also use their crates as ingenious multipurpose tools. Therefore I will study this area of interest further by returning to some of these markets to document the daily lives of simple storage crates.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY12

    AREA OF INTEREST RESEARCH

    The majority of stallholders I have seen around various markets use trolleys, which come in all kinds of shapes and sizes. However after they have been used and the stall is setup, they can become obtrusive.

    For example, the bottom left image shows how the trolley and the crates are obstructing the entrance, this causes less attraction to the stall.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY13

    The photos best describe how stallholders use the storage crates as part of the stalls structure. Yet,

    some stallholders still bring wooden or plastic trestles specifically to setup, which leaves the storage crates cluttering up their workspace.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY14

    These are just some more methods used to transport the products around, starting from the simple

    to the extreme like the hydraulic pallet trolley in the bottom left of the page. Again the trolley would be left at the stall becoming obtrusive.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY15

    The two above photos explain how the

    products are first shipped in on pallet then transferred to small cages. This would be an area worth revising as the stages of transporting the goods could be cut down.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY16

    I noticed how a lot of the

    unused crates are thrown to the side

    throughout the day; these unused crates could be

    used for something else.

  • HUMAN FACTORS AND ETHNOGRAPHY17

    AREA OF INQUIRYFrom this further research, I have seen similar means of transportation, construction and storage around the market environment, this has now given me a greater understanding of the area I want to progress with. I want to look into different methods of using storage crates as part of the stall. Where some stallholders use every crate possible to produce their stall, others put a lot of their crates to the side. Not only do the leftover crates become physically and visually obtrusive to the workers but to the customers as well. This gives the overall market an unorganised and uncomfortable impression. To overcome this, I want to see whether I can reduce the amount of cluttering with spare crates by encouraging the stallholders to try alternative methods. One concept I want to develop is a way of locking and unlocking the crates together. However, if I want to be able to persuade the stallholders to use alternative methods, I will not only need to look at creating a concept that includes go