Individual-based Models Three Examples. Presentation Outline Individual based models Approach Model...

download Individual-based Models Three Examples. Presentation Outline Individual based models Approach Model Structure Limitations Three examples – Calanus finmarchicus

of 29

  • date post

    27-Mar-2015
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    218
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Individual-based Models Three Examples. Presentation Outline Individual based models Approach Model...

  • Slide 1

Individual-based Models Three Examples Slide 2 Presentation Outline Individual based models Approach Model Structure Limitations Three examples Calanus finmarchicus (two examples) Adelie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) Slide 3 Georges Bank Miller et al. (1998,Fish. Oceanogr.) Examine the potential of Gulf of Maine and Scotian shelf as sources of C. finmarchicus Species is important component of larval diet of cod, haddock and yellowtail flounder Slide 4 Model Set Up Animal life history provides model framework Defined particular attributes for each stage used available data to set up parameterizations for simulating attributes tracked attributes in space and time Slide 5 Model Set Up Characteristics of life history stages Each requires data and functional form Each is tracked Slide 6 Results Verify that population structure and timing Slide 7 Results Spatial distribution of life history stages Slide 8 Limitations Assumed that growth and reproduction were controlled only by temperature Food quantity and quality important for C. finmarchicus growth not included Assumed light controlled emergence from diapause No feedbacks between zooplankton and environment Slide 9 North Atlantic Carlotti et al. (1998, Fish. Oceanogr.) Examine effect of C. finmarchicus on pelagic ecosystem Retained the life history structure different stages have different effects Slide 10 Model Set Up Animal life history provides framework Defined particular attributes for each stage Individual particles combined to form a population Lagrangian ensemble particles Multiple food sources varying quality in terms of lipid Slide 11 Model Set Up Connections ingestion, mortality, egestion Defined particular attributes for each stage Slide 12 Model Set Up Processes of particles based on life stage/age Equations testing for different situations (if, then, else) Slide 13 Results Ecosystem model, zooplankton particle model, zooplankton population model Estimated grazing control on blooms Slide 14 Results Ecosystem model, zooplankton particle model, zooplankton population model Estimated growth, reproduction survival Slide 15 Results Ecosystem model, zooplankton particle model, zooplankton population model Estimate biomass distribution Slide 16 Limitations Food quantity and quality important for C. finmarchicus growth focus only on lipid Include carbohydrate, protein somatic growth Limitation of numbers via Lagrangian ensemble particles Limited role of physical environment in zooplankton distribution Analysis of variability Slide 17 Adelie Penguin Chick Salihoglu et al. (2001, Polar Biology) Conceptual model based on life history chick Slide 18 Model Set Up Observed chick fledging weight relatively constant at 2.8 to 3.2 kg in spite of varying environmental conditions and food supply Chicks modify energetic and/or metabolic demands to attain an optimal mass that potentially enhances their survival after fledging Parent can modify the timing and frequency of food delivery to the chick to compensate for variations in food supply Slide 19 Model Set Up Observed chick fledging weight relatively constant at 2.8 to 3.2 kg in spite of varying environmental conditions and food supply Chicks modify energetic and/or metabolic demands to attain an optimal mass that potentially enhances their survival after fledging Parent can modify the timing and frequency of food delivery to the chick to compensate for variations in food supply Modify time of fledging Slide 20 Model Set Up Antarctic krill primary food supply for chicks Food quality varies with krill size Slide 21 Slide 22 Model Set Up Relate age determined from culmen length Growth based on Assimilation Respiration Track energy Slide 23 Results 88/89 89/90 Slide 24 Limitations Only one prey item fish possible prey Thermoregulation effects important Trade-offs in physiology imposed Role of habitat land and ocean Project climate change effects need to understand life history, physiology, ecology and interaction with habitat Slide 25 Circulation Model (3D and time) Circulation Model (3D and time) Atmospheric Tides River Discharge Temperature Salinity Temperature Salinity Larval Growth Larval Growth Currents Particle Tracking Module Particle Tracking Module Larval Behavior Larval Behavior LARVAL MODEL Temperature Salinity Temperature Salinity Settlement 330 um Settlement 330 um Modified Particle Tracking Module Vertical Velocity, Size, Temperature, Salinity Modified Particle Tracking Module Vertical Velocity, Size, Temperature, Salinity Post- settlement Population Post- settlement Population Model Framework Genetics Model Slide 26 Elephant seal Weddell seal Crabeater seal Animation 2007 Slide from D. Costa Slide 27 Animals and nutrient cycling Krill release iron from phytoplankton when they feed. Krill may feed in the sediments at depth and then return nutrients to the surface. Fish and whales have an effect on the ocean carbon budget Sperm whales can return significant amounts to the surface layer. Vertically migrating animals have access to nutrients in a deeper layer than phytoplankton. ( Slide from D. Costa ) Slide 28 Concluding Remarks Model frameworks apply across range of species Approaches needed to extend IBM results to population genetic variability Need habitat models account for variaiblity in habitat use and foraging especially important for large vertebrate species Approaches for linking food web and biogeochemical models Slide 29 QUESTIONS?