How to Avoid Informationآ  Plagiarism (same words, no quotation marks): In research writing,...

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Transcript of How to Avoid Informationآ  Plagiarism (same words, no quotation marks): In research writing,...

  • 1/21/2011 1

    How to Avoid Plagiarism

  • 1/21/2011 2

    Introduction

     What is PLAGIARISM?

     My job is to make sure you know

    what it is, and how to avoid it…

  • 1/21/2011 3

    Topics of Discussion

     So, what is this thing called

    plagiarism?

     How can I avoid plagiarism within

    my research paper and other

    work?

     Why is academic integrity so

    important if I‟m only looking to get

    out of school?

  • 1/21/2011 4

    How do we define “PLAGIARISM”?

     Tough one… It ranges from failure

    to properly cite your sources all the

    way through “wholesale cheating”.

     American Heritage Dictionary: the

    theft and use of another‟s ideas or

    writings as one‟s own.”

     Plagiarism can be unintentional or

    deliberate, but it can be avoided!

  • 1/21/2011 5

    Examples of Plagiarism

     Buying a paper from a research

    services or term paper mill…$$$$

     Turning in another student‟s work

    without that student‟s knowledge

     Turning in a paper that someone

    else wrote for you

     Copying from a source without

    proper acknowledgement

  • 1/21/2011 6

    Examples of Plagiarism, continued  Copying materials from a source using

    proper documentation but leaving out

    quotation marks

     Paraphrasing from a source without

    appropriate documentation

    AND….thanks to the Internet,

     Turning in a paper from a “free term

    paper” website…

    PUT THE BRAKES ON PLAGIARISM! (http://alexia.lis.uiuc.edu/~janicke/plagiary.htm)

  • 1/21/2011 7

    What are “Paper Mills”? Paper mills are businesses

    (usually on-line) that provide

    you with a pre-written research

    paper.

     Does the disclaimer matter?

     Cost: $1-10 per page, with

    delivery being up to $15

     Some require a submitted paper

    in order for a “freebie”

  • 1/21/2011 8

    Examples of Paper Mills

    Yep, I know „em, as do MANY others!

    There are at least 250 sites that

    promote these “specials”…

    FREE PAPERS

     School Sucks.com

     Other People‟s Papers

     Absolutely Free On-Line Essays

    PURCHASED PAPERS  Evil House of Cheat

     A1 Term Paper

     Genius Papers

  • 1/21/2011 9

    What does the purchaser get?

    Other than getting in academic

    trouble, you would get…

     No guarantee of quality or

    accuracy

     Papers that are dated and not

    reflective of current events and

    trends

     Substandard writing and research (www.coastal.edu/library/papermil.htm)

    CAVEAT EMPTOR!

  • 1/21/2011 10

    How to Avoid Plagiarism

     Why should I be concerned?

     How can I prevent plagiarism in my

    work?

     What are the guidelines I should

    follow to avoid plagiarizing

    someone else‟s work?

  • 1/21/2011 11

    Why should I be concerned about plagiarism?

     If you do it, you‟re cheating

    yourself- what are YOU learning

    from this?

     It‟s dishonest because it

    misrepresents you and your work.

     It can get you in LOTS of trouble!

     It devalues the original work.

     It‟s WRONG; it‟s THEFT.

  • 1/21/2011 12

    How can I avoid plagiarism within my work? The most important way to avoid

    plagiarizing is…

    GIVE CREDIT TO YOUR

    SOURCES!

    Whenever you use…

     another person‟s idea, opinion, or

    theory

     any facts, statistics, graphs,

    drawings,etc.-- any pieces of info.--

    that are not common knowledge

  • 1/21/2011 13

    Avoiding Plagiarism

    AND whenever you use...

     quotations of another person‟s

    actual written or spoken words

     a paraphrase of another person‟s

    written or spoken words

    IF YOU DON‟T KNOW,

    ASK, ASK, ASK!!!

  • 1/21/2011 14

    Remember... Plagiarism can be unintentional (“I

    didn‟t know”) to planned and deliberate (“I‟m NOT doing my own work, I‟ll just „borrow‟ this person‟s…”).

    Either way, it‟s still THEFT. And you WILL get in trouble!

  • 1/21/2011 15

    Paraphrasing

    This is when you use your own words and ideas to describe what you‟ve seen and/or read…

  • 1/21/2011 16

    Okay, read this passage, then put it in your

    own words….IN WRITING!!!

    The rise of industry, the growth of cities,

    and the expansion of the population were

    the three great developments of the

    nineteenth century American history. As

    new, larger, steam-powered factories

    became a feature of the American

    landscape in the East, they transferred farm

    hands into industrial laborers, and provided

    jobs for a rising tide of immigrants.

    Williams, Joyce. Lizzie Borden: A Case Book

    of Family and Crime in the 1890s. Indiana

    University Press, Bloomington: 1980.

    This is MLA

    Style

    bibliography!

  • 1/21/2011 17

    NOW…

    We’ll discuss in class what you’ve done, and

    how to keep on doing what you’re doing, or

    stop before you go any further…

    And remember:

  • 1/21/2011 18

    The key is to know what plagiarism is…

    Intentional plagiarism: deliberate copying or use of another's work without credit.

    Unintentional plagiarism: results from not knowing citation standards ("I thought the Internet was free!"), from sloppy research and poor note-taking, or from careless "cutting and pasting” of electronic sources. (UC Davis Website)

    IGNORANCE IS NO EXCUSE!

  • 1/21/2011 19

    Guidelines for avoiding plagiarism

     Use your own thoughts and ideas; choose

    with care…

     Give credit for copied, adapted, or

    paraphrased material

     Use quotations if you repeat another‟s

    exact words

  • 1/21/2011 20

    Guidelines, cont.

     Avoid using others‟ works with minor

    changes

    i.e., “Less” instead of “fewer”,

    reversing the order of sentence, etc.

     Common knowledge: If MOST people

    would know this info, then you‟re okay…

    WHEN IN DOUBT, CITE!

  • 1/21/2011 21

    Examples to AVOID…

    The Original Source:

    " In research writing, sources are cited for

    two reasons: to alert readers to the

    sources of your information and to give

    credit to the writers from whom you

    have borrowed words and ideas."  Another MLA

    Bibliography!

    Hacker, Diana. A Writer's Reference. St.

    Martin's Press, New York: 1995.

  • 1/21/2011 22

    Plagiarism (same words, no quotation marks):

    In research writing, sources are cited to alert

    readers to the sources of your information and

    to give credit to the writers from whom you have

    borrowed words and ideas.

    The student has used the author's exact words, leaving out

    only a phrase, without quotation marks or a citation.

  • 1/21/2011 23

    Also Plagiarism (incorrect paraphrase):

    In research writing, we cite sources for a couple

    reasons: to notify readers of our information

    sources and give credit to those from whom we

    have borrowed. (Hacker).

    The student has made only slight changes, substituting

    words such as "a couple" for "two", "notify" for "alert", and

    "our"/"we" for "your"/"you," leaving out a few words, and

    giving an incomplete citation.

  • 1/21/2011 24

    A Solution (appropriate paraphrase):

    A researcher cites her sources to ensure

    her audience knows where she got her

    information, and to recognize and

    credit the original work (Hacker, 260).

    This student has paraphrased in her own

    words, while accurately reflecting and citing

    the author's ideas.

  • 1/21/2011 25

    A Different Solution (quotation with cite):

    In her book A Writer's Reference, Diana Hacker

    notes, "In research writing, sources are cited for

    two reasons: to alert readers to the sources of your

    information and to give credit to the writers from

    whom you have borrowed words and ideas" (260).

    By introducing his source, the student signals that the

    following material is from that source. All verbatim words are

    in quotation marks, and the source of the quote is cited with

    a page number.

  • 1/21/2011 26

    What is “integrity”, and what does it matter to me?  According to the American

    Heritage Dictionary, integrity