Image Organization, Metadata, and Digital Workflow Arthur P. Miceli May 8st, 2010 Miceli Photography...

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  • Slide 1
  • Image Organization, Metadata, and Digital Workflow Arthur P. Miceli May 8st, 2010 Miceli Photography Mentoring Series
  • Slide 2
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Agenda Introduction 5 minutes Part 1 - Image Organization 25 minutes Part 2 - Metadata 30 minutes Part 3 - Digital Workflow 30 minutes Q&A ~ minutes
  • Slide 3
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Part 1 Image Organization
  • Slide 4
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Image Organization No single right approach; but do have an approach and process you follow. Avoid the shoebox syndrome (whether film or digital). Your specific approach will depend on a number of factors: Personal: e.g. to preserve as a family legacy Professional: e.g. stock or wedding photography The constraint is time available and your degree of commitment relative to lifes other demands.
  • Slide 5
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Image Organization My personal photography collection is comprised of: Digital images (from digital camera). (60,000 image files, 256GB) Scans of old family photographs (3100 images, 14GB) 35mm prints and associated negatives (20,000 pictures, 600+ rolls) 35mm slides (7000 slides, 200+ rolls) Home videos: VHS-C (160 tapes, 80+ hours) Home movies: Super 8mm silent and sound movie film (4000 feet)
  • Slide 6
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Image Organization Three main components to the organization and storage of my photography collection. 1.All the media themselves(the film, slides, videos, digital files, etc.) 2.Photo reference logs (i.e. diary of all of the above, taken to date). All contained in a single PC folder. 3.Future - Guidebook to the Miceli Photography Collection (i.e. a brain dump of all of this; a work in progress)
  • Slide 7
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Physical Media Storage Prints stored in their original film wallets in archival cartons from University Archival Products. Prints and their negatives are separated as are odd from even roll numbers. Slides: some are in Kodak trays, with most being in their original small boxes. Noteworthy/competition quality slides are stored in archival slide pages. Long term goal of digitizing entire collection. Would enable easy replication of the entire collection and mitigate risk of total loss. Progress to date includes: 100% of my parents photo collection has been scanned. My Uncle Arthurs war letters have been camera scanned. All 160 VHS-C tapes have been converted to DVD. (Are also Live and Local on my hard drive) All Super 8mm sound movies have been converted to DVD. (Are also Live and Local on my hardrive.)
  • Slide 8
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli High Level Conceptual View Personal computer with its Live and Local disk storage. OS image backup #2 (i.e. a disaster recovery backup image) Viewing and Output Options Browse and view on your desktop PC or laptop Make prints and enlargements Share via email Social networking sites Online photo galleries Google Earth/GPS Personal media players Smartphones (iPhone, Droid, etc.) View on your television Digital photo frames Create elaborate slideshows. Future, yet to be imagined uses. OS image backup #1 (i.e. a disaster recovery backup image) Media and file backup(s) Set #1 Media and file backup(s) Set #2 Miscellaneous backups Facilitates easy replication and safeguarding of your entire collection.
  • Slide 9
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Digital Image Organization
  • Slide 10
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Digital Image Organization
  • Slide 11
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Digital Image Organization
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  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Digital Image Organization
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  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Digital Image Organization
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  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli File Naming
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  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli File Naming
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  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli RAW Capture Key consideration: The cost of flash memory cards and more importantly hard drive storage is not a significant concern due to cost per GB dropping faster than my storage growth. (eg. As low as $99 for an external 1TB multi-interface drive.) With RAW, you can have your cake and eat it. I.e. you can shoot RAW only and still easily obtain JPG, TIF, and/or PSD files if you so choose. RAW contains all of the image data captured by the cameras sensor. Enables you greater flexibility in post-processing. Enables the color balance(daylight, tungsten, custom, etc.), colorspace(sRGB, Adobe RGB, etc), file format, and bit depth to be selected after the time of capture. RAW provides several stops greater exposure latitude potential. As a practical matter, I shoot JPG for action and casual photography; RAW for serious and professional photography. I rarely shoot RAW+JPG in camera. It is an unnecessary waste of memory card capacity, lengthens camera burst processing times, and image transfer time to your PC. In my workflow, I convert all my RAW files to the standard Adobe DNG file format. Helps protect against raw file format obsolecsense. DNG eliminates need for XMP files. For precise color balance, I recommend use of a white balance reference card such as the WhiBal card (www.rawworkflow.com), Photovision Digital Reference Card, and/or Gretag MacBeth ColorChecker.(or Passport). www.rawworkflow.com
  • Slide 17
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Part 2 MetaData
  • Slide 18
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Image MetaData What is Metadata? Metadata refers to information about the image. I.e. the data is the image itself and the metadata is information regarding that image. Types of Metadata? Embedded (resides within the image file itself) EXIF: Image parameters automatically populated by your camera at the time of capture. Includes things like date/time taken, shutter speed, f-stop, lens used, focal length, etc. May also include camera make, serial number, and your name. IPTC: variety of fields available for your use. Includes such things as your identify and contact information, copyright and usage rights, description, keywords, etc. External: Image information such as ratings, keywords, virtual collections, etc typically stored by a cataloging application in its own database.
  • Slide 19
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli
  • Slide 20
  • Metadata Search
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  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Review So Far The challenges associated with organizing your photographic collection. Approach to numbering and storage of my legacy collection. The end result (folder heirarchy and filenaming) of my ingestion and organize workflow. Role and value of Metadata. Concepts and rationale related to RAW, GPS, etc.
  • Slide 22
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Part 3 Digital Workflow
  • Slide 23
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Digital Workflow Phases Digital workflow: the series of steps you employ to ingest, organize, modify, and/or output your images. This presentation focuses on the ingest and organize phases. Recommend you document your workflow and update it as it evolves over time. Ingest: the movement of the image files from your cameras memory card to your computers hard drive. Remove your memory card from the camera and plug into a card reader. Use in conjunction with the image ingestion features of software such as Canons ZoomBrowser, ACDSEE, or Photoshop Bridge. Organize: the phase which deals with reviewing and deleting images, applying ratings and keywording, metadata, and file renaming, etc. Modify: the phase which represents all the modifications you may choose to make with programs such as Photoshop or ACDSEE. Examples include adjusting levels, curves, masking, layers, color correction, sharpening, etc. Output: the steps you would utilize to prepare your modified images for output; which can include a variety of uses including print, Internet image galleries and websites, and/or professional photo labs. Examples include cropping, resizing, converting colorspace, etc.
  • Slide 24
  • Copyright 2010 Arthur P. Miceli Ingest and Organize Workflow Steps 1.Ingest images from the memory card into a folder named yyyyymmdd. 2.If the image folder contains any RAW files: a)Use the DNG converter to convert them to DNG. b)Delete the original RAW files and any XMP files that might exist. 3.Determine the next roll sequence number to be used. 4.(Optional) Assign ratings here. 5.Do deletions here. 6.Apply my standard metadata template to all the selected files. 7.Then enter into the Description field the Roll number and descriptive information pertaining to all the images. 8.(Optional) Then iteratively select images as appropriate and add additional description data. 9.Batch Rename: a)Set sort order of images to date/time captured. b)Select all image files. (CTRL-A) I.e. Select all files, then deselect files that are not image files. (For example: Thumbs, ZbThumbnail, Bridge cache files, etc.). (Renaming them would have broken their respective programs ability to read them.) c)Perform Batch Rename using a predefined template. 10.(Optional) Do keywording here. 11.(Optional) Open all the DNG files in ACR and adjust to suit. Exit(Done) from ACR. 12.From Adobe Bridge, use the Photoshop Image Processor tool to convert any DNG files to JPG. All metadata and filenames are inherited from their DNG parent. 13.Rename t