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  • Indiana Academic Standards for Mathematics – Third Grade Standards Resource Guide Document

    Page 1 of 21 – updated 7-6/18

    This Teacher Resource Guide, revised in July 2018, provides supporting materials to help educators successfully implement the Indiana Academic Standards for Third Grade. This resource guide is provided to help ensure all students meet the rigorous learning expectations set by the academic standards. Use of this guide and the resources on the web page is optional – teachers should decide which resources will work best for their students. However, all guidance contained in this document and on the website has been chosen to best support effective teaching practices and promote the Mathematics Process Standards. With an increased emphasis on content area literacy, academic vocabulary has been noted. Additionally, necessary vocabulary that should be prior knowledge has also been listed. Best practices should be utilized when teaching students academic vocabulary. Please see the Literacy Framework for examples of best practices.

    Examples have been removed from the document as they tend to limit interpretation and classroom application. Rather, success criteria, in the form of “I can” statements, have been included. According to Hattie (2017), success criteria is specific, concrete and measurable, describing what success looks like when a learning goal is reached. Additionally, success criteria contributes to teacher clarity, which has a 0.75 effect size! An effect size of 0.40 reportedly indicates one year of growth. Utilizing success criteria in the classroom allows students to monitor their own learning and increases motivation (Hattie, p. 57). It is important to note that the success criteria provided here are not intended to be limiting. Teachers may have additional success criteria for their students.

    Guidance around vertical articulation has been provided in the last two columns. Knowing what was expected of students at previous grade levels will help teachers connect new learning to prior knowledge. Additionally, understanding what a student will be expected to learn in the future provides the teacher a context for the current learning. This information is not exhaustive; rather it is provided to give teachers a quick understanding of how the work builds from previous grade levels into subsequent courses. The Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) math team recommends teachers further study this vertical articulation to situate their course objectives in the broader math context. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to reach out to the IDOE math team. Contact information for the Elementary and Secondary Math Specialists can be found on the website: https://www.doe.in.gov/standards/mathematics. If you have suggested resources for the website, please share those as well. Hattie, J., Fisher, D., Frey, N., Gojak, L. M., Moore, S. D., & Mellman, W. (2017). Visible learning for mathematics: What works best to optimize

    student learning, grades K-12. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Mathematics.

    https://www.doe.in.gov/standards/mathematics

  • Indiana Academic Standards for Mathematics – Third Grade Standards Resource Guide Document

    Page 2 of 21 – updated 7-6/18

    Number Sense

    Third Grade Standards Success Criteria Academic

    Vocabulary Looking Back Looking Ahead

    3.NS.1

    Use words, models, standard form and expanded form to represent and show equivalent forms of whole numbers up to 10,000.

    I can read and write numbers to 10,000. I can write numbers in word form. I can write numbers in expanded form. I can use models to represent numbers. I can show equivalent forms of whole numbers to 10,000.

    Standard Form Word Form Expanded Form

    Read and write whole numbers up to 1,000. (MA.2.NS.2)

    Read and write whole numbers up to 1,000,000. Use words, models, standard form and expanded form to represent and show equivalent forms of whole numbers up to 1,000,000. (MA.4.NS.1)

    3.NS.2 Compare two whole numbers up to 10,000 using >, =, and < symbols.

    I can compare numbers to 10,000 using greater than, less than, and equal to symbols.

    Greater Than Less Than Equal

    Use place value understanding to compare two three- digit numbers. (MA.2.NS.7)

    Compare two whole numbers up to 1,000,000 using >, =, and < symbols. (MA.4.NS.2)

  • Indiana Academic Standards for Mathematics – Third Grade Standards Resource Guide Document

    Page 3 of 21 – updated 7-6/18

    Number Sense

    3.NS.3 Understand a fraction, 1/b, as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction, a/b, as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b. [In grade 3, limit denominators of fractions to 2, 3, 4, 6, 8.]

    I can explain a unit fraction as a piece of something that has been cut into equal parts. I can explain the denominator of a fraction as the total number of parts in which something has been divided. I can explain that a fraction is composed of unit fractions. I can explain the numerator as one or more parts of the whole.

    Numerator Denominator Fraction Unit Fraction

    Partition a rectangle into rows and columns of same-size (unit) squares and count to find the total number of same- size squares. (MA.2.G.4) Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal parts; describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc.; and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. (MA.2.G.5)

    Express whole numbers as fractions and recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole numbers. (MA.4.NS.3)

  • Indiana Academic Standards for Mathematics – Third Grade Standards Resource Guide Document

    Page 4 of 21 – updated 7-6/18

    Number Sense

    3.NS.4 Represent a fraction, 1/b, on a number line by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole, and partitioning it into b equal parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the number line.

    I can partition a number line from 0-1 into equal parts. I can show that equal parts of a number line are fractions with equal value. I can successfully place a unit fraction on a number line.

    Partition Number Line Fraction Interval

    Plot and compare whole numbers up to 1,000 on a number line. (MA.2.NS.3)

    Express whole numbers as fractions and recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole numbers. (MA.4.NS.3)

    3.NS.5 Represent a fraction, a/b, on a number line by marking off lengths 1/b from 0. Recognize that the resulting interval has size a/b, and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line.

    I can partition a number line into equal size intervals. I can locate a fractions on the number line by counting the number of intervals. I can explain the location of a/b represents the size of the fraction.

    Fraction Number Line Interval

    Plot and compare whole numbers up to 1,000 on a number line. (MA.2.NS.3)

    Explain why a fraction, a/b, is equivalent to a fraction, (n × a)/(n × b), by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. (MA.4.NS.4)

    3.NS.6 Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, based on the same whole or the same point on a number line.

    I can demonstrate that two fractions of the same size are equivalent if they are based on the same whole. I can explain that if two fractions share the same

    Fraction Equivalent Denominator Number Line

    Plot and compare whole numbers up to 1,000 on a number line. (MA.2.NS.3)

    Explain why a fraction, a/b, is equivalent to a fraction, (n × a)/(n × b), by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even

  • Indiana Academic Standards for Mathematics – Third Grade Standards Resource Guide Document

    Page 5 of 21 – updated 7-6/18

    Number Sense

    location on a number line, then they are of equal value.

    though the two fractions themselves are the same size. (MA.4.NS.4)

    3.NS.7

    Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions (e.g., 1/2 = 2/4, 4/6 = 2/3). Explain why the fractions are equivalent (e.g., by using a visual fraction model).

    I can identify equivalent fractions. I can create equivalent fractions. I can explain why one fraction is equivalent to another.

    Equivalent Fraction

    Partition a rectangle into rows and columns of same-size (unit) squares and count to find the total number of same- size squares. (MA.2.G.4) Partition circles and rectangles into two, three, or four equal parts; describe the shares using the words halves, thirds, half of, a third of, etc.; and describe the whole as two halves, three thirds, four fourths. (MA.2.G.5)

    Explain why a fraction, a/b, is equivalent to a fraction, (n × a)/(n × b), with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equ