Hortus Mortolensis - Enumeratio Plant Arum, 1912

download Hortus Mortolensis - Enumeratio Plant Arum, 1912

If you can't read please download the document

  • date post

    03-Dec-2014
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    223
  • download

    80

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Hortus Mortolensis - Enumeratio Plant Arum, 1912

HOI^TUS nORTOllNSI

ith Joad'i/

Banbury' s

(ooTrvpliments

La Mortola,Ventimiglia,Italy.1912.

SIR

THOMAS HANBURY,

K.C.V.O.,

F.L.S.

HORTUS MORTOLENSISENUMERATIO PL ANTARUM IN HORTO MORTOLENSI CULTA RUM

ALPHABETICAL

CATALOGUE OF PLANTSGROWINGIN

THE GARDEN OF

THE

LATE

SIR

THOMAS HANBUBY,

K.C.V.O.,ST.

F.L.S.LAZARUS

KNIGHT COMMANDER OF THE ORDERS OF ST. MAURICE AND AND OF THE CROSS OF THE CROWN OF ITALY

LA MORTOLAVENTIMIGLIA, ITALY

COMPILED BY

ALWIN BERGERCurator of the Garden

IToultroit

WEST,

NEWMAN

&

CO.,

HATTON GAEDEN

1912

mIMS-

13

LONDONrniNTED BY WEST, NEWMAN ANDHATTON GAllDEN,E.G.

CO,

CONTENTS.PAGE

PEEFACELIST

V..

OF BOOKS EEFEKEED TO

.

xvi

CATALOGUE

1

SUPPLEMENTNOTESSYSTEMATICSYNOPSIS

338354

OF

THE GENEEA

.

439

PREFACE.1897, a

As the last catalogue of the garden was published iu new edition becomes necessary, on account of the

changes which a large garden undergoes during so many years. Naturally, such a catalogue can never be considered as complete as is the catalogue of a library. It is almost antiquated by the time it is published, as new plants are constantly being introduced and others disappear. I think it therefore necessary to point out that no one must expect to find in the garden at the present moment every plant mentioned in this catalogue, nor in the catalogue the name of every plant to be found in the garden. The large collection recently made by Mr. Wilson in China and the plants collected in 1909-10 for the garden by Dr. J. Brunnthaler in South Africa are for the greater part yet undetermined and therefore only partly included. Nevertheless, the present catalogue will be of help to students who visit the garden, and will give correspondents an idea of what is cultivated or has been tried. The nomenclature adopted is that of the Index Kewensis, Engler and Prantl's Natilrliche PJianzenfamilien, the Colonial Floras edited from Kew, and the more important recent monographs, without adhering rigidly to any one of them. The references do not always give the original description and are not strictly chronological, but indicate where reliable descriptions and figures can be looked up inthe library of the garden. The first two catalogues of the plants grown at La Mortola one being an alphabetical, the other a systematic, enumeration of about 3600 species then in cultivation were compiled by the Curator, the late Gustav Cronemeyer, and published in 1889. They were distributed to all Botanical Gardens and to many other correspondents, with permission to draw upon the collection for all scientific purposes. Previous to this, in 1883, a list of seeds containing the names of 557 species was printed and circulated, and since that time has been issued annually. Seeds and plants are

Cj-

CSI

vi

HOETUS MORTOLENSISdistributedto

now

almost every botanical establishment

and to many private gardens, in increasing numbers. Many Colonial, Agricultural, and Forestry Departments send requests for them, and many a new botanical garden is indebted to La Mortola. In 1900, 6378 packets of seeds were sent out; in 1901, 7837; in in 1908 they numbered 13,085. 1902, 9331in the world,;

second alphabetical catalogue was compiled in the spring of 1897 by the then Curator, Mr. Curt Dinter, now Government Botanist in German South West Africa this contains about the same number of species as that of 1889. Since then no efforts have been spared to develop La Mortola into an important subtropical botanical garden. A small Botanical Museum, a Herbarium of cultivated and indigenous plants, and a Library containing the most necessary botanical works, chiefly on systematic and geographical botany, have been gradually formed. All three Museum, Herbarium, and Library receive constant additions and are now placed in a special building. Besides the annual distribution of seeds, fresh and dried material has been liberally sent to many laboratories, and students have been freely admitted to the garden. The introduction of new plants has been continued, and all the available land has been more intensively cultivated;

A

and planted.

Among

the chief contributors of seeds and plants

are indebted to

many Botanic Gardens

we

chiefly to

Kew,

Cambridge, Glasnevin, Edinburgh, Oxford, Dahlem-Berlin, Bonn, Darmstadt, Dresden, Freiburg i. Br., Giessen, Gottingen, Hamburg, Karlsruhe, Marburg, Munich, Strassburg, Prague, Schonbrunn, Vienna, Bale, Zurich, Amsterdam, St. Petersburg, Tifiis, Paris, Antibes (Villa Thuret), Lyons, Marseilles, Montpellier, Genoa, Rome, Naples, Palermo, Parma, St. Louis, Washington, Buitenzorg, Hong Kong, Buenos Aires, &c., also to the establishment of Haage & Schmidt at Erfurt, Vilmorin-Andrieux of Paris, and others. For plants from South Africa we are indebted chiefly to the late Prof. MacOwan, who was one of the oldest and most generous correspondents of Daniel and Thomas Hanbury to Mr. Arderne and the late Mr. Harry Bolus of Cape Town, Dr. Brunnthaler of Vienna, Prof. Burtt-Davy of Pretoria, Mr. Hislop of Pietermaritzburg, to Mr. Hutchins, formerly of Cape Town, to the late Max Leichtlin of Baden-Baden, to Dr. R. Marloth of Cape Town, Mr. Medley Wood of Durban, and to Dr. S. Schonland of Grahamstown. For;

PEEFACE

vii

plants from South- Western Africa we are indebted to Mr. Curt Dinter, Government Botanist in Okahandja. From Delagoa Bay seeds have been sent by the Bishopof

Lebombo

;

from German East Africa by Dr. Brunn-

thaler of Vienna, Prof. Dr. A. Engler of Dahlem, and by For plants and seeds from Prof. Dr. Stuhhiiann of Amani. British East Africa we are indebted to Mr. Dawe and Mr.

Brown

of the Botanic Garden in Entebbe, and to Mr. Hutchins of Nairobi, Chief Conservator of Forests in British East Africa; for plants from Eritrea and Ahijssinia to Prof. J. Baldrati of Asmara, to Prof. Penzig of Genoa, Prof. Georg Schweinfm'th of Berlin, and to Cav. C. Sprenger for plants from Egypt and of Naples (now of Corfu); Southern Arabia to Prof. Georg Schweinfurth. Plants from the Canary Islands we owe to the kindness of the late Mr. Morris of Ivybridge, to Lord Walsingham and to Dr. Perez of Orotava. Western and Southern Mediterranean plants were contributed by Miss Willmott, Mr. C. Bicknell of Bordighera and M. Henri Correvon of Geneva. Those of the Eastern Mediterranean were procured through Mr. Hartmann, chiefly from the Island of Cyprus and Syria; for Istrian and Dalmatian plants we are indebted

De Marchesetti of Trieste. Plants and seeds have also been kindly sent from from the Mauritius by Bishop Gregory and Dr. Konig Island of Sohotra by Prof. Balfour of Edinburgh and Prof, von Wettstein of Vienna. For Indian plants we owe our thanks to the late Sir Dietrich Brandis and the late Sir George King, also to the Directors of the Botanic Gardens at Calcutta, Lai Bagh, and Peradenya for Chinese plants to the Director of the Botanic Garden in Hong Kong, to M. Puteaux in Versailles, Cav. Sprenger, Prof. Sargent, Mr. Wilson, and others. For Californian plants we are indebted to Mrs.Brandegee, Prof. C. F. Baker of Claremont, and Dr. F. Franceschi of for Mexican plants to Prof. N. L. Britton Santa Barbara of New York, Prof. Conzatti of Oaxaca, Mr. C. A. Purpus of Flagstaff, Dr. J. N. Eose of Washington, Dr. H. Boss of Munich, Prof. Wm. Trelease of St. Louis, to the late Dr. Weber of Paris, and others for plants from Costa Bica to Mr. Charles Werkle of San Jose for West Indian plants to Prof. C. F. Baker of Cuba (now of Claremont, Cal.), to Mr. Fawcett late of Jamaica, and to Messrs. Knight of London for Chilian plants to Mr. Ed. Framm of Hamburg and toto Prof.; ; ; ; ; ;

viii

HOKTUS MOETOLENSIS

Dr. J. Sohrens, Director of the Botanic Gardens in Santiago; from South Brazil to Mr. Reukart of Villefranche, and to Prof, von Wettstein of Vienna; for Uruguay plants to Prof. Arechavaleta of Montevideo for Argentine plants to the late Dr. Weber of Paris. For Australian plants we are indebted to the late Baron von Miiller, to the late Mr. van den Bossche, to Messrs. Veitch & Sons of London, and to the Directors of the Botanic Gardens of Melbourne, Port Darv^in and Sydney, and others. For Neio Zealand plants to Captain DorrienSmith of Tresco Abbey, Scilly, and to Dr. A. R. Wallace. Besides these, v^e owe numerous plants to the kindness of many whose names it is impossible to enumerate here, but of which some are given in the notes at the end of thefor plants;

catalogue.

The garden is practically never without flowers. The end of September may be considered as the dullest time, but as soon as the autumnal rains set in, the flowering begins and continues on an ever-increasing scale until the middle of April or beginning of May. Then almost every plant is in flower the most marked features being the graceful branches of the single yellow Banksian rose,;

Fortune's yellow rose, the sweet-scented Pittosporum, the wonderful crimson Cantua huxifolia, and the blue spikes of the Canarian EcJiium. Early in January the spring flowers begin to bloom Anemones, Antholyza, Narcissus, Iris, Sparaxis, Freesias, &c., but before the end of May these have all withered, and the bare soil is a strange sight to those who are accustomed to the green lawns of northern gardens. In May many succulents begin to flower, the Opuntias

and Mesembrianthemums especially showing a great variety of c