Introduction to Audience Research MUS 588 ¢â‚¬¢ Winter...

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  • Morrissey & Owen 2009 • 1 •

    
 Introduction
to
Audience
Research

 MUS
588
•
Winter
2009
 
 
 
 
 
 Kris
Morrissey,
PhD
 Director,
Museology
Program
 685.8207/
Morriss8@u.washington.edu
 
 Office
Hours:
Tues.
10‐11:30
&
Fri
1‐2
 Schedule
through
Lisa
 


    Kathryn
Owen
 Education
Research
Supervisor
 Woodland
Park
Zoo
 
 Office
Hours:
Weds
10‐12,
Fri
9‐11


    
 
 Class
Time
and
Location
 
 Mondays
&
Wednesdays
 
 3:30‐5:00,
Johnson
Hall

022
 Readings
 Practical
Evaluation
Guide,
Judy
Diamond
 Visitor
Surveys:
A
User’s
Manual
 Research
Design
(3rd
edition),
John
 Creswell
 
 Selected
Articles


    
 


    Web
Resources
 www.informalscience.org
 (archives
and
resources)
 


    Visitor
Studies
Association
archives
 www2.informalscience.org/vsa
 
 Shaping
Outcomes
Online
Workshop
 http://www.shapingoutcomes.org/course/
 
 http://www.astc.org/resource/visitors/index. htm)
 
 


    
 Course
Goals
 
 • Understand
the
role
evaluation
plays
in


    planning,
facilitating,
and
assessing
 visitor
experiences
in
museums.


    
 • Describe
and
discuss
the
role
of
the
most


    common
types
of
evaluation
used
by
 museums.


    • Design
an
audience
research
study.
 
 • Understand
and
be
able
to
use
the


    literature
available
about
visitors.
 


  • Morrissey & Owen 2009 • 2 •

    Overview
of
course
 
 
 This
course
is
an
overview
of
the
field
of
audience
research
and
introduces
the
basic
 functions,
practices,
ethics
and
literature.
Audience
Research
enhances
the
experience
of
 the
visitor
and
advance
the
mission
of
a
museum
by
providing
data
that
supports
 knowledgeable
decisions
about
programs,
exhibits
and
other
interactions
with
visitors.

 
 The
course
is
not
designed
to
fully
prepare
students
to
design
and
conduct
visitor
 studies,
but
rather
to
acquaint
them
with
basic
concepts
and
principles
and
a
range
of
ways
 to
assess
experiences.
The
course
will
not
cover
statistics
or
data
analysis.
The
field
of
 audience
research
(or
visitor
studies)
is
a
growing
and
important
field.
Students
interested
 in
becoming
evaluators
are
encouraged
to
pursue
additional
training.




    
 
 Topics
and
Themes
 


     Purpose
of
visitor
research


     Types
of
evaluation
including
front‐end,
formative,
summative
and
remedial



     Development
of
instruments


     Qualitative,
quantitative
and
mixed
methods


     Validity
and
reliability


     Relationships
and
distinctions
between
research
and
evaluation


     Ethics
and
responsibilities


  • Morrissey & Owen 2009 • 3 •

    
Assignments
•
2009
•
Draft
 


    All
assignments
are
due
in
drop
box
unless
otherwise
stated.
 
 Human
Subjects
Research

 
 
 
 
 
 5
points
 
 
 
 Complete
the
online
student
course
for
Human
Subjects
research
offered
through
University
of
 Washington
(CITI).
You
will
have
to
first
register
and
login
in
and
then
take
the
Student
Course,
 estimated
to
take
30
minutes.
Print
and
submit
a
PDF
in
the
Drop
Box.
Due
Jan.
12.
 www.citiprogram.org/

 
 
 Evaluation
Reports

 
 
 
 
 
 
 15
points

 
 Read
one
evaluation
report
and
submit
a
one
page
brief
and
give
a
five‐minute
synopsis
to
the
 rest
of
the
class
including
the
primary
research/evaluation
question
or
goal,
research
site,
 methods,
and
results.

Discuss
whether
you
think
the
interpretation
of
the
results
is
consistent
 with
the
findings
and
methodology
(i.e.
are
the
conclusions
valid).
We
will
hear
two‐three
 reports
each
class
with
your
date
assigned.
You
will
be
stopped
at
the
end
of
5
minutes
so
do
not
 dwell
on
details.
One
source
for
evaluation
reports
is
informalscience.org.
See
Schedule
for
your
 date
to
present.


 
 
 
 Observing
Visitor
Behavior
(Woodland
Park
Zoo)
 
 
 30

points

 
 Complete
at
least
20
observations
and
trackings
using
worksheet
developed
in
class
and
input
 into
data
file.
Attach
a
brief
reflection
paper
(three
pages
maximum)
summarizing
your
findings
 and
what
you
learned
from
this
specific
exercise
both
about
the
target
of
the
observation
and
 about
the
method
of
tracking..
Due
Jan.
19.
 
 
 Survey
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 40
points
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Develop
a
short
survey
or
questionnaire
that
includes
6‐10
questions
for
visitors.
You
may
 choose
any
topic
and
this
can
be
part
of
your
final
evaluation
proposal.
Pilot
test
the
survey
with
 at
least
three
individuals
that
reflect
basic
demographics
of
your
target
audience
(can
include
 friends,
classmates).
Include
a
one‐two
page
overview
of
the
evaluation
question
you
are
 addressing,
audience,
how
the
information
could
be
used,
what
happened
during
the
pilot
 testing,
and
your
own
reflections
on
the
process.
Include
IRB
compliance
information.

 Due
Feb.
9.
 


  • Morrissey & Owen 2009 • 4 •

    
 Interview
Questions

 
 
 
 
 
 
 20
points

 
 
 
 
 
 
 The
class
will
work
together
on
a
set
of
questions
that
could
be
used
as
part
of
a
front‐end
study
 for
an
exhibit
on
crows.
We
will
develop
the
questions
and
analyze
the
results
as
a
class
and
each
 student
will
complete
at
least
two
independent
interviews
with
your
notes
submitted
to
the
 Drop
Box.
The
results
of
our
interviews
will
be
used
by
the
“Planning
Exhibits
for
People”
class,
 as
they
develop
a
plan
for
an
exhibit
on
crows.
Due:
Feb.
16
 
 Evaluation
Proposal
 
 
 
 
 
 
 75
points

 
 
 
 
 Develop
a
proposal
for
an
audience
research
or
evaluation
study
about
a
real
scenario
in
an
 existing
museum,
zoo,
garden
or
other
site
of
informal
learning.
Identify
an
interesting
and
 relevant
question
related
to
visitor
behavior,
learning,
interest
or
other
outcome.

Develop
a
 specific
plan
to
answer
the
question.

A
strong
proposal
will
be
relatively
narrow
in
its
question
 with
all
activities
aligned
to
answering
the
question.
It
might
focus
on
an
exhibit
or
program
and
 might
be
a
front‐end,
formative,
summative,
remedial
or
other
type
of
study.
The
proposal
 should
include
the
following
components
(See
page
20
of
Diamond
for
more
details.)

You
may
 choose
to
do
this
assignment
with
another
student
with
approval
from
one
of
the
instructors.
 Due:
March
1
 


    1) Background
 2) Objectives
(What
is
the
question
you
want
to
answer?)
 3) Brief
review
of
related
studies
on
the
exhibit/program
topic
(if
proposing
a
front‐end


    study)
 4) Timeline
 5) Methods
&
rationale
(type,
surveys,
interviews,
observations,
mixed
methods)
 6) Strong
draft
of
one
instrument
to
be
used

 7) Dissemination
plan
 8) IRB
proposal


    
 
 
 Participation
 
 
 
 
 15
points
 Participation
includes
being
prepared
for
class
discussions,
contributing
ideas
and/or
resources,
 and
supporting
the
goals
of
the
class
and
the
learning
experience
of
your
classmates.
 


  • Morrissey & Owen 2009 • 5 •

    
 Grading
Scale
 
 
 GRADE
 Letter

 Percentage
 4.0
 A
 100
 3.9
 
 97.5
 3.8
 A‐
 95
 3.7
 
 92.5
 3.6
 
 90
 3.5
 
 87.5
 3.4
 B+
 85
 3.3
 
 82.5
 3.2
 
 80
 3.1
 
 77.5
 3.0
 B
 75
 2.9
 
 72.5
 2.8
 B‐
 70
 2.7
 
 67.5
 2.6
 
 65
 2.5
 
 62.5
 


    Scale
determined
by
the
UW
Graduate
School.
A
minimum
of
2.7
is
required
in
each
course
 that
is
counted
toward
a
graduate
degree.

A
minimum
GPA
of
3.00
is
required
for
 graduation.


  • Morrissey & Owen 2009 • 6 •

    Course
Schedule
 Winter

2009


    
 Note:
Please
refer
to
class
website
weekly.

Readings
and
class
activities
will
be
updated
weekly.