Influence of the Gravity, Vacuum and RF on CLIC Module T0 Behavior 21.11.2011 R. Raatikainen

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Transcript of Influence of the Gravity, Vacuum and RF on CLIC Module T0 Behavior 21.11.2011 R. Raatikainen

  • Slide 1
  • Influence of the Gravity, Vacuum and RF on CLIC Module T0 Behavior 21.11.2011 R. Raatikainen
  • Slide 2
  • Introduction -Overview - Modeling steps - Supporting system -Illustration of thermal dissipations in TMM -TMM cooling concept Results Discussion Introduction -Overview - Modeling steps - Supporting system -Illustration of thermal dissipations in TMM -TMM cooling concept Results Discussion INDEX
  • Slide 3
  • Based on the CLIC prototype module to be tested in the laboratory, the TMM was modified to correspond with the CDR module design. The most significant variation and assumptions made to the lab module in the TMM point of view include: Vacuum condition, Differences in the heat dissipation, e.g. waveguides, Contact modeling; bonded MB AS separated using flexible bellows, Both operation modes unloaded and loaded were taken into account. The DB Q used is about half of the weigth of the lab mock-up magnet. Overview
  • Slide 4
  • The modelling of parts was created in steps including simplification in CATIA and importation into ANSYS FEA Modelling steps Original 3D model in CATIA Simplified geometry in ANSYS Simplification composes of suppressing geometrical details such as fillets, chamfers, holes etc. Simplified models are then assembled and prepared for TMM Boundary conditions (heat loads, contacts, gravity etc.) are applied in ANSYS pre-processing phase After thermal FEA, the results are imported into ANSYS structural (coupled simulation)
  • Slide 5
  • The RF structures are supported on the girders via so-called V-supports. As shown the module includes 4 fixed V-support and 4 sliding V- supports on MB side. PETS are fixed in the middle while the extremities has a sliding support. DB Q is mounted (fixed) on the girder. RF structures are interlinked with each other and the vacuum system via bellows. For the first time in TMM also the sliding has been taken into account. Supporting system
  • Slide 6
  • Illustration of the interconnections Vacuum and RF interconnections modelled as flexible joints
  • Slide 7
  • DB Q Steady-state maximum temperature variation of 5C for the magnet was considered (based on the current reference value) Illustration of thermal dissipations in TMM RF network Thermal dissipation of 11 W per waveguide was considered Summary of the thermal dissipations in both operation modes
  • Slide 8
  • TMM cooling concept Summary of the cooling boundary conditions and loads; HTC: heat transfer coefficient. The current cooling scheme is based on distributed water channels; 4 SAS in parallel and 4 PETS + 4 Waveguides in series.
  • Slide 9
  • Temperature distribution within the module. The highest temperatures are in magnitude of 42 C (Unloaded operation) and 40 C (Loaded operation). Thermal results Unloaded Loaded Units, C
  • Slide 10
  • Structural results RF load Axial (y-direction) deformation of the SAS
  • Slide 11
  • Structural results Vacuum load transversal (x-direction) deformation of the SAS
  • Slide 12
  • Summary Thermal results showing the main temperature and heat dissipations into water and air. Structural results showing the behaviour of the module in unloaded case corresponding the worst operation. Once the operation mode is modified, the change is seen primary on the MB side (DB side maintains its stability and no instant deviation is seen at micron level including the location of the DB BPM) Summarizing the components as vectors, the total deformations are about 76 m and 32 m for the MB and DB, respectively
  • Slide 13
  • Conclusion The thermal results show that during the heating ramp up the temperature of the module rises over 40 C. The AS experiences the maximum temperature variation. The water temperature rise is about 10 C for AS and 5 C for PETS. The axial deformation of one super AS due to the temperature variation is 40 m. The deformation due to the vacuum forces occurs mainly in the x direction. Deformations due to the gravity are lower than the ones caused by vacuum and RF. In reality the deformations due to the thermal effects should be considered larger. Variations in the environment temperature are not taken into account.
  • Slide 14
  • Extra deformation under gravity PETS vertical deformations are about 35 m SAS vertical deformations are about 30 m
  • Slide 15
  • Extra Stresses caused by the thermal load