Job Satisfaction

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Job Satisfaction

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CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRYHISTORY OF INDUSTRYThe pharmaceutical industry develops, produces, and markets drugs licensed for use as medications. Pharmaceutical companies are allowed to deal in generic and/or brand medications and medical devices. They are subject to a variety of laws and regulations regarding the patenting, testing and ensuring safety and efficacy and marketing of drugs. The earliest drugstores date back to the Middle Ages since 18th AD. The first known drugstore was opened by Arabian pharmacists in Baghdad in 754,and many more soon began operating throughout the medieval Islamic world and eventually medieval Europe. By the 19th century, many of the drugstores in Europe and North America had eventually developed into larger pharmaceutical companies. Most of today's major pharmaceutical companies were founded in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Key discoveries of the 1920s and 1930s, such as insulin and penicillin, became mass-manufactured and distributed. Switzerland, Germany and Italy had particularly strong industries, with the UK, US, Belgium and the Netherlands following suit. Legislation was enacted to test and approve drugs and to require appropriate labeling. Prescription and non-prescription drugs became legally distinguished from one another as the pharmaceutical industry matured. The industry got underway in earnest from the 1950s, due to the development of systematic scientific approaches, understanding of human biology (including DNA) and sophisticated manufacturing techniques. Numerous new drugs were developed during the 1950s and mass-produced and marketed through the 1960s. These included the first oral contraceptive, "The Pill", 1

Cortisone,

blood-pressure

drugs

and

other

heart and

medications. the

MAO

Inhibitors, chlorpromazine (Thorazine), Haldol (Haloperidol)

tranquilizers

ushered in the age of psychiatric medication. Valium (diazepam), discovered in 1960, was marketed from 1963 and rapidly became the most prescribed drug in history, prior to controversy over dependency and habituation. Attempts were made to increase regulation and to limit financial links between companies and prescribing physicians, including by the relatively new U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Such calls increased in the 1960s after the thalidomide tragedy came to light, in which the use of a new tranquilizer in pregnant women caused severe birth defects. In 1964, the World Medical Association issued its Declaration of Helsinki, which set standards for clinical research and demanded that subjects give their informed consent before enrolling in an experiment. Pharmaceutical companies became required to prove efficacy in clinical trials before marketing drugs. Cancer drugs were a feature of the 1970s. From 1978, India took over as the primary center of pharmaceutical production without patent protection. The industry remained relatively small scale until the 1970s when it began to expand at a greater rate. Legislation allowing for strong patents, to cover both the process of manufacture and the specific products, came in to force in most countries. By the mid1980s, small biotechnology firms were struggling for survival, which led to the formation of mutually beneficial partnerships with large pharmaceutical companies and a host of corporate buyouts of the smaller firms. Pharmaceutical manufacturing became concentrated, with a few large companies holding a dominant position throughout the world and with a few companies producing medicines within each country. The pharmaceutical industry entered the 1980s pressured by economics and a host of new regulations, both safety and environmental, but also transformed by new DNA chemistries and new technologies for analysis and computation. Drugs for heart disease and for AIDS were a feature of the 1980s, involving challenges to regulatory bodies and a faster approval process.

2

Controversy about drug development and testingDue to accusations and findings that some clinical trials conducted or funded by pharmaceutical companies may report only positive results for the preferred medication, the industry has been looked at much more closely by independent groups and government agencies. In response to specific cases in which unfavorable data from pharmaceutical companysponsored research was not published, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America have published new guidelines urging companies to report all findings and limit the financial involvement in drug companies of researchers. US congress signed into law a bill which requires phase II and phase III clinical trials to be registered by the sponsor on the clinical trials.gov website run by the NIH. Drug researchers not directly employed by pharmaceutical companies often look to companies for grants, and companies often look to researchers for studies that will make their products look favorable. Sponsored researchers are rewarded by drug companies, for example with support for their conference/symposium costs. Lecture scripts and even journal articles presented by academic researchers may actually be 'ghost-written' by pharmaceutical companies. Some researchers who have tried to reveal ethical issues with clinical trials or who tried to publish papers that show harmful effects of new drugs or cheaper alternatives have been threatened by drug companies with lawsuits.

Regulatory Authorities

International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) European Medicines Agency (EMEA) Therapeutic Goods Administration (Australia) (TGA) U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (Japan) Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) 3

Central Drugs Standards Control Organisation (India) (CDSCO) Ukrainian Drug Registration Agency Medicines Authority (Malta)

Market leaders in terms of salesThe top 15 pharmaceutical companies by 2008 sales are: Rank Company Sales ($M) Based/Headquartered in

1

Pfizer

43,363

United States

2

GlaxoSmithKline

36,506

United Kingdom

3

Novartis

36,506

Switzerland

4

Sanofi-Aventis

35,642

France

5

AstraZeneca

32,516

United Kingdom

6

HoffmannLa Roche 30,336

Switzerland

7

Johnson & Johnson

29,425

United States

8

Merck & Co.

26,191

United States

9

Abbott

19,466

United States

10

Eli Lilly and Company 19,140 4

United States

Rank

Company

Sales ($M)

Based/Headquartered in

11

Amgen

15,794

United States

12

Wyeth

15,682

United States

13

Teva

15,274

Israel

14

Bayer

15,660

Germany

15

Takeda

13,819

Japan

INDIAN PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRYThe Indian pharmaceutical industry is the world's fourth-largest by volume and is likely to lead the manufacturing sector of India. The earliest pharmaceutical companies in India are Bengal Chemicals, East India Pharmaceutical works limited, IDPL etc. which still exist today as one of 5 governmentowned drug manufacturers. For the next 60 years, most of the drugs in India were imported by multinationals either in fully formulated or bulk form. The government started to encourage the growth of drug manufacturing by Indian companies in the early 1960s, and with the Patents Act in 1970. However, economic liberalization in 90s by the former Prime Minister P.V. Narasimha Rao and the then Finance Minister, Dr. Manmohan Singh enabled the industry to become what it is today. This patent act removed composition patents from food and drugs, and though it kept process patents, these were shortened to a period of five to seven years. The lack of patent protection made the Indian market undesirable to the multinational companies that had dominated the market, and while they streamed out. Indian 5

companies carved a niche in both the Indian and world markets with their expertise in reverse-engineering new processes for manufacturing drugs at low costs. Although some of the larger companies have taken baby steps towards drug innovation, the industry as a whole has been following this business model until the present. India's biopharmaceutical industry clocked a 17 percent growth with revenues of Rs.137 billion ($3 billion) in the 2009-10 financial year over the previous fiscal. Bio-pharma was the biggest contributor generating 60 percent of the industry's growth at Rs.8,829 crore, followed by bio-services at Rs.2,639 crore and bio-agri at Rs.1,936 crore.

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Rank

Company

Revenue 2010 (USD millions)

1

Cipla

1348.51

2

Ranbaxy

1327.56

3

Dr. Reddy's 1178 Laboratories

4

Lupin Ltd

929.84

5

Aurobindo Pharma

865.19

6

Dabur

700.3

7

Sun Pharmaceutical 673.99

8

Cadila Healthcare

629.45

9

Jubilant Lifesciences 561.03

10

Piramal Healthcare

480.26

11

GlaxoSmithKline 475.8 Pharmaceuticals Ltd

12

Ipca Laboratories

390

13

Wockhardt

381.23

14

Torrent Pharmaceuticals 7

380.2

15

Sterling Bio

358.1

16

Biocon

340.38

ChallengesThe biotech sector faces some major challenges in its quest for growth. Chief among them is a lack of funding, particular