ImpOSCar2 Manual

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1 THIS MANUAL IS COPYRIGHT GFORCE SOFTWARE LTD 2011. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. NO PART MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT PERMISSION. ALL TRADEMARKS ARE ACKNOWLEDGED. New Features: 1. Aux Mod Section with comprehensive routing 2. Additional LFO 3. Improved LFO sync options 4. New Modulation and Controller Routing options 5. PWM control of all oscillators 6. Vastly improved Arpeggiator 7. Chord Hold and Retrigger from a single key 8. Controller Section featuring Channel and Poly Aftertouch 9. Pan Spread Modes and Amount 10. Mono and Poly Unison Modes 11. Unison Voice Spread 12. Portamento Spread on Unison glides 13. New Chorus Modes 14. Ring Modulation 15. External Audio Input with new separate FX version 16. Release Velocity Response 17. Multiple GUI Sizes (Small, Regular and Large) 18. Extended Patch Management 19. impOSCar to impOSCar2 Patch Conversion 20. Four Macro Patch Switches for storage of 8 Patch favourites

Transcript of ImpOSCar2 Manual

Page 1: ImpOSCar2 Manual

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THIS MANUAL IS COPYRIGHT GFORCE SOFTWARE LTD 2011. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. NO PART MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT

PERMISSION. ALL TRADEMARKS ARE ACKNOWLEDGED.

New Features:

1. Aux Mod Section with comprehensive routing

2. Additional LFO

3. Improved LFO sync options

4. New Modulation and Controller Routing options

5. PWM control of all oscillators

6. Vastly improved Arpeggiator

7. Chord Hold and Retrigger from a single key

8. Controller Section featuring Channel and Poly Aftertouch

9. Pan Spread Modes and Amount

10. Mono and Poly Unison Modes

11. Unison Voice Spread

12. Portamento Spread on Unison glides

13. New Chorus Modes

14. Ring Modulation

15. External Audio Input with new separate FX version

16. Release Velocity Response

17. Multiple GUI Sizes (Small, Regular and Large)

18. Extended Patch Management

19. impOSCar to impOSCar2 Patch Conversion

20. Four Macro Patch Switches for storage of 8 Patch favourites

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Table of ContentsOSCar to impOSCar2 3

Installing impOSCar2 4

Registration 4

Piracy 4

Thanks 4

Getting Started 5

Simple Patch selecting and editing 6

Saving and Memory buttons 6

Extended Patch Browser 7

impOSCar2 - in-depth 8

Oscillator controls 8

Wheels section 8

Glide controls 9

Mix controls 9

Aux Mod controls 9

LFO 1 controls 10

LFO 1 and 2 controls (additional) 10

LFO 2 controls 11

Filter controls 11

Envelope controls 12

Envelope 2 - Filter Envelope 12

Triggering controls 12

Unison controls 13

Pan and Spread modes 13

Filter Drive and Volume controls 13

Arpeggio and Chord controls 14

Edit Mode knob 14

User interface size 15

Effects 15

Chorus 15

Delay 16

Controllers 16

How To’s 17

Using User Waves 17

Using the Arpeggiator 17

Editing the .sup file 18

Using Duo mode 18

Using External Audio 18

Program Change window 19

Patch conversion from impOSCar to impOSCar2 20

Snapshot 21

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OSCar to impOSCar2

It’s normally a fairly simple task for us to write an introduction to a GForce instrument manual because each of our instruments is inspired by an original that we share a serious passion and enthusiasm for. As such, we’ll normally wax lyrical about an instrument’s history, character, sound and operating anomalies, while at the same time talking in reverential tones about the person who designed and created it.

Initially, the impOSCar2 introduction seemed slightly more difficult. We had already covered most of the historical ground in the original impOSCar manual, plus, in contemplating the journey from that instrument several questions took root.

For example, if we briefly left aside all things historical, was it possible that the philosophy behind the OSCar development somewhat mirrored the GForce dogma during impOSCar and impOSCar2 development?

To us, OSCar designer Chris Huggett was not just a technical genius, he was one of those exemplary Brits who built something unique and then had the courage of his convictions to compete in a market still fresh and exciting, but also a market increasingly dominated by the less fiscally challenged American and Japanese – In short, a market starting to brim with hyperbole and me-too acronyms.

Being British ourselves, we’re genetically impervious to hype, but could there be a parallel with the impOSCar being built with a slavish attention to detail by genius number cruncher, Jon Hodgson, as well as being the embodiment of our own spirit of adventure during the fresh and exciting days of plug-in instruments?

We know the original impOSCar was a tribute to those plucky Brits like Chris who, in turn, helped us define our own ethos, namely, one of a small, fiercely independent company, keen to operate on our own terms. So could it be that in the same way the OSCar appeared to put the pursuit of sonic excellence above calculated financial considerations imposed by corporate bean counters, the impOSCar was born of the same ideal?

After the M-Tron and Oddity, the impOSCar was our flagship polyphonic synthesizer, and it quickly became evident that the time and care put into developing it had paid off, revealing a synth oozing character and embraced by both the intelligentsia and the pundits.

Naturally there was some initial skepticism and we clearly remember standing on our NAMM booth while an equally passionate OSCar owner berated us, demanding to know why “companies like yours put GUIs representative of classic instruments on their instruments while they sound nothing like the originals?” He then begrudgingly took up our challenge to play and listen to it only to emerge from headphones twenty minutes, later grinning from ear to ear saying “Holy Shit....you nailed it!”

impOSCar went on to achieve the accolade of becoming the longest running Best Commercial Instrument Plug-In at KvR Audio, as well as winning Electronic Musician’s Editor’s Choice Award for product of the year along with Future Music’s Platinum Award, to name but a few. And while these awards were flattering and testament to the care and attention to detail that went into developing the instrument, it’s an instrument’s enduring usage that defines the great from the good. Thankfully, it’s undeniable that the impOSCar has been used in droves by everyone from hobbyist musicians to top-flight, international artists and has adorned countless hits. Hell, it even had it’s own catchphrase!

So here we are several years later with the impOSCar2 picking up the torch that’s shone brilliantly over the last few years. And having garnered so many ideas and good feedback over these years, we decided that we’d remain true to ourselves and turn a heroic update into an Olympic marathon.

Not for us the quickest and easiest route to market. Instead we made a conscious decision to take time to do the things we wanted to do, and to do them to the best of our ability.

So what’s new?

Firstly, Moore’s Law means that we’ve finally been able to add features that wouldn’t have been practical or indeed possible on the original impOSCar. In particular, 16 Note 8 Voice Polyphonic Unison – guaranteed to make an already bombastic sound even more powerful. Or how about a massive monophonic 16 voice detuned unison stack for those ‘Screams Like A Bastard’ leads and corpulent bass lines?

There’s now an additional LFO too, which together with some wonderfully musical and comprehensive routing options, including Osc 2 Pitch, independent or linked PWM, Filter Separation, Filter Q, Oscillator Mix & Noise Mix Destinations, significantly improve the sound creation possibilities.

A brand new Ring Modulator, containing both a Full Ring Mod and a more genteel half Ring Mod mode, means the impOSCar2 really does move into new sonic territory.

But that’s not all, not by a long chalk. There are now independent Pulse Width settings for both oscillators. Channel and Polyphonic Aftertouch, the latter providing magnificent expression for those fortunate enough to own a keyboard blessed with Poly Aftertouch.

There’s a vastly improved Arpeggiator with Pitch and Play modes. A sublime Chord Memory with retrigger from a single key, inspired by the classic OB8 synthesizer.

The previously mentioned and glorious monophonic and polyphonic unison modes are accompanied by awe inspiring Unison Voice Spread options, specifically designed for bathing in those lovely, wide sumptuous pads. There’s a superb Glide Spread where each unison voice glides at a slightly different rate (again inspired by the classic OB8). Additionally, there’s an assortment of Pan Spread modes, again, great for creating those huge expanses of sound. There are also new Chorus modes as well as keyboard response to release velocity when available.

Patch Management was one particular area where we listened to user feedback over the last few years and impOSCar2 now sports a totally redesigned and enhanced system that also allows the integrated conversion of original impOSCar patches and banks.

ImpOSCar2 even comes in three different sizes, so whether you’re on a laptop or a giant monitor, there’ll be less squinting and more tweaking.

Last but by no means least, we have a dedicated Effects version - probably the single biggest request since the original impOSCar’s sublime filters took the plug-in instrument world by storm. With this you can process external audio through the impOSCar2’s filters, ring modulator, LFOs, envelopes and effects.

Naturally, underneath all these enhancements, the original OSCar character and sound is still there but with these significant new features, the impOSCar2 really does build on the legacy of both the OSCar and impOSCar, pushing their bona-fide, classic, fundamental characters into fresh and exciting territories.

Whether it’s clean and clinical, smooth and creamy, warm and fat or just plain ‘bastard-like’, the impOSCar2 provides it in abundance.

So there you have it, from the code-alchemy to the GUI & sound design, impOSCar2 has been another GForce labour of love. Another instrument where the entire team put the pursuit of sonic excellence ahead of all else. For those of you waiting, we know it’s been a long time coming, but we think the wait will have been worth it.

However, we’ll leave the last words, not to ourselves, but to Paul Hartnoll of Orbital, an original OSCar and impOSCar user who was involved in impOSCar2 beta-testing and sound design and who stated in a recent Computer Music Magazine “I never feel I’m compromising my sound by using impOSCar2 rather than a hardware synth.”

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Installing the impOSCar2

The impOSCar2 installer allows you to install any or all versions via a single installer, one for Mac and one for PC (Mac installer shown).

Please follow the installer instructions, taking care to install the versions you require.

Initially, impOSCar2 will load in Demo mode. To use the full version, you MUST register your copy.

Registration

Click on the Demo version label. This will open the Registration window.

Copy your User Name and Reg Code from the email we sent you on purchase. Additionally, you can always send these details to yourself by logging in to your account on our website - www.gforcesoftware.com.

Upon successful registration, you MUST restart either the standalone instrument or your host application to enjoy the full version of impOSCar2.

Piracy

If you have already purchased impOSCar2, thank you. The revenue from sales of our instruments is put back into creating exciting products that we feel are different to those offered elsewhere. As users of musical software we’re not thrilled by having to jump through too many hoops to get things working and that’s why we offer unobtrusive copy protection for our instruments. However, we can only continue to do this if people support our efforts by paying for the huge amount of work that goes into creating each instrument.

Thanks

Engineering

Jon Hodgson.

Graphics

Ian Legge and Chris Macleod.

The Sound Design Team

Hans-Jorg Scheffler, Darren Price, Rick Smith, Paul Hartnoll, Phil Hartnoll, Tim Dorney, Davy Blakely, Sean Charles, David Gamson, Dogboy73, Billy Currie, Dean and Jarrod (aka I Monster), Marc Weerts, Richard James, Michael Kastrup, Paul Wiffen, Houston Singletary, Reek Havoc and Dave Spiers.

The Beta Test Team

Naughty G (aka Gaetan Schurrer), Anthony Robinson, Arp Laszlo, David Gamson, Marc Werts, Markus Schmitt, Matt Piper, PJ Tracy, Richard Hilton, Richard Evans, Alex Tepper, Andrew Schlesinger, Steve McNichols, Miles Egan, Andy Abernathy, Bruce MacPherson, Huston Singletary, Lee Groves, Mal Meehan, Matt Pearce, Mitch Chastain, Ned Bouhalassa, Peter Dudley, Roger Lyons, Ryeland Allison, Sean Charles, Tim Dorney, Tim Oliver, Vincent Bead, Darren Price, Phil Hartnoll, Crystal Method.

Special Thanks

All sound designers. The Beta Testers who actually filed a report. Urs Heckmann, Jim Bailey, Art Gillespie

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In order to get you up and running, here’s a walkthrough of the basic impOSCar2 process of loading, playing, editing and saving Patches.

Open impOSCar2 via your host application or as a standalone…

GETTING STARTED

Fig 1. impOSCar2’s default interface

This walkthrough will get you familiar with the basic format of using impOSCar2. More in-depth explanations start from page 8.

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After installing and launching impOSCar2 you’ll be presented with the default Regular-sized interface (Fig 1 - previous page). You will then be able to play the default patch (Fig2).

Click on the Save switch, name your Patch and save it (Fig 5). The default saving locations for user Patches are:

Mac: User/Library/Audio/Presets/GForce/impOSCar2/impOSCar2 Patches PC: C:/(wherever you select)

M1, M2, M3, M4 Switches (Fig 6).

These switches allow you to set up eight of your favourite Patches (2 x 4) and quickly move between them.

Please see page 20 for Assigning Patches.

Additionally impOSCar2 has a very handy Snapshot function which instantly saves a Patch. Full details on page 21.

To play other patches within the default bank you can either click on the Patch Up and Down arrows found within the Selected Patch window (Fig 2) or click and hold on the selected patch name and select from the drop down list (Fig 3).

Having selected a Patch you may want to edit it to your liking. As soon as you turn any Knob or click any Switch, you will notice a small ‘M’ appear next to the Selected Patch/Selected Parameter title. This denotes that the Patch has

been edited and it must be saved if you wish to use it in future arrangements (Fig 4).

Saving and Memory switchesSimple Patch selecting and editing

Fig 2. Default Patch shown in Selected Patch window

Fig 5. Save

Fig 6. Memory switches

Fig 3. Section of drop-down menu

Fig 3. Section of drop-down menu

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Click on the ‘Browser’ switch (Fig 7).

Extended Patch Browser

Three smaller windows are visible: Banks, Patch and Program Change. At this stage we are only interested in the Banks and Patch windows.

Banks Window

The Banks window (Fig 9) shows all of the impOSCar2 Banks (folders of sounds) stored on your system. Those Bank names shown in italics are the factory Banks and these folders are write-protected i.e. you cannot save your own sounds to these folders.

The Bank names shown in standard text are the User Banks. This is where your sounds will be saved.

Clicking on a Bank within the Bank window, will change the list of Patches shown within the Patch Window. (Fig 10)

You can also access Patches and Banks via the Extended Patch Browser window.

Fig 7. Browser switch

Fig 8. The Extended Browser window is revealed

Fig 9. Click on a Bank name… Fig 10. to see the Patches contained within that Bank

User Banks in standard text

Patches from selected Bank

Factory Banks in italic text

Page 8: ImpOSCar2 Manual

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Oscillator Controls

OSC1 Waveform Knob

Because the oscillators on the OSCar were digital they were referred to as OSC1 and 2 (as opposed to VCO 1 and 2). OSC1 contains the following waveforms: Triangle, Sawtooth, Pulse, Square, Variable Width Pulse, Pulse Width Modulation, Full Organ, Harpsichord, Strong Lead, Double Pulse, Gritty, Random, UserWave1 and UserWave2. Last, but not least, you’ll see an Audio Input option - this isn’t a waveform. but instead allows you to process external audio through the impOSCar2’s ring modulator, filters, LFOs, envelopes and effects when using the FX version.

The selected waveform is displayed in the blue screen above each waveform Knob.

NB: When selecting UserWave 1 or UserWave 2 for either OSC 1 or OSC 2, the waveform used will be those created and selected from the USER WAVES section (See Page 17)

OSC1 Pulse Width Knob (PW)

Provided OSC1 is switched to Pulse Width or Pulse Width Modulation waveforms, this knob applies an independent, fixed rate LFO to those waveforms in order to modulate them. Turned to the left, the PW Knob will have a minimal effect and will create a more hollow sound. As this knob is turned to the right it will create a thicker sound in relation to the increase in modulation.

OSC2 Waveform Knob

Features exactly the same waveforms and Audio Input option as OSC1.

OSC2 Oct Shift Knob

This allows you to change the octave position of OSC2 across a six octave range.

OSC2 Transpose Knob

Allows transposition range of OSC2 from -7 to +7 semi-tones.

OSC2 Detune Knob

This enables you to detune OSC2 against OSC1 in order to create ‘thicker’ or ‘chorus’ type sounds.

OSC 2 Pulse Width Knob

As per the OSC1 Pulse Width Knob, provided OSC2 is switched to Pulse Width or Pulse Width Modulation waveforms, this knob applies an independent, fixed rate LFO to those waveforms. Turned to the left, the PW Knob will have a minimal effect and will create a more hollow sound. As this is turned further to the right it will create a ‘thicker’ sound as a result of the increase in modulation.

Octave Transpose LEDs

Clicking on the red LED’s will transpose both Oscillators globally. Use this in conjunction with the OSC2 transpose Knobs to create relative transpositions.

impOSCar2 - In DepthHere we dig deeper into the impOSCar2’s features and how to get the very best from the instrument.

Wheels Section

Bend Knob

This allows you to set the semi-tone range that the pitch-bend wheel, on your master keyboard, has on the impOSCar2. You can select any amount between 0 (off) and 24 semi-tones (two octaves).

Mod - Pitch Amount Knob

This Knob allows you to choose the amount of pitch modulation introduced by either the Modulation Wheel, Aftertouch or Expression. Both + and - pitch modulation settings are available, with a zero setting at ‘12 o’clock’. The speed of this modulation is governed by the LFO rate.

Pitch Mod Source Selector

Click on this to select control of Pitch Modulation via the modulation wheel, aftertouch orexpression (Alt+Click) – the latter, expression, being perfect for use with Continuous Controller footpedals.

Modulation Source colour coding.

White = Mod Wheel Red = Aftertouch Yellow = Expression (ALT+Click)

Mod - Filter Amount Knob

Similar to the aforementioned Pitch Mod function, only this time the modulation wheel of your master keyboard will affect the filter amount. Again the speed of filter modulation is determined by the LFO rate.

Filter Mod Source Selector

Click on this to select control of Filter Modulation via your modulation wheel, aftertouch or expression (Alt+Click).

White = Mod Wheel Red = Aftertouch Yellow = Expression (ALT+Click)

Mod - Aux Amount Knob

Similar to the aforementioned Pitch Mod function, except this time the modulation wheel of your master keyboard will affect the function selected by the Aux Mod Destination.

Aux Mod Source Selector

Click on this to select control of the Aux Modulation setting via your modulation wheel, aftertouch or expression (Alt+Click).

White = Mod Wheel Red = Aftertouch Yellow = Expression (ALT+Click)

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Glide Controls

Glide Type Knob

impOSCar2 contains an exceptionally comprehensive set of Glide options:

Normal: Simple portamento where the time between each note played is governed by the Portamento Time Knob (underneath). In the first three ‘unfixed’ modes the Glide Time is the time taken to slide one octave, which means that the larger the interval the longer the glide time.

Auto: The same as Normal mode except that in Monophonic mode glide is activated only between notes that are held.

Gliss: The Glissando mode is similar to Normal but instead of a smooth transition between each note you actually hear the semi-tone steps.

Normal - Fixed: As per the previous Normal mode except that in Normal Fixed mode the glide time is the time taken between any two notes, no matter how large the interval.

Auto - Fixed: As per the previous Auto mode whereby portamento is only triggered by legato notes, except that the glide time is the time taken between any two notes, no matter how large the interval.

Gliss - Fixed: As per the previous Glissando mode except that in this case the glide time is the time taken between any two notes, no matter how large the interval.

When using Unison Mode, the glide also has the added feature of a ‘spread’ or ‘lag’ whereby each voice glides at a slightly different rate. This is perfect for huge cascading glides. There are two setting for this, Mild and Wild. See Unison Controls for more details. (Page 13)

Mix Controls

Osc Balance KnobDetermines the balance between OSC1 and OSC2.

Ring Modulation Selection LEDsClick these to select between Off (left LED), Half (centre LED) or Full (right LED) Ring Modulation modes.

When ring modulation is activated the OSC Balance Knob controls the balance between OSC1 and OSC2/Ring Modulator: Fully anti-clockwise is only Oscillator 1. Centre will now be a 50/50 mix of Oscillator 1/Oscillator 2 Ring Mod. Fully clockwise is only Oscillator 2 and Ring Mod.

Use this Balance Knob together with the OSC2 Pitch Controls (Transpose, Octave Shift and Fine Tune) to create sounds from subtle to extreme mixes of Ring Modulation. (See Using External Audio on page 27 for details on using Ring Mod with external audio sources).

Noise Balance KnobAlters the balance between the combined tones of OSC1 and 2 and the selected noise generator.

Noise Type SelectorClicking on this Switch allows the selection of White or Pink Noise types.

White Noise: This contains all the frequencies in the audio spectrum in equal amounts.

Pink Noise: Musically more useful than White Noise because it contains equal energies of each frequency and as a result doesn’t sound too low and ‘rumbling’ or high and ‘hissy’. This makes it ideal for wind and thunder noises or adding ‘grit’ to drum sounds or even staccato pads.

By clicking the Noise Type Selector with the Alt key held you can select an external Audio Input as a noise source too.

Noise Selector colour coding.

White = Mod Wheel Pink = Aftertouch Blue (AI) = External Audio Input (Alt+Click)

NB: Being able to route an external audio source to the Noise Selector is dependent on your host application’s capabilities. Not all hosts will be compatible with this feature.

Aux Mod Controls

A new addition to impOSCar2, dramatically expanding the modulation and routing possibilities over the original impOSCar.

Aux Mod Destination Knob

Selects between Osc2 Pitch, Osc 1 Pulse Width, Osc 2 Pulse Width, Osc1 and 2 Pulse Width, Filter Separation, Filter Q, Osc 1 and 2 Mix and Noise Mix.

Aux Mod Env Selector

Clicking this Switch selects the source Envelope which is colour coded as follows:

Blue = Envelope 1 (Amp Envelope) Green = Envelope 2 (Filter Envelope)

Aux Mod Env Amount Knob

This allows control over the selected source envelope when the appropriate settings are activated via the Aux Mod Destination Knob:

Pitch Up to + or – 7 semi-tones.

Pulse Width Up to + or - 50%.

Filter Separation Up to + or - 24 semi-tones.

Filter Q Up to + or - 1 Q

Oscillator Mix Up to + or - 100%

Noise Mix Up to + or - 100%

Aux Mod Sum Switch

This changes the Env Amount and LFO Amount from summing to multiplying. By selecting Multiplying you can modulate the LFO amount with the Env Amount.

Aux Mod to LFO1 and 2 Selector.

Using the LEDs you can select the routing of the Aux Mod Section to either LFO1 or LFO2 or a combination of both.

The available settings are LFO1 100%, LFO1 75% and LFO2 25%, LFO1 and LFO2 50%, LFO1 25% and LFO2 75% or LFO2 100%

Aux Mod LFO Amount Knob.

Determines the amount of LFO applied (with both positive and negative values) to the selected Aux Destination.

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LFO 1 Controls

In its initial setting LFO 1 acts as a pitch LFO and LFO 2 as a filter LFO.

With the Aux Mod section it’s possible to override the initial settings in several ways. For example, it’s possible to have LFO 1 assigned to modulate between Oscillators 1 and 2 while still retaining LFO 2 for filter modulation.

LFO 1 Waveform Knob

LFO waveforms include: Triangle, Triangle 3 Step, Triangle 5 Step, Sawtooth, Sawtooth 4 Step, Sawtooth 8 Step, Square, Pattern 1, Pattern 2, Guitar (a positive only triangle wave, with vibrato only above the key pitch), Filter Env and Random.

LFO 1 Rate Knob

This governs the speed of the LFO.

There are four basic LFO modes that are dependent on the position of the LFO Sync Knob. For example, with the Sync Knob set to ‘Free’ the speed is given in Hz, but if the Sync Knob is set to ‘MIDI’ the value is displayed in Cycles Per Bar. See LFO Sync Knob for more details on sync modes (below).

LFO 1 Intro Knob

This allows you to delay the start of the LFO after playing a note. The LFO delay or ‘intro’ time is given in seconds.

LFO 1 Sync Knob

Provides four sync modes, each with various options, under which the LFO can operate:

Free: Freerun mode providing no sync between polyphonic voices. This mode is great for swirling chords because of the independent rate at which each voice modulates.

Free RT: As per the above Free-mode except that the LFO restarts with each note-on event.

Lock: Selecting this locks all polyphonic voices in sync with each other.

Lock RT: As per the above Lock-mode except that the LFO restarts with each note-on event.

Clock: Synchronizes the LFO to the main clock, which may itself by synchronised to MIDI in order to create LFO effects that match the arpeggiator.

Clock RT: As per the above Clock-mode except that the LFO restarts with each note-on event.

MIDI: Synchronised to MIDI, bypassing the main clock.

MIDI RT: As per the above MIDI-mode except that the LFO restarts with each note-on event.

MIDI RT 2Br: As per the above MIDI-mode except that the LFO restarts with each note-on event and the cycle of the selected LFO Rate is over 2 Bars.

MIDI RT 3Br: As per the above MIDI-mode except that the LFO restarts with each note-on event and the cycle of the selected LFO Rate is over 3 Bars.

MIDI RT 4Br: As per the above MIDI-mode except that the LFO restarts with each note-on event and the cycle of the selected LFO Rate is over 4 Bars.

LFO 1 and LFO 2 Controls

Envelope Pitch Source Switch

Assigns either Envelope 1 or 2 as the pitch source.

Pitch Mod Sum Switch

This changes the Env Pitch Amount and Pitch Mod Amount from summing to multiplying. Using multiplying you can modulate the Pitch Amount with the Env Amount.

ENV Pitch Knob

Using this knob in conjunction with the Envelope Pitch Source Switch it’s possible to use the shape of Envelope 1 or 2 to make changes to the pitch of your sound with both positive and negative values of up to +7 or -7 semi-tones.

LFO Pitch Modulation Knob

This knob determines the amount of pitch modulation or vibrato applied to a sound. This is directly related to the LFO Waveform shape, the LFO rate and the LFO selected by the LEDs above. These LEDs can be used to select varying ratios of LFO 1 and 2 as follows: LFO1 100%, LFO1 75% and LFO2 25%, LFO1 and LFO2 50%, LFO1 25% and LFO2 75% or LFO2 100%

This parameter also has both positive and negative values with values of up to +7 or -7 semi-tones.

Summing

Multplying

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LFO 2 Controls

LFO 2 Waveform Knob

LFO waveforms include: Triangle, Triangle 3 Step, Triangle 5 Step, Sawtooth, Sawtooth 4 Step, Sawtooth 8 Step, Square, Pattern1, Pattern 2, Guitar (a positive only triangle wave, with vibrato only above the key pitch), Filter Env and Random.

LFO Filter Amount Knob

Controls the depth of the LFO and, in turn, the effect the selected LFO has on the filter. This parameter has both negative and positive values and is directly related to the selected LFO Waveform shape, the LFO rate and the LFO selected by the LEDs above. The LEDs can be used to select varying ratios of LFOs 1 and 2 routing as follows:

LFO1 100%, LFO1 75% and LFO2 25%, LFO1 and LFO2 50%, LFO1 25% and LFO2 75% or LFO2 100%

LFO 2 Rate Knob

This governs the speed of LFO 2 and, as per LFO 1, there are four basic LFO modes that are determined by the position of the LFO Sync knob (See LFO 1 Rate Knob and LFO 1 Sync Knob for details page 10)

LFO 2 Intro Knob

This allows you to delay the start of the LFO after playing a note. The LFO delay or ‘intro’ time is given in seconds.

LFO 2 Sync Knob

Provides four sync modes, each with various options, under which the LFO can operate. For full details of these modes please see LFO 1 Sync knob.

Filter ControlsThe OSCar’s filter was unique, consisting of two 12dB filters, which could be combined in series to create 24dB filtering. The filtering modes were LPF, BPF and HPF with a ‘no track’ option. We have removed the ‘no track’ option as it’s possible to achieve the same using the KEYB TRACK Knob. However, impOSCar2 has expanded on these original modes by adding several more that were only possible to realise on the original instrument with the careful use of a soldering iron.

Filter Type KnobSelects from the following filter options:

Low-Pass 24dB: The two 12dB filters are combined in series to allow the low frequencies to pass through while filtering the high frequencies out.

Band-Pass 24dB: The two 12dB filters are combined in series allowing the selected band of frequencies to pass through while filtering out anything outside that range. NB: In this mode the two filters are arranged as one lowpass and one highpass, not 2 bandpass.

High-Pass 24dB: Again the two 12dB filters are combined in series allowing the high frequencies to pass through while filtering out the low frequencies.

Low-Pass 2-Pole: The two filters are arranged in parallel allowing the low frequencies to pass through while filtering out the high frequencies. In this mode, when the Separation is set to zero, it’s the same as a normal 12dB filter. However when it’s set to anything other than zero you get two resonant peaks and cut-off points.

Band-Pass 2-Pole: The two 12dB filters are combined in parallel allowing the selected band of frequencies to pass through while filtering out anything outside that range. Again, when the Separation is set to zero it’s the same as a single 12dB filter. However when it’s set to anything other than zero you get two resonant peaks and cut-off points

High-Pass 2-Pole: The two 12dB filters are combined in parallel allowing the high frequencies to pass through while filtering out the low frequencies. Again, when the Separation is set to zero it’s the same as a single 12dB filter. However when it’s set to anything other than zero you get two resonant peaks and cut-off points

Low-Pass//Band-Pass: The Lowpass and Bandpass filters are arranged in parallel. In this mode with zero or higher Separation you get a notch or band-reject effect.

Low-Pass//High-Pass: Similar to the above but the Lowpass and Highpass filters are arranged in parallel.

Band Pass//High-Pass: Again, similar to the previous two filter modes only this time the Bandpass and Highpass filters are arranged in parallel.

Q KnobMore commonly referred to as Resonance. A narrow band of frequencies, boosted at the cut-off point.

Separation KnobThis takes the two 12dB filters and allows independent control of their cut-off frequencies. When used with either the 4 or 2-pole filter modes it’s possible to separate the filters by up to 24 semi-tones.

In the first six filter modes, no Separation takes place when the knob is turned fully to the left.

In the first three multi-modes, no Separation takes place when the knob is at ‘12 o’clock’.

Frequency KnobThe Frequency Knob if the knob you’ll use to filter out (or attenuate) ceertain frequencies depending on the mode set by the Filter Type Knob. For Example, if you have a Low Pass Filter selected, moving the Frequency Knob counter-clockwise will attenuate high frequencies while allowing the lower frequencies to pass though. Conversely, if you have a High Pass Filter selected moving the knob counter clockwise will attenuate the lower frequencies while still allowing the high frequencies to pass through.

Filter Env Amount KnobDetermines the filter amount applied by either Envelopes 1 or 2 when selected via the Filter Envelope Source Switch. This knob also works in positive and negative modes.

Filter Envelope Source SwitchChanges the filter source envelope from Envelope 1 to Envelope 2. Clicking the switch changes the source and is colour coded as follows:

Blue = Envelope 1 Green = Envelope 2

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Envelope Controls

Envelope 1 - Amplitude Envelope

In its default setting Envelope 1 is used as an amplitude envelope and remains separate to Envelope 2 - the Filter Envelope. However, it’s possible to use Envelope 1 as a Filter Envelope by changing the switch to the top left of the Filter Amount Knob from Green to Blue.

Env 1 Attack Knob

Used to alter the attack time of the amplitude ADSR Envelope Generator between 0.001 and 15 seconds.

Env 1 Decay Knob

Used to alter the decay time of the amplitude ADSR Envelope Generator between 0.001 and 30 seconds.

Env 1 Sustain Knob

Used to alter the sustain level of the amplitude ADSR Envelope Generator between 0% and 100%.

Env 1 Release Knob

Used to alter the release time of the amplitude ADSR Envelope Generator between 0.001 and 60 seconds.

Envelope 2 - Filter Envelope

Env 2 Delay Knob

This applies a Delay of up to 2 seconds to the start of the Filter Envelope and is useful for creating those long, evolving sounds.

Env 2 Attack Knob

Used to alter the Attack time of the filter ADSR Envelope Generator between 0.001 and 30 seconds.

Env 2 Decay Knob

Used to alter the Decay time of the filter ADSR Envelope Generator between 0.001 and 30 seconds.

Env 2 Sustain Knob

Used to alter the Sustain level of the filter ADSR Envelope Generator between 0% and 100%.

Env 2 Release Knob

Used to alter the Release time of the filter ADSR Envelope Generator between 0.001 and 60 seconds.

Triggering Controls

Keyboard Triggering Knob

impOSCar2 has several triggering modes:

SINGLE: Using this mode the envelopes are only retriggered once their cycle is complete. When playing Legato lines, the first note triggers the envelope and all successive notes are heard at sustain level.

MULTI: Here, the envelopes are retriggered each time a note is played without waiting for the envelope cycle to finish. Unlike Single trigger, when playing Legato lines, all notes will retrigger the envelope.

RPT 1: Used in conjunction with the Tempo knob, RPT1 activates the retriggering of the Amplitude Envelope or Env1.

RPT 2: Similar to the RPT1 function, RPT2 activates the retriggering of the Filter Envelope (Env2) in accordance with the selected tempo.

RPT 1+2: As you would expect this activates the retriggering of both the Amplitude and Filter Envelope (Env1 & Env2) in accordance with the tempo control.

Tempo Knob

Controls the tempo of either the Arpeggio or the retriggering of the envelopes as described previously. The tempo of impOSCar2 can be clocked internally or synchronised to an external source. If set to internal clock the Tempo rate is shown as BPM. If set to external clock the Tempo rate is shown as Beats Per Bar.

Gate Time Knob

When using any of the aforementioned RPT triggering options to also alter the Gate Time of either or both envelopes, the default Gate Time setting is 50% and moving the knob to the right increases the Gate Time whereas moving the knob to the left shortens the Gate Time. For optimum Gate Time control make sure the Release Times of each envelope are not too long.

Function Knob

The function Knob selects from various monophonic or polyphonic modes:

MONO: Selects monophonic mode, ideal for lead or bass lines.

DUO: Duophonic mode is where both impOSCar2’s oscillators are used to play two notes, each of which can either be assigned the sound from one, or both oscillators, depending on whether one or two notes are depressed.

Poly4: A four-voice polyphonic mode.

Poly8: An eight-voice polyphonic mode.

Poly12: A twelve-voice polyphonic mode.

Poly16: A sixteen-voice polyphonic mode.

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Unison Controls

Glide Spread Selector

As mentioned in the Glide Section, when in Unison mode the Glide Spread Selector adds a lag or spread to each voice so that each voice glides at a different rate. This rate varies from ‘mild’ to ‘wild’ and was one of our favourite features on synths such as the OB8. Try a unison patch with a long portamento time and glide from a low note to a high note to see what we’re talking about.

Unison Mode Knob

This selects from a multitude of Unison modes:

Off: No unison modes are active and normal mono, duo and poly modes as per the envelope triggering section take precedent.

Mono Unison: Use this in conjunction with the Function knob in order to select the amount of Unison voices. NB: In this mode selecting Mono on the function knob will have no effect. You need to use either Duo (for two voice unison) or Poly 4, 8 12 or 16 settings to stack voices accordingly.

Poly 2Vc: A 2-Voice Polyphonic Unison setting and used with the Function knob’s polyphony setting to provide up to 16-Voice polyphony with a 2-voice stack.

Poly 3Vc: A 3-Voice Polyphonic Unison setting and used with the Function knob’s polyphony setting to provide up to 16-Voice polyphony with a 3-voice stack.

Poly 4Vc: A 4-Voice Polyphonic Unison setting and used with the Function knob’s polyphony setting to provide up to 16-Voice polyphony with a 4-voice stack.

Poly 5Vc: A 5-Voice Polyphonic Unison setting and used with the Function knob’s polyphony setting to provide up to 16-Voice polyphony with a 5-voice stack.

Poly 6Vc: A 6-Voice Polyphonic Unison setting and used with the Function knob’s polyphony setting to provide up to 16-Voice polyphony with a 6-voice stack.

Poly 7Vc: A 7-Voice Polyphonic Unison setting and used with the Function knob’s polyphony setting to provide up to 16-Voice polyphony with a 7-voice stack.

Poly 8Vc: An 8-Voice Polyphonic Unison setting and used with the Function knob’s polyphony setting to provide up to 16-Voice polyphony with a 8-voice stack.

Unison Detune Knob

Used to apply a detune between the unison voices.

Unison Spread Knob

Used to apply a stereo spread to the unison voices. Positive values progressively spread each voice across the stereo spectrum. Negative values progressively randomise the position of each voice across the stereo spectrum.

NB: Because of the amount of extra voices Unison introduces, when switching into this mode it’s important that you take into consideration the balance between volume, filter drive and your host application mixer output. If in doubt, turn it down.

Pan and Spread Modes

Pan Mode Knob

This allows you to select from the following pan modes:

Mode 1: notes are panned from left to right with middle C being the centre pan position.

Mode 2: notes are panned in a random manner.

Mode 3: notes alternate left and right (fixed for each voice).

Mode 4: a pseudo-random note allocation to left and right (so each note is always on one side or the other).

Mode 5: notes are dynamically allocated and the side with the fewest notes playing gets the next one.

Pan Spread Knob

Use with the Pan Mode knob to set the ‘spread’ from 0 to 100% for narrow to wide pans respectively.

When playing in Unison mode it’s also possible to set the unison spread so you have each voice and each note being panned for super-spacious results.

Filter Drive and Volume Controls

Filter Drive and Volume Knobs

On the original Oscar there was a single knob to perform both these tasks, with the user firstly controlling volume up to approximately 75% open, and from there introducing an overdrive.

Interestingly, this overdrive function was added because many contemporary keyboard players, such as Jan Hammer and Billy Currie, were routing their instrument audio output through overdrive pedals for a more aggressive sound.

We’ve incorporated this overdrive into impOSCar2 but we’ve split volume and overdrive into two knobs thus allowing a greater range of control between subtle and ‘blitzkrieg’ overdrive.

For ‘blitzkrieg’ overdrive sounds both high filter drive and volume settings are recommended, whereas rolling-off the Filter Drive knob will produce distortion-free tones.

NB: With a combination of the Filter Drive and Volume knobs it’s possible to set a very high audio output level that can overload the output channel of your host application. Therefore it’s important that you take into consideration the balance between volume, filter drive and your host application mixer output when programming sounds.

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Arpeggio and Chord Controls

Arpeggiator Mode Selector

The impOSCar2 arpeggiator contains five modes. Off, Up, Down, Up and Down, and Random.

Arpeggio Octave Shift

Octave shift options have the same Up, Down, Up and Down and Random sequence possibilities as notes. With the Octave Shift function you control the sequence in which the octave shifts occur once all the notes in an octave have been played.

Octave Shift Switchs

There are three octave shift switchs which give the option to add -1 Octave, +1 Octave and +2 Octaves to the notes that form your arpeggiation. You can select any or all of these transpositions.

Pitch/Play Order Mode

Pitch Order Mode determines that notes included are played in pitch order.

Play Order determines that notes are played in the order they were originally played.

NB: In Play Order Mode, if your Octave and Note Order is Random, the Pitch/Play Order Mode switch would normally have no function.

In this case it’s used to decide whether you arpeggiate one octave (play ‘n’ notes randomly, where ‘n’ is the number held down, though you could actually end up repeating some and missing others, because it’s random) and then change octaves, or change octaves randomly after every note.

Tempo/Arpeggio Internal/External Clock Switch

As indicated earlier in the Tempo knob section, arpeggios can be set to Internal or External synchronisation via the Clock switch. If this is set to Internal Source the tempo rate is shown as BPM in the Selected Parameter window. However, if this is set to External Source the tempo rate is shown as Beats Per Bar in the Selected Parameter window.

Chord Hold Switch

A feature borrowed from the OB8.

To use this function, play and hold a chord then press the Chord Hold switch. The chord is automatically stored and can be transposed around the keyboard at will via a single note-on.

Depending on the arpeggio Pitch or Play setting, the ‘root’ note of the chord is either the lowest note or the first note with additional notes played while the chord note is held, adding to the chord.

Additionally, the Chord Hold feature is doubly velocity sensitive, and the velocities for each note within the original chord are subsequently scaled by the velocity with which you retrigger the single note chord.

NB: Any patches saved with the Chord Hold active, when reloaded, will still have the same chord active.

Keyboard Hold Switch

As the name implies, when switched on, this acts as a hold function for both normal chords and arpeggios. Using this, it’s possible to play sustained chords and control arpeggiations in real-time with minimal effort.

Edit Mode Knob

The Edit Mode Knob provides access to additional functions not shown on the main impOSCar2 panel:

N: Is the normal display mode of the impOSCar2 and reveals the pitch-bend and modulation wheels

W1: This reveals the matrix used to create User Wave 1. In addition to a traditional subtractive method, impOSCar2 also allows the user to create and store an assortment of additive waveforms generated by mixing twenty-four harmonics.

There are two User Wave locations that can be assigned to OSC1 and OSC2. These can be saved as part of a patch and as individual User Waves for quick recall via the drop-down User Wave list (See the User Wave Section)

W2: Similar to the W1 mode but used to create the waveform for User Wave 2.

CC: When switched to CC Mode each parameter knob, switch has a pair of small boxes that allow the setting of a MIDI Continuous Controller (CC) number. By assigning each parameter a MIDI CC number you will be able to control that parameter from any MIDI controller transmitting the assigned CC number. impOSCar2 comes with a pre-assigned CC numbers but these can easily be changed to pair a parameter with a knob, slider or switch on your MIDI controller.

If you are unsure of the MIDI CC numbers being transmitted from your controller a MIDI CC ‘learn’ switch is also included. To utilise

this function click the switch on the parameter you wish to control then move your external controller’s knob, slider or switch.

This will then assign the correct MIDI CC to that parameter and this will be shown in the MIDI CC display box impOSCar2 only allows one MIDI CC per parameter.

With CC mode selected it’s also possible to determine the way impOSCar2’s knobs react to mouse control via the Mouse Mode window.

System Default: Simply sets the default control method as determined by your host application.

Circular: Sets the mouse control method to circular movements.

Linear: Sets the mouse control method to horizontal and vertical movements.

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User Interface Size

impOSCar2 allows you to select between three user interface sizes - Small, Regular or Large. To change size choose the desired size from the menu then close and reopen impOSCar2’s interface.

Sizes are:

Small: 840 pixels wide

Regular: 1024 pixels wide

Large: 1600 pixels wide

Small Interface layout

Regular and Large Interface layout

Chorus

Chorus Depth Knob

Sets the depth of the chorus effect.

Chorus Mode

Select one of the four different Chorus Modes by clicking on the LEDs. (The original impOSCar Chorus Mode is selected by clicking the left-most LED).

Chorus Rate Knob

Sets the speed of the chorus effect.

Chorus Level Knob

Controls the amount of chorus applied to your impOSCar2 Patch.

Effects

impOSCar2 features a Chorus and Delay effects section. This is revealed by clicking on the Panel Open/Close green arrow situated to the right of the Chorus Level, Delay Level and Delay Tempo knobs.

To turn the effects On, click on the red Effect switch. Effects are created and stored as part of an impOSCar2 patch.

NB: In the 840 UI size the Effects Panel is below the main parameter section and is visible at all times.

Effects layout on 840 Interface

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Delay

Gate Knob

Using the centre position as a zero value, turning the knob to the right will produce a gating effect, the percentage of which indicates the drop in delay mix when there is no input signal present. This is useful for rhythmic sounds where you want to keep the sound tight.

Turning the knob to the left will produce a ducking function. This will be the percentage by which the delay mix is dropped when there is signal present and is particularly useful for lead sounds where you want clarity when playing fast runs, while still producing a nice echo in the gaps.

Delay Units Knob

Sets the global delay time from between 4 and 32 beats. Use this in conjunction with the Left and Right Delay Length knobs to create interesting delay times for left and right channels respectively

Delay High-pass Filter Knob

Allows you to filter out the low frequencies in the Delay Feedback and let the high frequency feedback pass through.

Delay Low-pass Filter Knob

Allows you to filter out the high frequencies in the Delay Feedback and let the low frequency feedback pass through. Used in conjunction with the Highpass Filter you can fine-tune the delay feedback so that your sound retains its depth without becoming too muddy.

Left and Right Delay Length Knobs

Sets the delay time for the left and right channels from between 1 and 32 units. Use these to create wide stereo delays.

Left and Right Feedback Knobs

Use these to set the feedback level for left and right channels respectively.

Crossed and Uncrossed Switch

Works with the Left and Right Feedback knobs for different delay effects. When uncrossed, the signal from the left output feeds back into the left input and the signal for the right output feeds back into the right input. When crossed the signal from the left output feeds into the right input and the signal from the right output feeds into the left input.

Left and Right Channel Mix Knobs

Sets the levels of the left and right delay channels.

Delay Level Knob

Sets the global level of the delay effect section.

Delay Tempo Knob

Sets the global delay tempo from between 32 and 192 BPM with the option to sync to the host application tempo when switched to MIDI BPM.

Controllers

impOSCar2 offers the user a selection of performance control options.

By clicking on one of the LEDs in this section you select a control source and by turning the Destination knob you can select from a variety of different destinations, these being shown in the Selected Parameter window.

Controller Source LEDs

Mod Wheel: The Mod Wheel controls the selected destination parameter.

Aftertouch: Keyboard Aftertouch controls the selected destination parameter. impOSCar2 responds to both Channel and Polyphonic Aftertouch. NB: See your MIDI controller manual to check Aftertouch type.

Expression: Designed specifically for use with an expression pedal and allows you to control the destination selection via your pedal.

Velocity: impOSCar2 already has a comprehensive set of keyboard velocity controls but, additionally, you can also set up impOSCar2 so that velocity controls the parameter set by the Controller Destination knob.

Controller Amount Knob

This regulates the amount of change in the selected destination

Controller Destination Knob

Drive: When assigned as a destination, the selected source controls the filter drive (See page13).

Filter Frequency: When assigned, the selected source allows control over the filter cut-off frequency.

Filter Separation: When assigned, the selected source allows control over the filter separation.

Filter Q: When assigned, the selected source allows control over the filter Q or resonance.

Pitch Amount: When assigned, the selected source allows control over the pitch amount. This is determined by the settings that correspond to the pitch mod section and the pitch modulation rate is dependent on which LFO the pitch mod is assigned to (see page 9 & 10)

Filter Amount: When assigned, the selected source allows control over the pitch amount. This is determined by the settings which correspond to the pitch mod section and the modulation rate is dependent on which LFO(s) the pitch mod is assigned to (see page 10 & 11).

Aux Mod Amount: When assigned, the selected source allows control over chosen Aux Mod Destination (see page 9). Similarly, the modulation rate is dependent on which LFO(s) the Aux Mod is assigned to via the LEDs.

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Using User Waves

Using User Waves

As explained previously, in addition to a traditional subtractive synthesis sound creation method, the impOSCar2 also allows the creation of waveforms via the addition of twenty-four harmonics. The resultant waveform can then be saved as a User Wave and assigned to OSC1 and/or OSC2 before being processed by the normal subtractive synthesis controls on the front panel.

To create your own User Wave first move the Edit Mode Knob to W1 and make sure that you have User Wave 1 selected in OSC1.

Moving the Edit Mode Knob to W1 reveals the User Wave Matrix and shows the 24 harmonics underneath the grid. To introduce a harmonic simply select the desired harmonic by clicking on the bottom of the grid at the appropriate point and dragging upwards. You’ll see the level of the harmonic indicated by the position of the red line - the taller the line the louder the harmonic.

Using this method of sound creation it’s easy to create your own waveforms which can be named and saved for use within a Patch.

Storing User Waves

To save a User Wave simply click in the box underneath the User Wave Matrix and type in your desired name, then click on the Save switch.

Recalling User Waves

All stored User Waves can be quickly assigned to the appropriate oscillator first by dialing-up User Wave1 or 2 via the OSC Waveform Knob, then by choosing a stored User Wave from either of the User Wave Windows on the main panel. The upper and lower windows are used to assign User Waves to Oscillators 1 and 2 respectively.

NB: When saving a patch containing a User Wave the patch stores the actual wave values, not the wave name. This is so that changing the contents of a named User Wave does not change any other patches using that wave.

For example, let’s say you have several patches which use the same User Wave “Full Odds” but during the course of programming a new sound you change “Full Odds” and store it. The patches which were previously using “Full Odds” do not change - they are now simply listed as “--unnamed--”, but sound the same.

TIP: Clicking and holding down the Alt key allows you to draw your user wave in the user wave matrix and speeds up the process of wave creation. Additionally, holding down the cmd key and clicking on a harmonic will turn that harmonic down to zero immediately

Using The Arpeggiator

The impOSCar2 arpeggiator can be used in either Monophonic, Duophonic, Polyphonic or Unison modes and has been drastically enhanced in terms of features since the original impOSCar.

The first thing to do is decide whether you want to synchronise your arpeggio to the host sequencer or set the BPM with the Tempo Knob in the triggering s ection. If you choose the sync option, click the Ext Clock switch.

Now choose a beats per bar value from the aforementioned Tempo Knob.

Return to the arpeggio Knob and select any of the Up, Down, Up and Down and Random note modes using the corresponding LEDs.

Next, play a chord - activating the KBD HOLD switch will hold that arpeggio indefinitely and free up your hands for more creative pursuits.

Octave Shift Switches

There are three octave shift switchs which give the option to add -1 Octave, +1 Octave and +2 Octaves to the chord that forms your arpeggio. You can select any or all of these transpositions.

Arpeggio Octave Shift

When using the Octave Shift function you can also control the sequence in which the octave shifts occur. The Octave Shift options have the same Up, Down, Up and Down and Random sequence possibilities as notes within an octave.

Pitch/Play Mode

With Pitch Mode selected the number of notes held down will play before any selected octave changes take place. With Play Mode selected any selected octave changes occur with each note.

Several more options are now available to you, including the ability to repeat either or both of the envelope generators in accordance with the synchronised tempo value. This is achieved by selecting RPT1, RPT2 or RPT1+2 from the Triggering Knob. Select RPT1+2 to retrigger both envelopes and you should immediately notice a difference in the sound of your arpeggiation. From here try changing the values of certain filter envelope generator controls (such as decay) and listen to the changes.

You can also alter the gate time of the envelopes via the Gate Time Knob but first, make sure that the release times of both envelope generators are set to approximately half-way. Now turn the Gate Time Knob from right to left and you’ll hear the results.

It’s also possible to create patterns synchronizing the LFO to the Arpeggio tempo by selecting either Clock or MIDI via the LFO Sync Knob. For a more detailed explanation of the sync options check the LFO section of the manual (page 10) but once you’ve chosen the most appropriate one try setting the LFO Waveform to Random before applying it via the LFO Amount Knob.

Finally, play around with the various Mono/Duo, Poly and even Unison modes - with the right sounds assigned, duophonic and polyphonic arpeggio patterns can sound amazing.

Here are some guides to using sections of impOSCar2

HOW TO’S

Select User Wave Knob position: W1

Draw your own User Wave

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Editing the .sup fileThere are a raft of other things you can do via the .sup file which tailors the instrument more towards your own way of working.

The location of the .sup file is as follows and is opened with any Text Editor:

Mac: User/Library/Preferences/com.gforcesoftware.impOSCar2VST.sup

PC: C://Program Files/GForce/impOSCar2

After you’ve made your changes to the .sup file simply save it to the same location and your changes will take effect the next time you open the impOSCar2.

NB: Irrespective of which version of impOSCar2 you’re using (AU, VST, RTAS or Standalone) the impOSCar2VST.sup file name remains consistent.

Layout

This affects the default setting for the impOSCar2 GUI Size with choices as follows:

{Layout}{Large} - 1600 Pixels

{Layout}{Regular} - 1024 Pixels

{Layout}{Small} - 840 Pixels

Knob Mode

Determines the default setting of the Knob movement via the mouse with choices as follows:

{Knob Mode}{System Default} - Where the host determines the control movement

{Knob Mode}{Linear} - Vertical or horizontal movements control Knobs

{Knob Mode}{Circular} - Circular movements control Knobs

{Knob Mode}{Relative Circular} - Circular movements control amount rather than an absolute position. Clicking on Shift at the same time gives you finer adjustments (as per Linear Mode)

Edit Mode

Determines the default setting when initially opening the impOSCar2 with choices as follows:

{Edit Mode}{N} - GUI Opens with Edit Mode Knob in N Position

{Edit Mode}{Wave 1} - GUI Opens with Edit Mode Knob in W1 Position

{Edit Mode}{Wave 2} - GUI Opens with Edit Mode Knob in W2 Position

{Edit Mode}{CC} - GUI Opens with Edit Mode Knob in CC Position

Effects Panel

Affects whether the Effects panel is open or closed when first launching impOSCar2

{Effects Panel}{closed} - GUI Opens with Effects Window closed

{Effects Panel}{open} - GUI Opens with Effects Window open

Patch Format

Determines the destination format of your converted patches with choices of the following:

{Patch Format}{VST} - Converted patches are saved as FXPs

{Patch Format}{AU} - Converted patches are saved as AUPRESETS

{Patch Format}{VST+AU} - Converted patches are saved as FXPs and AUPRESETS

Delete Original Patch

Determines whether an original impOSCar Patch is deleted or renamed after the conversion to an impOSCar2 Patch is done. Options are as follows:

{Delete Original Patch On Convert}{off} - The original patches are given the _bk suffix

{Delete Original Patch On Convert}{on} - The original patches are deleted

Using Duo Mode

To get an idea of how Duo Mode works set OSC1 to a PWM waveform and set OSC2 to a Square wave and transpose it two octaves higher than OSC1. Play and hold a single note (middle C) - you will hear that this triggers both oscillators. Now with the original middle C held down, play additional notes below and above - you’ll hear that these additional notes are only triggering OSC2 while the original sustained middle C plays the OSC1 sound.

Keeping the middle C held, add the G below. Having done this, stop playing the original middle C but continue to hold the G. Any additional notes played will now trigger the OSC1 sound while the original G will play the sound associated with OSC2.

Using External Audio

Using the Effects version of the impOSCar2 it’s now possible to route external audio into the impOSCar2 and process it via the impOSCar2’s filters, Ring Modulator, Envelopes and Effects.

In Abelton Live 7x this is as easy as instantiating it as an effect on an existing Audio Track. However you do need to be mindful of a couple of things once you’ve included it in the audio path. Firstly, make sure you have an audio track playing and have placed the impOSCar2FX version in the signal path and follow these instructions

1. Turn both OSC 1 and 2 Knobs until they read ‘Audio Input’

2. Activate the Keyboard Hold Switch

3. Play a note on the impOSCar2 FX GUI Keyboard.

This will now open the audio path and you will hear your original audio track played through the impOSCar2. You are now free to process it with the impOSCar2’s Filter Modes, Filter Cutoff and Resonance (Q), the LFOs, Envelopes and even the Chorus and Delay Effects. You can also process the audio via the Ring Modulator although to do this you will need to make a few changes to the OSC settings.

1. In the ‘Mix’ section, move the OSC Balance Knob so that only OSC1 can be heard.

2. Activate ‘Full Ring Mod’ via the LEDs above the OSC Balance Knob.

3. Change the Setting of OSC2 to another waveform such as PWM or Sawtooth.

4. Move the OSC Balance Knob so that both OSC 1 and 2 can now be heard.

5. Alter the Octave Shift, Pitch Transpose and Fine Tune of OSC2 and listen to the results.

6. Experiment by using the Aux Mod Routing to OSC2 Pitch and assigning this to an LFO waveform and modulating it as you see fit.

7. Use the Delay Effect to create stereo imagery for the effected part.

8. Experiment with External Sync and the Envelope Repeat Knob settings. Also use the gate time Knob to gate the entire audio part.

Within Apple’s Logic, it’s also possible to load the effect version into an Instrument Channel as a MIDI controlled effect and side-chain audio into the impOSCar2FX.

The advantage of using this method over a normal insert effect is that you can record the notes necessary to open the audio path and allow audio to pass through the impOSCar2 Effect, as MIDI data. Accordingly, you can also process audio via the arpeggiator which can create some wonderful rhythmic patterns when using patches that have filter tracking applied.

For full details of side-chaining audio in Logic please refer to the Logic manual but once you’re familiar with this simply add the impOSCar2FX as a MIDI Controlled Effect and do the following:

1. Set the impOSCar2FX oscillators to Audio Input.

2. Either activate the keyboard Hold Switch and play a note or record notes as MIDI in the track.

3. Side-chain the audio from your desired track into the impOSCar2FX.

4. Hit play and tweak.

There are many things you can do with your external audio once it’s running through the impOSCar2FX such as apply Filter Cutoff and Resonance (Q), LFOs, Ring Modulation (try setting Osc2 to a synth waveform when using this), Envelope Repeats, Arpeggiator and the Chorus and Delay. Experimenting is the key here - don’t be afraid but be mindful of damaging your speakers when using extreme filter settings.

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Exchanging Patches in the Program Change window:

To exchange Patches in the Program Change List, do the following:

1. Select the Patch in the Program Change Window that you want to move. (Fig 13a)

2. Alt + Left Click the Patch with which you wish to make the exchange. (Fig 13b)

3. The Patch will exchange and no other Patches will be affected. (Fig 13c)

Ctrl + Left Click -> rotate programs between currently highlighted and the one under the cursor.

In the central Patch Window, selecting a Patch via Shift + Left Click will assign each selected Patch incrementally to the Program Change Window. This makes it easy to to assign of a series of Patches to consecutive Program Change allocations.

Assigning Banks to Program Change numbers:

In the left-hand Bank Window, it’s possible to assign the first 128 Patches within that Bank to the Program Change window as follows:

1. Highlight the Program Change Number at which you want the Patches to be assigned to.

2. In the Bank Window, Shift + Click the desired Bank. (Fig 14a)

3. Each Patch within that Bank will be allocated a Program Change number, starting at the currently highlighted Program Number and continuing to end of the Program Change Bank or Patch Bank, whichever comes first. (Fig 14b)

Program Change Window

The Program Change window shows a list of numbers each representing a unique MIDI Program Change number from 0 to 127.

Assigning Patches to Program Change numbers:

You will see that Program Change number ‘000’ is highlighted in white. To assign a Patch to this Program Change number shift-click on any Patch shown within the Patch window.

Assigning Patches sequentially:

To assign Patches sequentially to Program Change numbers, shift-click on Patches shown within the Patch window. (Figs 11a, 11b)

Assigning Patches non-sequentially:

Should you wish to assign Patches in a non-sequential manner, click on the Program Change number within the Program Change window you wish to use (it will turn white) and shift-click on the Patch you want to assign to that Program Change number. (Figs 12a, 12b)

Program Change windowIf you are using MIDI, understanding the Program Change window is essential to get the best from impOSCar2

+ SHIFT

Fig 11a. Default ‘000’ in Program Change window

Fig 11b. Shift-Click locates Patch to ‘000’.

+ SHIFT

Fig 12a. Default ‘000’ in Program Change window

Fig 12b. Shift-Click locates Patch to ‘000’.

Fig 13a. Select Patch you want to move Fig 13b. Select Patch you want to it to Fig 13c. Alt+Click to assign Patch

+ ALT

+ SHIFT

Fig 14a. Shift-Click Bank name Fig 14b. All Patches within the Bank are assigned Program Change numbers

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Clear List Switch

Removes every Patch from the Program window.

Clear Prog Switch

Removes the currently selected Patch in the Program Change Window.

Program Change Bank Selector

Using the drop down menu you can select from up to 16 Program Change Banks. (Fig 15b)

Patch File Path Display

This display shows the location of any Patches you mouse-over in the Extended Patch Browser. This is especially useful in locating the disc location of Patches allocated to the M1, M2, M3 and M4 switches.

Additionally, if you mouse-over an unconverted impOSCar2 Patch or Bank it will display the path followed by a ‘V1’ tag.

Patch Conversion from impOSCar to impOSCar2

Using the Extended Patch Browser, it’s possible to convert an original impOSCar FXB (Bank), FXP (Patch) or Logic AUPPRESET into the newer impOSCar2 patch format.

To perform the conversion we recommend placing any of the aforementioned (FXB, FXP and AUPRESET) files into the following locations:

Mac

HD/Library/Audio/Presets/GForce/impOSCar2

PC

C://Program Files/VSTPlug-Ins/impOSCar2 Patches

These files will be read by the impOSCar2 Extended Patch Browser and when you next open it, you will see that, on the right of these files, is an icon. This icon indicates that the file has not been converted. Nonetheless, you can still hear the Patch by clicking on it.

To perform the conversion process, simply click on the next to either the Bank or the Patch. ImpOSCar2 will then convert the file(s) and write to disk. The Bank or Patch will the display a new icon -

AUPRESETS will appear in the Browser as folders containing Patches. Once converted an actual folder with the same name will be created on disc and the Patches within the AUPRESET will be written within this folder. The original AUPRESET will now have a ‘._bk’ added to show that the conversion process has taken place and this can now be discarded.

FXBs will appear in the Browser as Folders with Patches contained within. Once converted an actual folder will be created and the Patches within the FXB stored within. The original FXB will now have a ‘._bk’ added to show that the conversion process has taken place and this can now be discarded.

FXPs will appear in the Browser as individual Patches. Once converted it will appear as an FXP and the original FXB will now have a ‘._bk’ added to show that the conversion process has taken place and that this can now be discarded.

Fig 16. Patch File Path Display

While the impOSCar2’s default settings for file conversions are as described above, there are several other options that are available to the user via settings in the impOSCar2.sup file. For example, it’s possible to save out any FXB or FXP as an AUPRESET for use within Logic. It’s also possible to have the original file automatically delete itself after the conversion process has been completed.

M1, M2, M3, M4 Switches.

These switches allow the assignment of up to eight of your favourite Patches and quickly select between them.

To assign a Patch to an M Switch, simply have that Patch active and then use the keystrokes below while clicking on the M Switch where you wish to store that Patch. The Patch will then be assigned to that M Switch and whenever you click on it again, this Patch will be recalled.

Mac: Command + click on M Switch (to assign Patches 1-4) Shift + Command + click on M Switch (to assign Patches 5-8)

PC: Ctrl+ click on M Switch (to assign Patches 1-4) Shift + Ctrl+ click on M Switch (to assign Patches 5-8)

NB: Any Patches allocated to an M Switch in one instance of impOSCar2, will also be allocated to other instances of impOSCar2.

To access Patches 1-4, simply click on the M Switches.

To access the Patches 5-8, hold down the Shift key and click on an M Switches

Fig 15a. Clear List, Clear Prog and Program Change Bank Selector (MIDI Bank) switches

Fig 15b. Click the MIDI Bank selector to reveal a drop-down list

A Note About Patches.

When developing impOSCar2, special care has been taken to make Patches from the original impOSCar compatible with impOSCar2. This is done via the Extended Patch Browser. Converting Patches is explained on page XX of the manual and this is essential reading for those of you who wish to take your previously programmed Patches and Banks from impOSCar and convert them to impOSCar2 format. However, we’ve also included the original impOSCar Patches as standard in impOSCar2.

The rule of thumb here is that the Patches will be the same except that routings to the additional LFO and the Controller Destinations have also been set up to save you time doing this yourself.

Additionally, some of these original sounds have also been used when creating Unison Patches and in this case, the names of the duplicate Patches will include the word ‘Unison’ in them or simply have a ‘2’ added at the end.

We’ve also included the original OSCar Patches as well as ‘Redux’ versions of these. The latter are essentially the same Patches but with the additional LFO routing or Controller destinations added.

Finally, we were fortunate enough to be provided with some original impOSCar Patches from Paul Hartnoll and while these have been kept as original, we’ve also done ‘Redux’ versions of these too. For example, the Patch ‘AcidWipes’ is original and the Patch named ‘AcidWipesRedux’ will be the ‘enhanced’ version.

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Snapshot

The Snapshot function allows you to quickly save the Patch you’re working on. This is handy when you’re on a creative roll and want to save a sound without interrupting the flow.

For example, you have programmed a sound to your liking, so you take a Snapshot. You then continue to develop the sound and take multiple Snapshots as the sound evolves. Each Snapshot is automatically saved for recall later.

Storing a Snapshot

To store a Snapshot on a Mac: hold down the Command key and click on the Patch Save Switch.

To store a Snapshot on a PC: hold down the Ctrl key and click on the Patch Save Switch.

Nothing will appear to have changed, but when you open the Patch Browser you’ll see a Snapshot folder in the Banks window and, contained within, are your Snapshots listed according to the date and time the snapshot was taken.

You can click and audition them in the same way as normal Patches and if you find you want to save one to another folder, highlight it, then hold down the Alt key and click on the Patch Save Switch.

You’ll now have the option to rename that patch and MOVE it to another folder, deleting the original snapshot in the process. The Snapshot folder location is set in the ‘.sup’ file. There are different Snapshot folder locations for instrument and fx versions.

Fig 17. The Snapshot folder as seen in the Banks Window - the contents can be seen in the Patch Window

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Touch Digital impOSCar2 Controller

The impOSCar2 controller is designed to control nearly every main parameter of the impOSCar2 software to the point where it’s easy to forget you’re controlling a software instrument, such is the sonic quality of impOSCar2 and the intuitive and creative nature of the impOSCar2 Controller. Furthermore, the default CC mapping of impOSCar2 enables you to be working in this blissful way within a few minutes of both the software installation and unboxing the controller.

Once each item is installed and connected, using the default CC assignments when you click on a button or turn a knob on the controller the corresponding button or knob on the impOSCar2 software will react accordingly. One of the beautiful elements of the controller is that you quickly learn to stop staring at your computer screen and instead become immersed in the true joy and creativity that tactile control allows. Because of the one-to-one nature of the controller, any mental, translational processes that would occur with a generic controller vanish and give way to a unhindered creative process whereby you are in control.

You move a knob - the impOSCar2 parameter responds accordingly. Simple eh?

However, there are times when you may want the controller to respond to changes that you make to the software. For example, when changing a patch on the software you may want the lights of the controller to echo the state of this patch. This is known as Bi-Directional Control and due to the complexities and limitations of various plug-in formats, when using the Touch Digital Controller for impOSCar2 it’s currently possible to set up bi-directional control with the VST versions of impOSCar2 only.

The following procedure shows how to set this up for Cubase 5 but the principle is similar in other hosts such as Ableton’s Live.

If you need specific instructions for setting up other VST host applications you’ll need to contact their support department or talk to Touch Digital Controllers directly - www.touchdigitalcontrollers.co.uk

1. Make sure you have the impOSCar2 Controller plugged in via the USB port and turned on.

2. Launch Cubase

(Follow workflow ➡)3. Within Cubase create an Instrument Track for the impOSCar2

4. In the Output Routing section of this Instrument Track, select ‘impOSCar2 - Midi In’

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5. Just below the Output Routing section, select MIDI Channel 1 7. In this MIDI Track select the MIDI Inputs to ‘impOSCar2 - MidiOut’

6. Create a MIDI Track 8. In this same MIDI Track select ‘Touch Digital Controller’ in the Output Routing section

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9. In this same MIDI Track, just below the Output Routing section, select MIDI Channel 1

10. Finally, make sure both the Instrument Track and the MIDI Track are Highlighted

Now, when you click on a light on the impOSCar2 interface, the lights on the controller will light up accordingly. Similarly, when you change a patch on the impOSCar2, the active status of any lights within that patch will be shown on the impOSCar2 Controller.