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  • ICON Ceramics and Glass Group Conference 7th - 8th September 2017

    Ashmolean Museum

    & Magdalen College

    Oxford

  • Foreword from the Committee

    We are delighted to be able to welcome you to Oxford this weekend, The CGG has organised a vibrant programme of speakers and visits in Oxford this September. Presentations from an international pool of speakers will be held at Magdalen College; one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford founded in 1458. Speakers and posters will cover a range of conservation topics concerning ceramics, glass and enamels including 3D printing in clay. The conference will be drawn to a close with an outdoor drinks reception in the exquisite college Cloisters.

    The CGG conference has been planned to coincide with Oxford Open Doors held on the weekend of September 9th and 10th. Delegates are encouraged to visit some of these historic venues across the university and city, many of which only open to the public once a year. University college chapels are particularly strong in stained glass and highly recommended.

    We do hope that you enjoy the weekend, learn something new and take the opportunity to enjoy Oxford's rich cultural heritage.

    ICON Ceramics and Glass Group Committee

  • ICON Ceramics and Glass Group Conference Thursday 7th September 2017 Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

    13:30 Arrival – Ashmolean Museum

    14:00

    The Conservation Labs and galleries both opened in 2009 as a part of the museum redevelopment. The galleries are devoted to the history of conservation and contemporary conservation practice. The gallery tour will be led by Mark Norman, former UKIC chair and recently retired Head of Conservation at the Ashmolean. Group 1 - Visit to the Galleries Group 2 – Visit to the Conservation Studios

    15:00

    The Conservation Labs and galleries both opened in 2009 as a part of the museum redevelopment. The galleries are devoted to the history of conservation and contemporary conservation practice. The gallery tour will be led by Mark Norman, former UKIC chair and recently retired Head of Conservation at the Ashmolean. Group 3 - Visit to the Galleries Group 4 – Visit to the Conservation Studios

    19:00 – 22:00 Conference Dinner Pizza Express at Golden Cross Walk, 8 Cornmarket St, Oxford OX1 3EX

  • Friday 8th September 2017 Magdalen College, Oxford

    08:45 – 09:15 Arrival & Registration 09:15 – 09:30 Welcome & Opening Remarks Session 1 09:30 – 10:00 Wendy Walker, Metropolitan

    Museum Two Della Robbia Reliefs at The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Conservation Treatment and Insights into Workshop Practices

    10:00 – 10:30 Ariel O'Connor, Smithsonian Museum

    Preserving Fragility: Conservation of Kristen Morgin’s Unfired Clay

    10:30 – 11:00 Tiago Oliveira, TO Conservation

    De Rijp whaling scene – Conservation and Restoration of a Delft tile picture

    11:00 – 11:20 Morning Break & Student Poster Session Session 2 11:20 – 11:50 Nick Teed & Laura Tempest, York

    Glaziers Trust Protective Glazing Stained Glass

    11:50 – 12:20 George Bailey & Andrew Schroeder, Australian War Memorial

    Radioactive Glass and Enamels

    12:20 – 12:50 David Huson, University of the West of England

    3D Printing technologies for Ceramics Conservation

    12:50 – 14:10 Lunch Session 3 14:10 – 14:40 Ceramics and Glass Group AGM 14:40 – 15:10 Sabrina Schaffarczyk, Uni. of

    Applied Sciences Berlin Graduate

    18th c. Figure of Zeus

    15:10 – 15:40 Rebecca Gridley, Metropolitan Museum

    Decision Making in the Restoration of a 16th Century Glass Vessel

    15:40 – 16:00 Afternoon Tea Session 4 16:00 – 16:30 Dr Tatiana Shlykova, The

    Hermitage Recent Projects Ancient Ceramics vs Fritwares

    16:30 – 17:00 Dana Norris, Watt and Norris Conservation

    13th c. Fritware Bowl from Kashan

    17:00 – 17:15 Questions 17:15 – 17:30 Closing Remarks 17:30 Drinks in the Cloisters

  • SESSION 1

    Two Della Robbia Reliefs at The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Conservation Treatment and Insights into Workshop Practices Wendy Walker, Carolyn Riccardelli

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art has in its collection two masterpieces by Andrea della Robbia (1435-1523) that have recently undergone major conservation treatment. The lunette of Saint Michael the Archangel, which sustained extensive damage after a tragic fall in 2008, returned to The Met’s galleries in 2015 after years of meticulous reconstruction. While daunting, the treatment of the lunette was relatively straightforward including cleaning, dismantling, bonding, filling, inpainting, and dealing with the problems of metamerism. The project culminated in the creation of an elegant mounting system designed to secure each of the sculpture’s original 12 interlocking sections independently. More recently, a massive tondo with a central representation of the virtue Prudence was treated in preparation for a loan. The tondo was found to be structurally unstable in its 150- year-old mount, as well as having many aesthetic issues due to previous restoration campaigns. Conservators disassembled the sections with the goal of remounting this large work in preparation for travel. Following disassembly, a previously unknown numbering system was revealed that led to a dramatically different arrangement of the tondo’s garland. These and other findings, such as glaze repairs, led to insights into workshop practices and the traditions of della Robbia manufacture in 15th century Florence. Biography Wendy Walker specializes in the conservation of ceramics and has a particular interest in the technology of pottery. After attending West Dean College to train in the Conservation of Ceramics, Glass and Related Materials, she worked at the British Museum and Victoria & Albert Museum before coming to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1999. During her career she has worked as site conservator at excavations in the Mediterranean and the Middle East and in her present position at the Met she conserves a range of ceramics including Greek and Roman terracottas, Italian Renaissance maiolica, European porcelain and early American Art pottery. Recent conservation treatment of several della Robbia works at the Met, study days, and research trips to Italy have resulted in an enduring interest in the technology of these pieces and workshop practices.

  • Preserving Fragility: Conservation of Kristen Morgin’s Unfired Clay Ariel O'Connor

    The Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum invited artist Kristen Morgin to present work in an exhibition titled “Visions and Revisions: Renwick Invitational 2016.” This invitational showcased four artists who take innovative approaches to their mediums with themes of transformation, ruin, and rebirth. Kristin Morgin’s work ranges in size from full-size cars and cellos to nostalgic assemblages of toys and games. They appear to be discarded and found objects, but are made from unfired clay painted with a variety of media including house paint, acrylic, tempera, ballpoint pen, white-out, and graphite. The fragile nature of unfired clay, and the wonder with which people approach a work made from this material, is inherent to the work itself. One particularly fragile piece titled “Snow White and Woodland Creatures” is made from 1mm-thin unfired clay painted to look like playing cards and torn paper nailed to the gallery wall, and sustained cracking and damage during transit to the museum. In the past, many of Morgin’s other works have sustained similar shipping damages due to their extreme fragility. The artist typically repairs them with wood glue, then paints the cracks with new elements, thus changing the work. For this Smithsonian exhibition, we wanted to attempt a repair with conservation materials in the two weeks before the exhibition opened. This paper will outline the research and testing into the most appropriate method to repair the works without staining the clay or solubilizing the varied commercial paints on the surface. The selected materials and final treatment will be discussed. The nature of fragility and inherent vice will be a theme throughout. Biography Ariel O’Connor is an Objects Conservator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) Lunder Conservation Center in Washington, DC, USA. Prior to joining SAAM in 2016, Ariel worked at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, Walters Art Museum, Harvard Art Museums, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She graduated with an M.A. and C.A.S. in Art Conservation from SUNY Buffalo State in 2009 and a B.F.A. in Dance and Spanish Language and Literature from Tulane University. In addition to museum conservation, she has exercised her childhood love of archaeology as a conservator for the Aphrodisias Excavations and Gordion Excavations Project in Turkey, and the Mugello Valley Archaeological Project (Poggio Colla) in Italy.

  • De Rijp Whaling Scene: Conservation and Restoration of a Delft tile picture Tiago Oliveira, Liesa Brierly, Birthe Christensen, Sue Prichard This tile panel was conserved in preparation for the re-opening of the Queen’s House (Greenwich) in 2016. It had been waiting for attention in a