MARITIME STUDY ON THE USE OF FUEL CELLS IN SHIPPING Study o · PDF file the alkaline fuel...

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Transcript of MARITIME STUDY ON THE USE OF FUEL CELLS IN SHIPPING Study o · PDF file the alkaline fuel...

  • Study on the use of fuel cells in shipping DNV GL 1

    MARITIME

    STUDY ON THE USE OF FUEL CELLS IN SHIPPING

    SAFER, SMARTER, GREENER

    EMSA European Maritime Safety Agency

    Tomas Tronstad Hanne Høgmoen Åstrand Gerd Petra Haugom Lars Langfeldt

    Version 0.1

  • 2 DNV GL Study on the use of fuel cells in shipping

    CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 04

    A: FUEL CELLS IN SHIPPING

    INTRODUCTION 09

    1. FUEL CELL PROJECTS IN SHIPPING 12

    2. PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS OF SELECTED

    PROJECTS 14

    FellowSHIP 14

    FCShip 17

    METHAPU 18

    Nemo H2 19

    SF-BREEZE 20

    Pa-X-ell 20

    US SSFC 22

    Felicitas 24

    MC-WAP 26

    ZemShips 27

    SchIBZ 30

    RiverCell 31

    Project partners details for the selected projects 32

    3. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES 34

    Alkaline fuel cell (AFC) 34

    Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) 36

    High Temperature PEM 37

    Direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) 38

    Phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) 39

    Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) 40

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) 41

    System efficiencies of fuel cells 42

    4. PROMISING FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES

    FOR MARINE USE 43

    Summary of fuel cell technologies 44

    The 3 most promising fuel cell technologies 45

    B: STANDARDS/REGULATIONS/GUIDELINES FOR FUEL CELL INSTALLATION IN SHIPPING

    INTRODUCTION 49

    1. STANDARDS/REGULATIONS AND GUIDELINES

    APPLICABLE FOR FUEL CELLS 53

    European Framework 53

    International Rules –IMO 54

    Classification Rules applicable for Fuel Cell

    installations 59

    Standards for Fuel Cell applications 61

    Fuel specific Standards and Regulations 63

    2. BUNKERING 68

    Bunkering of Liquid Fuels 69

    Bunkering of Gaseous Fuels 72

    3. REGULATORY GAPS 73

    Introduction 73

    Summary of Identified Gaps 74

    IGF Code – Main Gaps 75

    Bunkering 76

    On-board Storage 78

    Fuel Cell System 79

    Different Life Phases of a Ship (Legal,

    Harmonization) 81

    Safety issues for Fuel for Fuel Cells 82

  • Study on the use of fuel cells in shipping DNV GL 3

    C: SAFETY ASSESSMENT OF GENERIC FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS ON RO-PAX VESSELS AND GAS CARRIERS

    INTRODUCTION 86

    Objective 86

    Generic Fuel Cell Application 86

    Limitations 88

    1. METHODOLOGY APPLIED 89

    Formal Safety Assessment 89

    Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) 89

    Workshops 90

    Risk Reducing Philosophy and Alarp Principle 91

    2. ASSESSMENT FINDINGS 92

    Findings separated by FC Types 93

    Most critical FC related Findings 95

    Most critical Vessel specific Findings 98

    Other Vessel specific Findings 98

    3. RECOMMENDATIONS 99

    APPENDIX 100

    Assessment Team 100

    System structure for the risk assessment 101

    Rating scales 102

    ABBREVIATIONS 103

    REFERENCES 104

    FOOTNOTES 105

  • 4 DNV GL Study on the use of fuel cells in shipping

    Chapter A, corresponding to the first block, provides a description of the different fuel cell technologies and an overview of major maritime fuel cell projects to date. Consecutively, Chapter B gives an overview of current applicable standards, regulations and guidelines for bunkering, on-board storage and distribution of fuel as well as use of on-board fuel cell installations. Finally, Chapter C provides a safety assessment, with the analysis of the safety challenges for maritime fuel cell applications, exemplified by a RoPax vessel and a Gas Carrier, based on the most promising fuel cell types identified in Chapter A of the study, namely the PEM, HT-PEM and SOFC.

    In Chapter A, twelve projects are selected and further described. This includes FellowSHIP, FCShip, META- PHU, Nemo H2, FELICITAS, SF-BREEZE, Pa-X-ell, US SSFC, MC-WAP, ZemShips, SchIBZ and RiverCell. Seven different fuel cell technologies have been evaluated; the alkaline fuel cell (AFC), the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), high temperature PEMFC (HT-PEMFC), direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), phos- phoric acid fuel cell (PAFC), molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The choice of these seven fuel cell types was essentially based on their merits, their potential for commercial application, or a combination of both. The nominated technologies were ranked against 11 parameters:

    Relative cost Power levels (kW) Lifetime Tolerance for cycling Flexibility towards type of fuel Technological maturity Physical size Sensitivity for fuel impurities Emissions Safety aspects Efficiency (Electrical and total including heat recovery if applicable)

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    The ranking was weighted for importance, in each of the parameters above, based on specific criteria used in the context of the present study. The three technologies ranked by this exercise to be the most promising for marine use is the solid oxide fuel cell, the PEMFC and the high temperature PEMFC. Short descriptions of these technologies are given below.

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC)

    The PEM fuel cell is a mature technology that has been successfully used both in marine and other high energy applications. The technology is available for a number of applications. The relative maturity of the technology also leads to a relatively low cost. The operation requires pure hydrogen, and the operat- ing temperature is low. The main safety aspects are thus related to the use and storage of hydrogen on a vessel. Energy conversion with a PEM fuel cell, from hydrogen to electricity, would essentially result in wa- ter as the only emission and low quality heat, with the low temperature providing however high tolerance for cycling operation. The efficiency is moderate, around 50-60%, and, with the low operating temper- ature, heat recovery is considered not to be feasible. The modules currently have a size of up to 120kW, and the physical size is small, which is positive for applications in transport, remarkably for marine use.

    The major drawback of the PEMFC technology is sen- sitivity to impurities in the hydrogen as sulphur and CO, a complex water management system (both gas and liquid) and a moderate lifetime. The PEMFC is, in the present study, the technology that has received the highest score in the ranking.

    This study was initiated to provide the European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) with a technical assessment on the use of fuel cells in shipping that, being supported by a technology overview and risk-based analysis, will evaluate their potential and constraints as prime movers and energy sources in shipping.

    The study is essentially divided into three main blocks: A) Technology B) Regulations C) Safety

  • Study on the use of fuel cells in shipping DNV GL 5

    High temperature PEMFC

    The HT-PEMFC is a technology that is less mature than conventional low temperature PEM, addressing however some of the problems with the low temper- ature of the PEM. The higher temperature reduces the sensitivity towards impurities and simplifies the water management since water is only present in gaseous phase. The efficiency is the same as for traditional PEMFCs, possibly somewhat higher due to less parasitic losses, and the higher temperature leads to more excess heat that can be used for ship internal heating purposes. The HT-PEM technology was demonstrated aboard the MS Mariella in Pa-X-ell project with 3 stacks of 30 kW, and in the project MF Vågen, Norway, including a 12kW HT-PEM for small port commuter ferry.

    The higher operating temperature allows eliminating the need for a clean-up reactor after the reformer. Such reactors lower the system efficiency, are expen- sive and space demanding and. Owing to the toler- ance for fuel impurities, simpler, lighter and cheaper reformers can be used to produce hydrogen from a broad range of energy-carriers such as LNG, metha- nol, ethanol or even oil based fuels. The operational temperature of up to 200˚C is assumed moderate enough so that tolerance for cycling is not significantly weakened.

    Solid oxide fuel cell

    The SOFC is a highly efficient, moderately sized fuel cell. The high operating temperatures means that with heat recovery the total fuel efficiency can reach about 85%, and possibly increasing with further development. There is some experience with use of this particular technology in vessels, including the MS Forester in the SchIBZ project. With further develop- ment and experience the price of this technology is expected to be reduced. The fuel cell is flexible towards different fuels, with the reforming from hydrocarbons to hydrogen taking place internally in the cell. The high temperature can be considered a safety concern and, on the environmental perspec- tive, when using hydrocarbon fuels, there will be emissions of CO2 and some NOx. A promising devel- opment for the SOFC technology are hybrid systems

    combining SOFC, heat recovery and batteries, as it is planned for in the SchibZ project. This leads to the possibility of a more flexible operation of the system and, with less cycling of the SOFC, the problems associated with short cycle life are reduced.

    Following the technology descriptions, Chapter B provi