Integrating Visual Arts and Mathematics

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Transcript of Integrating Visual Arts and Mathematics

  • Presented by: Holly, Tejal, Carolina

  • AgendaIntroduction into the Integration of Mathematics and Visual ArtsClass will be divided into 3 groupsGroups will engage in 3 mini group lessons integrating Mathematics and Visual Arts at different grade levelsGroup sharing and discussions Final thoughts and questions

  • Objective To share our views as educators on the significance of integrating Visual Arts and Mathematics as a cooperative learning and holistic experience.In particular, the visual arts, which range from drawing, painting, sculpture, and design, to architecture, film, video, and folk arts (MENC, 1994, p. 33)

    In particular, the visual arts, which range from drawing, painting, sculpture, and design, to architecture, film, video, and folk arts (MENC, 1994, p. 33)

  • Whole Brain ThinkingWhen we integrate mathematics and the arts we provide opportunities for students to engage in whole brain thinking.

    Further, in learning the characteristics of and mathematics embedded in the visual arts, students can collaboratively engage in communicating, reasoning, and investigating (NCTM, 2000 & MENC, 1994)

    Further, in learning the characteristics of and mathematics embedded in the visual arts, students can collaboratively engage in communicating, reasoning, and investigating (NCTM, 2000 & MENC, 1994)

  • Evidence Supporting Integration John Dewey advocated that education be based upon the quality of experience. For an experience to be educational, Dewey believed that certain parameters had to be met, the most important of which is that the experience has continuity and interaction. Continuity is the idea that the experience comes from and leads to other experiences, in essence propelling the person to learn more. Interaction is when the experience meets the internal needs or goals of a person.

    The arts move learning beyond what is written or read (Bresler, 1996)

    The arts move learning beyond what is written or read (Bresler, 1996)

  • Evidence Supporting Integration Piagets constructivist theory argues that humans generate knowledge and meaning from their experiences.Professor Elliot Eisner, advocates that The Arts were important to varying types of cognition. He believed that arts brought about a deeper understanding of the world due to their interactivity.In Eric Jensens book Arts with the Brain in Mind (2001) argues that the visual arts seem to be strongest when used as a tool for academic learning (pg.58).

  • Standards and Expectations British Columbia Integrated Resource Document (IRP) For students to view Mathematics as relevant and useful they must see how it can be applied in a variety of contexts. Cross-curricular integration:

    Fine-ArtsPattern Line and FormFractions in rhythm and meter Spatial Awareness in dance, drama, and visual artsGeometric shapes in visual arts, drama and danceSymmetry and unison Transformations Perspective and proportional reasoning for mixing and applying materials in visual artsThe Ontario Curriculum DocumentMathematics Revised (2005).The development of skills and knowledge in mathematics is often enhanced by learning in other subjects areas.By linking expectations from different subject areas, teachers can provide students with multiple opportunities to reinforce and demonstrate their knowledge and skills in a range of settings. Also, the mathematical process expectation focuses on connecting encourages students to make connections between mathematics and other subject areas.

  • NCTM Principles & StandardsConnections Standard: Recognize and apply mathematics in contexts outside of mathematics. When students can connect mathematical ideas, their understanding is deeper and more lasting. They can see mathematical connections in the rich interplay among mathematical topics, in contexts that relate mathematics to other subjects, and in their own interests and experience. Through instruction that emphasizes the interrelatedness of mathematical ideas, students not only learn mathematics, they also learn from the utility of mathematics. (p.64)

  • British Museum Great Court Roof (1852-7), Robert SmirkeQuintrino, Bathsheba SculptureVitruvian Man (1487) Leonardo DavinciCasa Batllo (2006) Gaudi Artists Who Integrated Math and ArtSky and Water I (1938), M.C. Escher

  • Petyo Georgiev, Painting and Technology Artists Who Integrated Math and ArtOptical Art, Black and White Illusions Petyo GeorgievPaul Klee (1928), Burg und Sonne

  • Art & Culture Cave PaintingsTibet: Patchwork QuiltsIndia: Rangoli Patterns and Fabric Aztecs: WeavingEgypt: JewelleryChina and Japan: Paper sculpturesSpain: AlhambraFirst Nations: Totem PolesMiddle East: Tessellations

    Middle Times: Stone sculptors, armour, weaponary

  • NCTM (1989, 2000) and MENC (1994) *Dewey J, (1934). Arts as an experience. New York: Minion Ballet Publishers. Bresler, Liora. "The Subservient, Co-Equal, Affective, and Social Integration Styles and their Implications for.." Arts Education Policy Review 96.5: 31.Jensen, E. (2001). Arts with the Brain in Mind. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. United States: Virginia.

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