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Ingenuity
THE NEED FOR SPEED Multiple Funding Sources and Short Schedules Complicate New Department of Defense Projects
GIVE IT A REST Making the Case for More Freight Truck Parking
PROJECT DELIVERY Streamlining Airfield Pavement Projects Through Design-Build Delivery Method
NOW THAT’S WHAT I CALL SERVICE! Cultivating Customer Appreciation with One-Stop Services Building
MAKING IT LAST Corrosion Evaluations to Extend the Life of Critical Investments
LAND ACQUISITION Making Way for Infrastructure to Meet Consumer Demand
VIRTUAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION Harnessing the Power of 3-D Modeling to Save Time and Cost
2 Pond | www.pondco.com
Headquarters 3500 Parkway Lane Suite 500 Peachtree Corners, GA 30092
678.336.7740
Graphic Design Editor Candy Hedrick
GEORGE FRAGULIS, PE, LEED AP BD+C, PMP, CEM, BEMP Program Manager George Fragulis has 13 years of mechanical engineering experience providing facility condition assessments and energy modeling. George has designed numerous projects that include HVAC systems that utilize direct expansion, chilled water, hot water, steam, heat pump, geothermal, water source heat pump, and high- and medium- velocity delivery technologies. He has extensive experience in performing energy analysis studies and conducting life-cycle cost analysis for alternative system comparisons. George is a Principal at Pond and a frequent contributer to Ingenuity Magazine.
BOB AGRUSA, PE, PTOE Bob Agrusa, PE, PTOE is a Senior Transportation Engineer / Senior Project Manager at Pond. Bob is a seasoned transportation engineering professional with 32 years of experience, including over 25 years of project management and traffic engineering. Bob has worked in both the private and public sectors, including his tenure as the Transportation Planning Manager for Manatee County, Florida.
BRYAN SCHROEDER As Pond’s Director of Virtual Design and Construction (VDC), Bryan Schroeder evaluates, implements, maintains and supports the BIM/CAD technology software. This includes customization and adjustments to the BIM/CAD software systems for efficiency. Bryan has been in the design industry for over 20 years.
TIM FREDLUND, PE Tim Fredlund is a highly accomplished Principal, program manager and airfield civil engineer with 20 years of experience in service to the airports and aviation industry. Tim has been responsible for numerous large design teams and capital projects ranging from runway and taxiway reconstructions to new and remodeled, airside and landside facilities.
ANDREW LAWTON, PE Andrew is a project manager at Pond, and has worked with a wide range of natural gas clients across the Southeast. He has managed engineering projects including steel pipelines, infrastructure replacement programs, highway relocations, system modeling, corridor studies, and HDD/JAB design.
DAVID HUNTER, PE David is Senior Project Manager in Pond’s Corrosion Control group with 23 years experience in corrosion and integrity investigations. David has inspected over 200 structures, both above and below water, including over 150 bridges, piers, tanks (oil and potable water), ships, offshore platforms, even an offshore lighthouse. David is a published author, a SSPC Coatings Specialist, and is an instructor for both NACE International, and SSPC: The Society for Protective Coatings.
Pond Ingenuity Fall 2017 3
Contents Fall 2017
IN THE NEWS 16
THE NEED FOR SPEED Multiple Funding Sources and Short Schedules Complicate New Department of Defense Projects
04
GIVE IT A REST Making the Case for More Freight Truck Parking
06
LAND ACQUISITION Making Way for Infrastructure to Meet Consumer Demand
13 MAKING IT LAST Corrosion Evaluations to Extend the Life of Critical Investments
12
VIRTUAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION Harnessing the Power of 3-D Modeling to Save Time and Cost
14 SHOWCASE Advanced Manufacturing and Skilled Crafts Center
Midlands Technical College, West Columbia, South Carolina
18
Cultivating Customer Appreciation with
A
B
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D
Louisville District
IS S
U E
D A
B
GENERAL SHEET NOTES 1. REFER TO SHEET C-001 AND C-002 FOR GENERAL CIVIL
NOTES, LEGENDS, AND ABBREVIATIONS. 2. THIS SHEET IS PART OF A MULTI-SHEET SET OF
CONSTRUCTION PLANS AND SHALL BE READ WITH THE FULL SET TO BEST ENSURE PROPER INTERPRETATION.
SHEET LEGEND
G -0
04 .d
w g
PROJECT DEMARCATION OVERALL PLAN SCALE: 1" = 50' 0 25' 50' 100' 150'
PLAN NORTH
A
B
C
D
Louisville District
IS S
U E
D A
B
GENERAL SHEET NOTES 1. REFER TO SHEET C-001 AND C-002 FOR GENERAL CIVIL
NOTES, LEGENDS, AND ABBREVIATIONS. 2. THIS SHEET IS PART OF A MULTI-SHEET SET OF
CONSTRUCTION PLANS AND SHALL BE READ WITH THE FULL SET TO BEST ENSURE PROPER INTERPRETATION.
SHEET LEGEND
G -0
04 .d
w g
PROJECT DEMARCATION OVERALL PLAN SCALE: 1" = 50' 0 25' 50' 100' 150'
PLAN NORTH
SHEET KEYNOTES 1.
US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS LOUISVILLE DISTRICT PRELIMINARY SITE PLAN: PITTSBURGH C17
DECEMBER 15, 2016
LEGEND
JLSS169002 FUEL HYDRANT SYSTEM
JLSS160003 RENOVATED/ ADD C-17 FLIGHT SIMULATOR B-129
JLSS160007 RENOVATED/ ADD HANGER FOR C-16 MAINTENANCE BACKSHOPS B-417
JLSS160005 RENOVATE/ADD/ REPAIR/MAINTENANCE HANGER FOR AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE UNIT B-418
CONTRACTOR TRAILER LAYDOWN AREA
PROJECT 1 ---
PROJECT 3 ---
The Need
for Speed!
Multiple Funding Sources and Short Schedules Complicate New Department of Defense Projects
Hundreds of Department of Defense (DoD) projects across the United States have been backlogged for
the last five to eight years. Budgeting constraints, retiring staff, and contracting changes have slowed the release of these projects to a trickle, until just recently. The overwhelming need to update and maintain military base facilities and support mission changes has pushed the U.S. Government to begin letting projects. However, the new funding has a short shelf-life. For example, many projects that would normally require up to five years are given only two years to spend the designated budget.
This is the case for the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Louisville District’s Pittsburgh Air Reserve Station. The Louisville District received the green light to let dozens of projects that will enable the base to support its mission change from housing C130 aircrafts to housing C17 aircrafts. The approximately $130 million allotted for this undertaking is budgeted to be spent within two years, with the base being fully mission ready in April 2019.
In the past, USACE Districts and bases have had time to build up to
major renovations or new construction projects such as the mission change at Pittsburgh Air Reserve Station. These projects have also, generally, had only one funding source. Now, in the push to get all the renovations and mission changes addressed, funding is coming from multiple streams. Pittsburgh Air Reserve Station’s $130 million comes from multiple sources, including Sustainment Restoration Maintenance (SRM) funds, which support renovation and maintenance work, and Military Construction (MILCON) funds, which pay for new construction.
These multiple funding sources, coupled with the compressed schedules, set forth major contracting and project management challenges for the military bases and USACE Districts. With limited personnel, the Louisville District had to address the issue of how to simultaneously manage all the separate projects that must be completed in two years without slowing down the design and construction process or creating an administrative deluge for themselves.
One of the ways the Louisville District approached these issues was to enlist the help of both base personnel, to manage small projects, and the Baltimore District, which has offices close to the base. The Baltimore District can serve as the Louisville District’s eyes and ears on site during design and construction, therefore negating the need for Louisville District personnel to travel extensively.
For the larger projects at the Pittsburgh base, the Louisville District developed a streamlined contracting approach. Projects that overlap or are adjacent were grouped together under one contract, even if the funding came from various sources. This enabled USACE and base project managers to award and manage fewer contracts and receive only one set of specifications and drawings per contract rather than per project. While this efficient process reduces the administrative tasks for the USACE project managers, it places significant responsibilities on the designers’ shoulders.
Some design and engineering teams have been awarded contracts that contain several projects, many of which need to be conducted concurrently. These concurrent, adjacent projects are often funded by several types of money, and it is the designers’ responsibility to ensure that the work they do is compliant with the type of funding. For example, a pavement project funded with SRM money can include upgrades or fixes to pavement that has already been lain, but not the creation of new paved
Many projects that would normally require up to
five years are given only two years to spend the
designated budget.
Pond Ingenuity Fall 2017 5
1 2 3 4 5
A
B
C
D
Louisville District
IS S
U E
D A
B
GENERAL SHEET NOTES 1. REFER TO SHEET C-001 AND C-002 FOR GENERAL CIVIL
NOTES, LEGENDS, AND ABBREVIATIONS. 2. THIS SHEET IS PART OF A MULTI-SHEET SET OF
CONSTRUCTION PLANS AND SHALL BE READ WITH THE FULL SET TO BEST ENSURE PROPER INTERPRETATION.
SHEET LEGEND
G -0
04 .d
w g
PROJECT DEMARCATION OVERALL PLAN SCALE: 1" = 50' 0 25' 50' 100' 150'
PLAN NORTH
A
B
C
D
Louisville District
IS S
U E
D A
B
GENERAL SHEET NOTES 1. REFER TO SHEET C-001 AND C-002 FOR GENERAL CIVIL
NOTES, LEGENDS, AND ABBREVIATIONS. 2. THIS SHEET IS PART OF A MULTI-SHEET SET OF
CONSTRUCTION PLANS AND SHALL BE READ WITH THE FULL SET TO BEST ENSURE PROPER INTERPRETATION.
SHEET LEGEND
G -0
04 .d
w g
PROJECT DEMARCATION OVERALL PLAN SCALE: 1" = 50' 0 25' 50' 100' 150'
PLAN NORTH
SHEET KEYNOTES 1.
US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS LOUISVILLE DISTRICT PRELIMINARY SITE PLAN: PITTSBURGH C17
DECEMBER 15, 2016
LEGEND
JLSS169002 FUEL HYDRANT SYSTEM
JLSS160003 RENOVATED/ ADD C-17 FLIGHT SIMULATOR B-129
JLSS160007 RENOVATED/ ADD HANGER FOR C-16 MAINTENANCE BACKSHOPS B-417
JLSS160005 RENOVATE/ADD/ REPAIR/MAINTENANCE HANGER FOR AIRCRAFT MAINTENANCE UNIT B-418
CONTRACTOR TRAILER LAYDOWN AREA
PROJECT 1 ---
PROJECT 3 ---
CONSTRUCTION SITE ACCESS ROUTE *CONSTRUCTION WORKER PARKING LOCATED OFF-SITE
areas. Often the new paved areas are included in an adjacent project and are funded by MILCON, which allows for new construction.
To keep these types of constraints and logistics organized, the designers are required to submit additional drawing sheets and information in the division 00 and 01 specifications to explain the different project delineations. This helps the Louisville District ensure the money is being spent properly and that the projects remain within budget and avoid costly schedule delays due to mistakes.
Another challenge the designers face is coordination with the other designers’ projects that are happening concurrently at the base. Projects designed by one firm often abut another firm’s projects, which means constant communication is necessary to ensure the consistency and continuity of design. All the designers on site have coordination meetings during design review and continue to communicate between onsite meetings to coordinate their designs and contractors’ work. These meetings help all projects stay on schedule and, often, help the designers coordinate efforts to find cost and time savings.
For example, one firm is designing several pavement projects while another firm holds the contract to design the adjacent hangar. The design teams were able to coordinate base access and create an overall phasing plan to be included with the pavement projects, that the base used to create a temporary fencing project to contain this work. This enabled the majority of the work to be contained in a construction-free zone, which eliminated the need for deliveries and workers to enter through the base’s front gate. This is currently improving work efficiency and relieving base personnel of an increased workload and the inconvenience
of the many trucks and workers that would otherwise have to enter through the front gate.
In addition to coordination among the designers, coordination and communication with all the other project stakeholders also is critical. These stakeholders include not only the USACE Louisville and Baltimore Districts and base personnel, but also the Air Force Reserve Command, the local township, and the international airport where the airbase is located.
The Air Force Reserve Command is responsible for overseeing the project budgets, so it is imperative that designers and contractors initiate frequent communication to ensure money is being spent the way in which it is designated. This regular coordination helps avoid costly and time-consuming budget-related mistakes.
Because the scale of work is so large and the timelines so condensed, coordination and communication with the local township helps develop a positive outlook on potentially disruptive construction. Designers can help township leaders convey to residents and business owners that the work at Pittsburgh Air Reserve Station means that the base will stay active and help grow the local economy.
The international airport also is a crucial stakeholder in the work at the base. The airport has its own set of pavement, utility, and lighting design requirements that must be considered in all design work. The designers must coordinate closely with airport staff to avoid any issues with conflicting requirements.
These extra communication efforts not only keep all stakeholders informed, but also help make sure there are no surprises and that all requirements are met (not just the military’s).
As more DoD projects are being let, it is likely that most of them will be funded by multiple sources. Costs to bring bases up to mission ready status will continue to grow and these costs will be greater than either SRM or MILCON can fund alone. To overcome the administrative, personnel, and coordination challenges these projects can bring to the USACE and DoD, designers can work together to simplify contract structures, keep individual projects well-organized and take on the responsibility of extensive coordination with all project stakeholders. As has been the case at the Pittsburgh Air Reserve Station, designers will need to take charge, as these complicated multi-funded projects are likely the way of the future.
George Fragulis, PE, LEED AP BD+C, PMP, MP, CEM, BEMP | Principal, Program Manager, Mechanical Engineer
Designers will need to take charge, as these
complicated multi-funded projects are likely the way
of the future.
6 Pond | www.pondco.com
Give it a Rest Making the Case for More Freight Truck Parking
Every day we are constantly surrounded by other drivers on the road as we commute to work,
school, or shopping. However, we tend to notice these drivers and their type of vehicle only when one cuts in front of us, or we must deal with congestion. Case in point: Trucks, large trucks such as semi-tractor trailers, affectionately known as semis, seem to be all around us, taking “our space” on the roadways. But before you ask for the elimination of these vehicles from the roads, consider the impact of these trucks and other delivery-type vehicles to the economic vitality of your community and beyond. The world of freight, and trucks in general, plays an important role in our lives. It is safe to say that almost all of the “stuff” in our homes was transported via truck before it ended up in our home. In fact, this year, the trucking industry is expected to transport over 10 billion tons of goods throughout the U.S., which translates to approximately 70% of all domestic freight tonnage. 1
Despite the significance of the trucking industry, there are many critical issues facing this sector. One of the major issues that will be discussed herein involves truck parking needs.
Before diving into the truck parking issue, it is best to first understand the roots of this problem, which are tied to driver fatigue and related crashes. Over the years, there has been an increase of trucks on the road, particularly due to interstate commerce. These drivers are traveling through multiple states, throughout the day and night with minimal sleep, in order to make a delivery in a prescribed timeframe. Given longer hours of driving without rest, driver fatigue tends to set in and has been shown to increase crashes, particularly fatalities, along our public roads.
Due to this public safety concern for both truck drivers and the general motoring public, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, which regulates the trucking industry, has mandated a new policy for hours-of-service (HOS) for the trucking industry. This policy, which was instituted in 2013, allows a truck driver, as part of interstate commerce or long- haul transporting, to drive a maximum of 11 consecutive hours within a 14-hour period. Immediately thereafter, a driver
must stop and rest for 10 consecutive hours off duty, or in a sleeper berth, before being allowed to resume driving.2 Shorter hauls, such as intrastate travel (typically within a state) have similar requirements. For example, Florida allows for a maximum of 12 consecutive hours of driving before 10 consecutive hours of rest are mandated.3 Due to these mandate requirements, as well as the increasing number of truck drivers on the road, the need for safe and appropriate spaces for overnight or general truck parking for drivers to rest is becoming more critical — nationwide.
Surveys of current truck parking spaces around the country have revealed that existing spaces are located on both public- and private-owned property. For many years, truck drivers would typically use the interstate system to transport goods to their destination. Thus, the free interstate public rest stop areas have been, and still are, a major parking destination for truck drivers. However, since these facilities have become extremely popular with the drivers, especially given the easy access into and out of these facilities, truck parking spaces are at a premium during the evening and overnight hours. Drivers often have to plan their routes in order to arrive earlier in the day to ensure a parking space.
The need for safe and appropriate spaces for
overnight or general truck parking for drivers to rest is becoming more critical.
Pond Ingenuity Fall 2017 7
Due to this situation, as well as other factors, including congestion on interstates, avoidance of tolls on toll roads, and expanded shippers throughout a state, truck drivers are diverting their travels onto non-interstate/ arterial state roadways to deliver their goods. These alternate roadways, such as U.S. 27 in Florida, are becoming major freight corridors and have compelled the need for rest stop facilities along these alternate roads. U.S. 27, for example, is a major north/south roadway and, due to its location through the center of Florida and parallel to the major interstates (I- 75 and I-95), it is considered the freight spine of Florida.
To satisfy the truck parking demand on these alternate routes, larger private entities, such as Love’s Travel Stops and Pilot Flying J Travel Centers, just to name a few in the Southeast, have built facilities along these “alternate” corridors, miles from the interstate system, and still provide free parking. For example, in south central Florida, a new Love’s facility was recently opened along U.S. 27 in the town of Moore Haven, Florida near Lake Okeechobee. Also, Pilot Flying J has a facility located on U.S. 27 in the town of Haines City, Florida. Recent observations at this facility revealed near-capacity levels of truck parking during the middle (early afternoon) of the day, which is not even considered the peak period of the day.
To accommodate overflow of large trucks on a daily basis, Pilot Flying J has instituted a program allowing drivers to call ahead to reserve a parking space for one night for a nominal fee.
In addition to these larger private-owned properties, truck parking can be found at smaller “mom and pop” places. For instance, along U.S. 27 in the town of Frostproof, Florida, the “Orange Box Café” restaurant has catered to truck drivers by installing 10 to 15 designated truck parking spaces on-site.
Although the critical nature of truck parking demands varies from place to place, a sample of conditions can be summarized from the findings of a recent study undertaken by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) District One, which includes a 12-county area in the southwestern region of Florida.4 This study, which was completed in June 2017, identified approximately 45 existing and proposed sites currently (or to be) used for truck parking, whether overnight or daytime, within this District. These sites, which total approximately 1,300 spaces, were primarily located on public- and private- owned properties similar to locations previously discussed. Based upon a comparison of these spaces and the daily number of trucks estimated to travel throughout the district on major routes alone, which is approximately 27,000 trucks, it can clearly be demonstrated that there is a significant shortfall in truck parking in this region of Florida. Please note that studies of this nature are being conducted by other FDOT districts, as well as other states, because this lack of truck parking is a nationwide issue.
To help offset the deficiency in truck parking spaces, some public agencies like FDOT, are playing a major role in evaluating and developing potential solutions. In Florida, there are numerous cities and communities that have restrictions or prohibition on truck parking via local ordinances. Although
these ordinances may be appropriate for certain areas of a community, FDOT is considering coordination with city officials, as well as other pertinent stakeholders, including the private sector, to develop strategies to accommodate truck parking, particularly along commercial corridors where there may already be vacant or abandoned lands. Another potential solution being considered is the use of existing public lands for truck parking, such as expansion of existing interstate rest stop areas or vacant land currently held by FDOT along or near state facilities which are not earmarked for any development or use. This option will require extensive vetting by FDOT to ensure the appropriate use of the lands.
In summary, as freight movement via trucks continues to increase, truck parking demands will also increase. Although there is no clear “silver bullet” solution to this problem, public agencies, such as FDOT, are making attempts to coordinate with appropriate stakeholders in both the public and private sectors to locally develop strategies and solutions to this nationwide problem.
1 Iowa Motor Truck Association, “State of Trucking 2017: The Economic Impact of Trucking”, November 22, 2016, http://www.iowamotortruck.com/imta-news-center.cfm/ Article/General-Trucking-News/State-of-Trucking-2017-- The-Economic-Impact-of-Trucking/2016-11-22.
2 Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, “Interstate Truck Driver’s Guide to Hours of Service”, March 2015, https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/sites/fmcsa.dot.gov/files/docs/ Drivers%20Guide%20to%20HOS%202015_508.pdf.
3 Florida Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, “Intrastate HOS Rules”, Florida Statute 316.302, https://www.flhsmv. gov/florida-highway-patrol/specialized-areas/commercial- vehicle-enforcement/intrastate-hos-rules/.
4 Florida Department of Transportation District One, “Districtwide Freight Truck Parking Inventory”, June 26, 2017, http://freightmovesflorida.com/wp-content/ uploads/2017/07/District-One-Truck-Parking-Inventory- Study_Final-July-2017.pdf.
Bob Agrusa, PE, PTOE | Traffic Services Practice Leader
It can clearly be demonstrated that there
is a significant shortfall in truck parking
Public agencies are making attempts to locally develop solutions to this
nationwide problem.
PROJECT DELIVERY Streamlining Airfield Pavement Projects Through Design-Build Delivery Method
Aversion to the Design-Build construction methodology may be related to one of the most costly
phrases in design and construction: “This is how we have always done it.” Most of us in the airport industry cringe to varying degrees when we hear those words; but as humans, we are all creatures of habit and naturally tend to resist the unknown or unfamiliar. We mitigate risk, personally and professionally, by sticking with the “tried and true,” even though we know in our hearts that innovation and efficiency are not often found in routine process and procedure. It is this avoidance, in conjunction with a general lack of experiential understanding, that influences many to miss prime opportunities to deploy the Design-Build methodology.
Owners, engineers, and contractors alike often associate Design-Build construction
exclusively with complex projects such as new terminals, terminal expansions or o t h e r c o m p re h e n s i v e f a c i l i t y improvements. In doing so, we potentially fail to realize the tangible benefits that the method can afford for other projects. This is not to suggest that the Design-Build method is well-suited for any and all capital projects, but typically, it fails to make the shortlist when teams consider how best to bring airfield projects from vision to reality.
Design-Build procurement is nothing new to the architectural/engineering/ construction industry at large, having gained much traction in many market sectors during the past 15 years through varied U.S. government procurement systems. Generally, however, it still lags well behind the historical mainstay of government construction contracting- Design-Bid-Build. There are, of course,
countless cases over the years where the Design-Build method has delivered success for airport owners and their design-construction teams. But as with the national industry trend, these projects are a minute minority.
As it relates to airports, part of this, again, is founded in perception-the idea that Design-Build project delivery is more complicated and therefore less viable for the wide range of airfield pavement projects. There are also unwarranted beliefs that airfield Design-Build projects would somehow fail to meet the criteria for FAA Airport Improvement Program funding, and that airfield projects could not possibly benefit from the many advantages of implementing of a Design- Build approach.
These advantages, which are applicable across all project types, include potential
As featured in Airport Improvement Magazine
Pond Ingenuity Fall 2017 9
for accelerated procurement/construction completion and advancement of innovation in construction techniques. Other common benefits include time and cost savings through a combination of expedited mobilization, reduced claims and increased contractor responsibility toward delivering the defined project scope. In essence, a well-partnered and well-executed Design- Build project has the potential to save airports time and money, both of which are finite, critical resources when it comes to project delivery.
The judicious use of limited resources goes a step further, though, in that many contractors see this opportunity to save time as a means to improve their bottom lines, therefore producing mutually beneficial relationships. In addition, closely l inking design professionals and construction contractors can result in fewer design and construction issues,
Advantages include potential for accelerated procurement/ construction completion and advancement of innovation in construction techniques
mitigate schedule-busters and keep all parties on track for partnered success.
There are potential challenges to the Design-Build process as well, including a contractual disconnect between the project owner and its design professional, as well as increased urgency in the submittal review process. Both aspects can compound the uncertainty that owners may have about embracing the concept of a contractor-led project delivery process.
These challenges notwithstanding, the rewards for attempting a Design-Build del ivery far outweigh the r isks. Additionally, there is plenty of guidance about the process available within the industry, including research from the Innovat ive Pavement Research Foundation and Transportation Research Board. Established pathways for AIP-
compliant implementation are outlined by the FAA in the AIP Handbook and its 2009 draft advisory circular on Design- Build for airfields.
The Design-Build project delivery approach merits further consideration by more a i rports. Uncerta inty and unfamiliarity are best overcome by education, experience and for some, a leap of faith into the relative unknown.
Tim Fredlund, PE | Principal & Aerospace Program Manager
10 Pond | www.pondco.com
Situated on approximately 35 acres in Alpharetta, Georgia, the Customer Service Center at
Maxwell Road, formerly known as the Water Resources Operation Center, has evolved with Fulton County’s needs since its completion in 2016.
Originally, the project consisted of a new 45,000 square foot office facility designed to accommoda te fou r coun ty departments, including Public Works, Transportation, Parks & Recreation and Finance. In addition to an office function, the bu i ld ing was des igned to accommodate public affairs, occasional meetings of the County Board of Commissioners, and an area for a certified water testing laboratory. Also included is approximately 50,000 square foot of warehouse space, an 8,500
square foot vehicle maintenance shop, 4,000 square foot of greenhouse and plant staging space, and an oversize vehicle car wash.
Pond provided full-service architectural and engineering services. The civil engineering services included site planning, site layout, grading and drainage design, stormwater detention design, erosion and sediment control design and design of utility services. Extensive site planning was required to maximize efficiency, incorporate dissimilar functions such as business and light industrial, as well as preserve a protected stream which flowed through the site. The architectural and remaining engineering services were provided to develop the full design and provide construction administration of a two-story
office building approximately 60,000 square foot, an approximate 40,000 square foot warehouse for storing the water resources equipment, piping and other items as well as a four-bay vehicle maintenance facility with vehicle lifts and a pit in one bay. The maintenance facility also provides covered exterior space for a vehicle wash station. The building was designed to be harmonious with the surrounding residential area while maintaining the general look and materials of other Fulton County facilities to assist Fulton’s customers to quickly identify the facility with Fulton County services. The complex program provided plenty of challenges that were resolved through careful planning.
Since completion, the Customer Services building has been, and is still in the
Now That’s What I Call Service! CULTIVATING CUSTOMER APPRECIATION WITH
ONE-STOP SERVICES BUILDING
Pond Ingenuity Fall 2017 11
process of being transformed into a municipal complex to serve that region of the county, and Pond is working to assist Fulton County in this endeavor.
“The flexibility of the internal layout of the building designed by Pond has allowed Fulton County to house more customer focused departments than initially p lanned for wi thout any major reconstruction to the building,” said David Clark, PE, Director of Public Works, Fulton County.
By consolidating Tax Collector, Driver Services, Vehicle Maintenance and Water Resources, the county is saving operation costs and rent on multiple buildings. Also, the flexibility of the space for public meetings and functions provides opportunities for Fulton County to perform vital public outreach without inconveniencing residents with long drives to other parts of the county.
“As we strive in Fulton County to provide quality customer service, convenience and accessibility to our customers, this new building has helped consolidate many of our services into one location which will also save the county money. Over time, we plan to continue to add additional services at this new Alpharetta location with the goal of reducing the necessity of area residents traveling
downtown when they need to conduct business with Fulton County,” said Liz Hausmann, Fulton County Commissioner and Public Policy Coordinator for Greater North Fulton Chamber of Commerce.
“The citizens of North Fulton are happy to have the ability to one-stop shop for their driver’s license, car tags and other county services at the new Customer Service Center,” said Brandon Beach, President & CEO, Greater North Fulton Chamber of Commerce. “I want to thank Pond for the innovative and customer friendly design.”
Stephanie Hannum | Communications Manager
Now That’s What I Call Service! CULTIVATING CUSTOMER APPRECIATION WITH
ONE-STOP SERVICES BUILDING
This new building has helped consolidate many services into one location
which will save the county in maintenance and operation costs.
12 Pond | www.pondco.com
Pond’s Integrity and Corrosion Management team recently performed a corrosion evaluation on
coal silos for a client. Led by Senior Project Manager David Hunter and Technical Director Sasan Hosein, the team went onsite to investigate and form a solution for extending the life of the silos.
Coal is moved into the facility, ground in three separate concrete silos and moved via conveyor belt onto ships to transport around the world. During this process, coal dust, chlorides due to proximity to the brackish James River and near constant exposure to dust arresting misting can cause the structure to deteriorate. The Pond team was able to suggest and implement long-term corrosion control measures that would ensure the client would be less likely to disrupt or halt production.
“By evaluating and using corrosion control practices, the owner can obtain life extension of the structures, keeping the structure in- service for years to come,” said Hunter.
Hunter states that repairing or patching structures is not a solution that stops the reoccurring problem, but many companies do not have the specialized experience necessary to manage concrete corrosion. Corrosion mitigation on concrete is just one of the many unique services Pond’s Corrosion and Integrity Management department offers.
“I enjoy visiting sites and investigating structures to figure out how to maintain them,” Hunter said. “From the time you build it to the time when you replace it with something new, our department is there handling everything in the middle.”
David Hunter, PE | Senior Project Manager, Corrosion Control
“From the time you build it to the time when you replace it with something new, our department is there handling everything in the middle.”
MAKING IT LAST Corrosion Evaluations to Extend the Life of Critical Investments
Pond Ingenuity Fall 2017 13
Pipeline and facility expansion projects are always an exciting opportunity to serve new markets
and provide needed improvements to critical infrastructure. When it comes to planning for these efforts, many considerations are involved; from selecting a route or facility location to ordering materials to physical installation. However, without a place and rights to install, the time spent on activities and decisions is for naught.
While pipeline projects are sometimes able to utilize public easements and rights-of-way, in many cases acquisition of rights to install pipe or facilities on private property will be necessary for successfu l pro ject complet ion. Coordinating and executing rights to private easements can be a challenging process that involves many stakeholders, including property owners, legal representation, engineers, surveyors, ut i l i t ies, real estate agents, and construction professionals. The goal is to ensure a positive outcome for all stakeholders, where the project can be successfully completed on time and on
Land Acquisition Making Way for Infrastructure to Meet Consumer Demand
budget, and the property owners feel the process was conducted fairly.
Different types of easements may be required for different situations. In some cases, a utility may prefer to purchase property outright for permanently installed facilities. In other cases, a utility may elect to acquire a permanent easement agreement with a landowner. Furthermore, temporary workspace (or temporary construction easement) agreements may be executed to ensure adequate construction space for the project efforts. It’s worth noting that effort up-front to acquire additional temporary workspace often results in increased construction efficiency with regard to both schedule and budget.
It is important to begin land acquisition discussions as early in the project planning process as possible, as
negot ia t ions can o f ten requ i re considerable time and several design iterations to arrive at a conclusion satisfactory to all parties. Keep in mind that pipe routing and facility location decisions often need to be adjusted based on the results of land negotiations, and that these changes can cause a ripple effect throughout the rest of a project’s activities. It is always a good idea to plan for multiple alternatives to ensure project success.
Involving experienced professionals to guide the process and communicate on the utility’s behalf with property owners can help efforts stay on track; however all stakeholders need to be ready and willing to respond quickly when action or decisions are required to avoid delays.
Consideration should also be given to the construction phase of a project to ensure property owners remain satisfied with the process. Utilities and contractors should understand and adhere to any special conditions listed in easement agreements, and should seek to leave the property in clean and presentable condition both during and after construction.
Land acquisition can be a productive process if undertaken with care. Being receptive to property owner concerns and addressing questions in a timely manner are critical to success. Before you know it, the easements will be executed, and it will be time to get to work!
Andrew Lawton, PE | Project Manager, Natural Gas
Being receptive to property owner concerns and addressing questions
in a timely manner are critical to success.
14 Pond | www.pondco.com
Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) encompasses all the tools that Pond’s design and
construction staff use to create project solutions in a digital environment. The advent of 3-dimensional modeling has improved the capabilities of our staff to resolve coordination issues that were not easily discoverable when reviewing 2-dimensional design and construction documents. Since 2008 Pond has been using Building Information Modeling (BIM) software to develop building models with extractable Facility/Site Data to support Facility Life Cycle Sustainment from early design to building disposal.
At Pond, we use BIM and VDC technology to help us plan, design, coordinate, construct and manage our buildings and infrastructures in the most innovative, cost-effective and sustainable fashion. BIM is now part of our standard design workflow and quality control process,
providing benefits of design authoring, interference management (clash detection), 3D coordination, quantity and cost estimates, progress reviews, pre- visualization animations and rapid ease of design changes. BIM is invaluable in terms of its ability to provide our customers with a visual understanding of what our work will look like and how it will function once constructed.
USING OUR EXPERTISE FOR THE DoD
Pond not only understands the requirements of working on projects for the mil itary, but we have a deep understanding of the DoD BIM goals and objectives. Our team has ample technical competence and experience using BIM/ CAD Contract Language requirements on military projects, as evidenced by our list of DoD contracts. Our specialization in DoD work ensures we are extremely familiar with the requirements of the
USACE CAD/B IM po l i c ies and procedures.
Pond has implemented the DoD Quality Control Parameters into its routine QA/ QC Process and has reduced potential RFI’s and Construction Change Orders by executing the following in all our projects: Model Standards Checks, Facility Data Matrix Reviews, CAD Standard Checks , Des ign and Construction Reviews, Visual Checks, Interference Management Clash Detection Checks, and Over the Shoulder Progress Reviews.
VIRTUAL DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION Harnessing the Power of 3-D Modeling to Save Time and Cost
We use VDC technology to help us plan, design,
coordinate, construct and manage our buildings and infrastructures in the most innovative, cost-effective and sustainable fashion.
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IMPLEMENTING DIGITAL RESOURCES DURING PRE-CONSTRUCTION
More and more projects are implementing digital resources during pre-construction services to improve the quality of the finished product.
3D services include 3-dimensional geometries of design components along with data embedded in these geometries that describe the characteristics of these elements. For example, a light fixture would be modeled to represent the actual 3-dimensional shape of the fixture and the manufacturer and model number would be embedded data with-in the file for users to access.
4-D services provide tools that allow project teams members to document the schedule of construction into a digital environment. Navisworks Manage sof tware a l lows users to t rack construction sequencing of the project. Installation of a large mechanical units can be challenging, especially when they are larger than most circulation paths to their planned location. Construction scheduling can be used to determine what portions of the surrounding areas need to be constructed after installation of this large equipment. Therefore, eliminating the potential for damage or deconstruction of other components of the project.
5-D services include Cost related information. Adding Cost to a virtual construction models allows cost options to be evaluated in a more efficient manner and allow more stakeholders the ability to see how changes affect the outcome of the entire project.
6-D services include as-built deliverables. 3 Dimensional scans (also referred to as point clouds) was once too expensive to be used on most projects. Today it has become very cost effective and allows the team to capture existing conditions with 1/16” accuracy. In addition, new technology splices together photographs and the point cloud to give a complete digital representation of the existing building. Once a scan has been done, measurements can easily be taken of any item in the building (such as ceiling heights, room sizes, diameter of pipe, and window sizes).
The accurate capture of existing conditions also opens the door to prefabricating items such as pipe and ductwork to be shipped to the jobsite for renovation projects. This drastically reduces cost and time. This process is also the most accurate and complete way to document as-builts.
The industry is moving away from boxes upon boxes of record drawings, owner and operations manuals. Electronic storage of information is becoming the preferred method of storing a record of the building construction. With the advent of facility management software, building users can now track maintenance and usage information. The data used to implement this software can include all the virtual information provided during design and construction of the facility. Pond’s VDC Department will continue to expand our Virtual Design capabilities and provide all these levels of services to our clients.
Bryan Schroeder | Director of Virtual Design and Construction
Once a scan has been done, measurements can
easily be taken of any item in the building.
Industry terminology:
4D Construction Scheduling 5D Cost Estimating
6D As-Built & Facility Management
Pond in the Community
Concept review meeting for the Gabreski Air National Guard Communications and Security Forces Facility
Pond created a meadow in the city at PARK(ing) Day - Buckhead
The Pond team came in 2nd place at this year’s Chattahoochee Nature Center Eco Challenge
We are proud to continue to support the Atlanta Community Food Bank through volunteering and fundraising
Fastest Team Award for the Mayor’s 5K at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport!
Marketing Manager Kim Thompkins wins the SMPS Atlanta, Society for Marketing Professional Services Marketer of the Year award!
In The News
EXPERTS | Bob Agrusa, PE, PTOE Traffic Services Practice Leader
Groundbreaking Ceremony
EXPERTS | Jonathan Page, PE Senior Project Manager | Tranportation
EXPERTS | Kristopher Erwin, PE Senior Project Manager | Aerospace
EXPERTS | Doug Swift Construction Quality Control Director
EXPERTS | Lauren Blaszyk, AICP Planner | Transportation & Community Development
EXPERTS | Bahaa Ghuneim, PMP Program Manager | Oil & Gas
100 MEP Giants
Topping-Out Ceremony
New Contracts
Raymond-Pond Solutions awarded BMO Phase II Contract for Zone 3.
Pond awarded Schedule 871-7 (Construction Management & Engineering Consultant Services).
EXPERTS | Brad Jones, PLA, ASLA Senior Project Manager | TCD
EXPERTS | Clay Rokohl Senior Project Manager | Oil & Gas
EXPERTS | Benjamin Entrekin, PE CFPS Senior Fire Protection Engineer | Oil & Gas
18 Pond | www.pondco.com
Advanced Manufacturing and Skilled Crafts Center Midlands Technical College West Columbia, South Carolina
The Midlands Technical College Advanced Manufacturing and Skilled Crafts Center (AMSCC) is serving the industrial trade program and its participants as the new school year kicks into gear.
The AMSCC provides a sense of identity and is a destination for traditional and continuing education students pursuing accreditation or degrees in industrial trades. Originally a non-descript warehouse, the center was transformed into a landmark campus building on a modest budget.
The building features code improvements and new buildings systems infrastructure such as plumbing, HVAC electrical, telecommunications and fire protection measures. Interior changes such as exposed building components meant to serve as learning examples and glass throughout the design to introduce light and transparency, create connectivity and encourage hands-on learning for students. The pre-engineered interior appearance is minimized through use of natural-looking materials, ceiling clouds, luxury vinyl planking, and warm colors; textured wall panels create visual interest and a focal point for students.
Several of the programs, such as welding/grinding and building construction sciences produce loud noise. To minimize noise intrusion into standard classrooms and better serve these programs, Pond’s design focused on zoned placement of classrooms and proper Sound Transmission Coefficient (STC) ratings.
The overall design creates a programmatic and visual impact on the Industrial Trades Program and promotes collaborative learning through classrooms which simulate real-world working environments and enhances students’ training and marketability.
Outstanding Project Award Learning by Design, Fall 2017
Pond Ingenuity Fall 2017 19