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    ACADEMIC YEAR 2017/18

    MODULE OUTLINE Certificate of Higher Education ECONOMICS

    International Economics and Finance FFEC006S4

    CLASS DETAILS

    First Meeting Monday 2 Oct 2017, 6.30-8.30pm Term Dates: Term One: October 2 December 11 Term Two: January 8 March 19 Module taught by: Dr Tesfa Mehari Please be aware that students should not be attending any classes until they have formally enrolled.

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    Contents MODULE DESCRIPTION ...................................................................................................................... 3 COURSEWORK AND ASSESSMENT .................................................................................................... 4 REFERENCES ...................................................................................................................................... 5 READING LISTS ................................................................................................................................... 6 Please read the Certificate of Higher Education Economics Student Handbook carefully for information and College policies regarding your studies.

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    MODULE DESCRIPTION This is an introduction to the political economy of the modern world, locating economic processes within the wider social and political context. Topics include: the world after Bretton Woods, landmark debates in twentieth-century economic thought and policy application; changes in economic structure and regulation; the previously planned economies and their transition to the market economy; industrialisation and underdevelopment in the developing world; globalisation, trade and global financial markets.

    The course begins with an overview of the international economic and financial framework in the period after WWII. It continues with an examination of the growth of world trade and payments in the Golden Age period and an analysis of the breakdown of the Bretton Woods framework in the early 1970s

    The main features of the new economic order will be examined including the role of international organisations such as the IMF, World Bank and the WTO. The rise and influence of MNCs will be considered. The importance of trading blocks such as the EU and NAFTA will be evaluated along with an examination of domestic and international policy options.

    The evolution and importance of global financial markets will be considered and the implications for exchange rate frameworks and currency crises evaluated including the Asian crisis of the late 1990s

    The Globalisation debate will be reviewed along with a discussion of the growth and development of Asia over the last two decades. Different topics may be considered in the context of different countries.

    Student Outcomes The course is designed to enable students to gain familiarity with theories and debates in contemporary international economics and finance including an awareness of the role of international institutions. Teaching Arrangements Teaching and learning takes place by means of lectures, seminars and class presentations by students individually or in groups

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    COURSEWORK AND ASSESSMENT NORMAL TRACK: Students will be expected to prepare essays for formal assessment and to undertake a compulsory in-class assessment. Assessment will consist of three elements: 1. Coursework amounting to 3,000 words in total to be made up of two assignments of 1,500 words each, to be submitted by weeks 10 and 20. These assignments will account for 60% of the total marks. The deadline for submission of coursework to the class tutor is the final class of the term (week 11 for essay one, and week 22 for essay two). Assignments submitted after the final class of the term will not be assessed without unless a mitigating circumstances form and supporting evidence has been submitted (further information see Student Handbook). 2. A compulsory in-class assessment of 1.5 hours which will carry 40 % of the possible marks. This will take place in week 22. There will be a central re-sit date allocated for those who provide evidence that they cannot attend the unseen assessment in week 22. 3. In-class participation is assessed on a pass/fail basis. Criteria include regular contributions to class (e.g. group-work, discussions, mini-presentations or other exercises), awareness of required reading, listening/communication skills. All assessment must be passed to be eligible for credit. Please keep a copy of all work you submit. You may produce up to two trial assignments if you wish which can be used for feedback. The course lecturer will give suggestions for improvement. These will NOT go forward for final assessment The in-class test will take the form of unseen questions to be answered within 2 hours. Your lecturer will advise you of the date of the in-class test which may be outside your class time. Failure and Re-assessment of a Module Re-take for modules where a student obtained less than 30% at first attempt. In this case the student will be required to re-enrol on the module, attend lectures and classes and retake all the assessment associated with that module. A module mark achieved under this mode will not be capped at the pass mark. Note that: students re-taking a module will be charged for the module. Re-assessment for modules where a student obtained between 30% and 39% on the first attempt. The student is not required to attend lectures and will only need to re-attempt any failed element of that module (in most cases, the examination). Note that a reassessment will be capped at the pass mark 40% (this is a new College policy and applies to all students in 2015/16). If an application for consideration of mitigating circumstances has been accepted and a deferral awarded by the sub-board, the reassessment may be submitted without penalty and the reassessment will not be capped at the pass mark. Further information about Alternative Assessment, Re-assessment & Re-takes, and a Compensated Fail can be found in the Common Award Scheme Regulations document located on the My Birkbeck website: www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/services/rules/casregs.pdf Please note students cannot re-sit in order to improve a pass mark. Courses often evolve from one year to the next, with changes in content and emphasis and it is your responsibility to keep track of any variations in the syllabus. If you require further guidance about re-assessments, please contact your Programme Director.

    http://www.bbk.ac.uk/mybirkbeck/services/rules/casregs.pdf

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    REFERENCES Please ensure that:

    you use appropriate footnoting or end noting, all references consulted, and all quotations reproduced, are properly cited, including where

    necessary specific page references, you include a full Bibliography representing the actual texts consulted you use texts that are written in English only

    It is essential that you reference sources correctly. If you fail to reference sources correctly, you run the risk of plagiarising. If a students work is proven to be plagiarised, this can result in the student automatically failing the course. The referencing formats below are widely adhered to in Economics:

    BOOK-1 AUTHOR SURNAME, INITIAL(S). YEAR. TITLE, CITY: PUBLISHER. EXAMPLE: Denoeux, G. 1993. Urban Unrest in the Middle East: A Comparative Study of Informal Networks in Egypt, Iran

    and Lebanon. New York: State University of New York Press.

    BOOK-2 OR 3 AUTHORS SURNAMES, INITIALS. YEAR. TITLE, CITY: PUBLISHER. EXAMPLE: Buzan, B., O. Wever, and J. de Wilde. 1998. Security: A New Framework for Analysis. Boulder, CO: Lynne

    Rienner.

    BOOK-4 OR MORE AUTHORS SURNAME(S), INITIAL(S) ET AL., EDS. (IF RELEVANT) YEAR. TITLE, CITY: PUBLISHER. EXAMPLE: Held, D. et al., eds. 2005. Debating Globalization. Cambridge: Polity Press.

    BOOK-SECOND OR LATER EDITION SURNAME(S), INITIAL(S). YEAR. TITLE, NUMBER EDITION, CITY: PUBLISHER. EXAMPLE: Calvocoressi, P. 2008. World Politics since 1945. 9th edition. London: Longman.

    CHAPTER IN (EDITED) BOOK SURNAME(S) CHAPTER AUTHOR, INITIAL(S). YEAR. TITLE OF CHAPTER, IN SURNAME(S), INITIAL(S), ED(S). TITLE OF BOOK. CITY: PUBLISHER, PP:. EXAMPLE: Murphy, C. 2002. Why Pay Attention to Global Governance?, in Wilkinson, R., and S. Hughes, eds.

    Global Governance: Critical Perspectives. London: Routledge, pp. xi-xvii.

    JOURNAL ARTICLE SURNAME(S), INITIAL(S). YEAR. TITLE OF ARTICLE. NAME OF THE JOURNAL VOLUME(ISSUE NUMBER): PAGE NUMBERS. EXAMPLE: Martin, L., and B. Simmons. 1998. Theoretical and Empirical Studies of International Institutions.

    International Organization 52(4): 729757.

    NEWSPAPER ARTICLE SURNAME(S), INITIAL(S). YEAR. TITLE OF ARTICLE. TITLE OF NEWSPAPER, DAY MONTH BEFORE PAGE NUMBER AND COLUMN LINE. EXAMPLE: Glapper, R. 2005. Transnational corporate recruitment and the welfare state: Pressing issues for

    governments and lawyers. The New Times, 4 Sep. p.4b.

    WEB PAGE SURNAME(S), INITIAL(S). YEAR. TITLE. PLACE OF PUBLICATION, PUBLISHER (IF ASCERTAINABLE). AVAILABLE FROM: INTERNET ADDRESS [ACCESSED DY/MNTH/YR]. EXAMPLE: Zuttel, F., and M. Hobland. 2002. References: Harvard systems. Powle, Burnemouth University. Available

    from: http://www.burnemouth.edu/service.html [Accessed 18 November 2002].

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    READING LISTS NORMAL TRACK: Purchase of some or all advisable (but not before the first class as we occasionally have to cancel classes) ESSENTIAL READING

    Krugman, P. R. and M. Obstfeld (2008) International Economics: Theory and Policy, 8th edition. London, Addison-Wesley. (Krugman)

    Salvatore, D. (2003) International Economics, 8th edition. New York. Wiley. (Salvatore)

    Todaro, M. P an