July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 1 Rutgers University Homeland...

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July 9, 2003 Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 1 Rutgers University Homeland Security Research Initiative July 9, 2003 Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 1 anthrax Fred Roberts Chair, RUHSRI Director, DIMACS Center [email protected] gers.edu
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Transcript of July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 1 Rutgers University Homeland...

  • Slide 1
  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 1 Rutgers University Homeland Security Research Initiative July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 1 anthrax Fred Roberts Chair, RUHSRI Director, DIMACS Center [email protected]
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 2 Concerns about security: Physical safety Transportation Food and water supply The fundamental technologies underlying our economic system (communications, computing) The very working of our modern society RUHSRI is aimed at coordinating homeland security research at Rutgers.
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 3 Existing efforts at Rutgers in homeland security research are widespread and impressive. Many could lead quickly to practical R&D programs and new business development. They could easily form the basis for a dozen major initiatives. We present a selection of relevant current research.
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 4 SURVEILLANCE/DETECTION Biosurveillance/chemosurveillance Adverse event/bioterrorist attack detection Pathogen detection (Terahertz (THz) wave imaging; detecting airborne anthrax particles) Weapons detection/identification (dirty bombs, plastic explosives) Analysis of massive, high speed data for anomaly/outlier detection Intelligent question answering (interface between the intelligence analyst and data) Computational/mathematical models in epidemiology
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 5 SURVEILLANCE/DETECTION-II Biometrics Face, gait, voice, iris recognition Non-verbal behavior detection (lying or telling the truth?) Text Surveillance Monitoring message streams for new events Statistical methods in textual analysis
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 6 SURVEILLANCE/DETECTION - III Sensors Bioterrorism sensor location Sensor networks to monitor bio/chem hazards Design of sensors (high sensitivity ZnO sensors; UV detection devices for bio- detection; nanoscale semiconductor sensors) BASIS bioterrorism sensor
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 7 VARIOUS ASPECTS OF SECURITY Communication Security Network security, mobile and wireless security Secure communication through tunable adaptive filters Secure communication through low bit-rate coding Sharing data Information privacy Identity theft Secure e-commerce
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 8 VARIOUS ASPECTS OF SECURITY - II Transportation and Border Security Transportation infrastructure security (airports, marine terminals, transit hubs) Pattern recognition for machine-assisted baggage searches Statistical analysis of flight/aircraft inspections Port-of-entry inspection algorithms Border security (decision support software) Vessel tracking for homeland defense Pipeline security
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 9 VARIOUS ASPECTS OF SECURITY - III Food and Water Supply Security Regional drinking water security consortium Food and water biosecurity initiative Remediating contaminated water Bioterrorism training (environment & public health) Biosafety Level 3 Laboratory for highly secure evalution of pathogens (proposed) Agroterrorism
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 10 RESPONDING TO AN ATTACK Exposure/Toxicology Modeling dose received Rapid risk and exposure characterization Toxicology of WMDs Evacuation Simulating evacuation of complex transportation facilities Plume modeling to determine areas of risk Handling patients before ER admission.
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 11 RESPONDING TO AN ATTACK - II Cleanup Monitoring and control for chem/bio attack emergency response Air and water purification systems Decontamination of areas affected by chem/bio weapons Emergency scene management
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 12 RESPONDING TO AN ATTACK - III Emergency Communications Infostations for rapid wireless communication for first responders Rapid networking at emergency locations Risk communication methods Rapid telecollaboration Legal Responses to Terrorism Analysis of laws to control or suppress terrorism
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 13 STRENGTHS AT RUTGERS Many of the projects described are already receiving external funding. There is already substantial partnership with NJ industry (small and large).
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 14 External Funding/Partners Biosurveillance/chemosurveillance $4M external funding Funding Sources: NSF, ONR, ARDA, Sloan Foundation, Burroughs Wellcome Fund Partners: AT&T, AT&T Wireless, Avaya, Lucent, Merck, Telcordia, Princeton Scientific Instruments, state and local health departments, CDC, Los Alamos Biometrics $4.6M external funding Funding Sources: NSF, NSA, ONR, DHS, DARPA, Picatinny Arsenal Partners: Avaya, Honeywell, Princeton Plasma Physics, Federal Law Enforcement Training Center
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 15 External Funding/Partners Text Surveillance $1.3M external funding Funding Sources: NSF, ICMIC (Intelligence Community) Partners: AT&T, Avaya, Telcordia, Ornarose Inc. (startup) Sensors $3.8M external funding Funding Sources: NSF, AFOSR Partners: Agere, Sarnoff, J&J, Lucent, ExxonMobil, Princeton Optronics, EMCORE, Semandex, NJ Nanotechnology Consortium
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 16 External Funding/Partners Communication Security $4M external funding Funding Sources: NSF, US Dept.of Justice, DARPA Partners: AT&T, Avaya, HP Labs (Princeton), Lucent, Telcordia, Sarnoff Transportation and Border Security $3.6M external funding Funding Sources: NSF, FAA, ONR, DoD Office of Counterdrug Technology Partners: Federal Highway Administration, Port Authority of NY/NJ, NJ Transit, US Coast Guard, US Customs, SAP Corp. (Morristown)
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 17 External Funding/Partners Food and Water Supply Security $3M external funding Funding Sources: EPA, USDA, water utilities Partners: North Jersey water utilities, NJ DEP, The Nature Conservancy Evacuation $250K external funding Funding Sources: US DOT, ONR, EPA Partners: Federal Highway Administration, Port Authority of NY/NJ, NJ Transit
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 18 External Funding/Partners Cleanup $2.2M external funding Funding Sources: ARO, EPA, ONR Emergency Communications $40K external funding Funding Source: NSF
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 19 Current external funding for Homeland Security Research at Rutgers (without a coordinated effort of the type the bond issue could provide) is $31M
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 20 Partial List of Partners at Rutgers Departments.: Computer Science, Chemistry, Physics, Statistics, Mathematics, ECE, Civil and Envir. Engineering Centers: CAIP (Advanced Information Processing), DIMACS (Discrete Math & CS), EOHSI (Environmental & Occupational Health and Safety), WINLAB (Wireless Networking), Institute for Marine and Coastal Studies, Global Change and Governance, CIMIC (Information Management, Integration and Connectivity) Schools: Engineering, SCILS (Information and Library Sciences), Cook College and NJ Agricultural Experimental Station, Business School, Law School, Criminal Justice
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 21 JOBS, GROWTH AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Many NJ industries will benefit from work in homeland security: chemicals, pharmaceuticals, telecom, software development, advanced materials, health care,...
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 22 JOBS, GROWTH AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Putting telecom researchers in NJ back to work: Massive data set methods in use by the telecommunications industry will put many telecom researchers to work on homeland security (already starting). Similarly for network security methods. Business Week forecasts a world market for over a trillion sensors by 2010.
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 23 JOBS, GROWTH AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Vulnerability of our computer systems creates many jobs for the software industry. Expect a great demand for new chemical products to come out of homeland security research Expect a great demand for new drugs to come out of public health biodefense and bioterrorist attack response. US Coast Guard estimates cost of Port of Entry Security in Port of NY/NJ will rise to over $7.3B in next 10 years.
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  • July 9, 2003Commission on Jobs Growth and Economic Development 24 Rutgers University Homeland Security Research Initiative RUHSRI will put NJ to work.